Skip to main content

Full text of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World"

See other formats


Class JBRi^ 
Book ^E-^B 

C0FXRIGHT DEPOSm 



Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 




Packard Campus 
for Audio Visual Conservation 
www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loG.gov/rr/mopiG 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loG.gov/rr/record 



i 



j 

I 

I 

i 

i 
I 

i 

I 

j 



I 
! 

I 

I' 




EXHIEITOM 




— w ^ 



OVING PICTU 

ORL 





MERGERS MAKE GREATNESS! 

That's w\vy Metro'QoId-uo'n-Mayer is the 
greatest organization in the Industry — 9 
That's why you can play such productions as 




starring 

LILLIAN GIS 

directed by 

FRED NIBLO 




NOW playing 
CAPACITY at $2 
ASTOR, N. Y. 
GET ready to play 
SIMULTANEOUSLY! 



IN OLD HEIDELBERG 



ADVERTISE it 
DIRECT from 
4 Big Months 
ON Broadway 
AT $2 admission! 




UDENT 
RINCE 



IT is the rage of 
BROADWAY at $2 

YOU can play it 
AT the same time 
IN your town! 



METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 




WuRuIzER Organs dominate 
the broadcasting field 

The outstanding leadership of the famous Wurlitzer 
Organ among the finest theatres in America is every- 
where conceded. Wurlitzer prestige now extends to 
all parts of the world. The same recognition of su- 
periority accorded the Wurlitzer Theatre Organ is 
also conceded to the Wurlitzer Residence Reproducing 
Organ, the Wurlitzer Church Organ, the Wurlitzer 
Auditorium Organ and the Wurlitzer Broadcasting 
Organ — each a masterpiece in construction and tonal 
beauty — each type of organ distinctively designed for 
each individual installation. 




WURUIZER Organ 

FACTORIES, NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y. 

NEW YORK ST. LOUIS . BUFFALO DETROIT 

CLEVELAND CHICAGO " SAN FRANCISCO KANSAS CITY 

PHILADELPHIA PITTSBURGH CINCINNATI LOS ANGELES 



0 



3 




while the 
world hails 
the gold 
medal winner 



— now comes its 
brilliant sequel! 




like 'Beau Geste ", romance of 
the French Foreign Legion 




The astonishing sequel to ^^Beau Geste" by the same author. Seething 
melodrama of the French Foreign Legion, with all the stirring action and 
drama that made "Beau Geste" such a hit, plus uproarious comedy and a 
thrilling love story. The book was a best seller, and everybody who has seen 
or heard of "Beau Geste" will want to see its sequel ''Beau Sabreur". 



Beau 



Sabreur " 



The answer to "Beau Gesle", by Pereival ( Wren, 
with Gary (looper, Evelyn Brent, INoah Beery 
an«l William Powell. Directed by John Waters. 



10 Great Paramount 
Specials For 1928. 

"BEAU SABREUR" 
HAROLD LLOYD in "SPEEDY" * 
"GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES" 
"OLD IRONSIDES" 

"THE Last Command" (j«„r.f«^s) 

"TILLIE'S PUNCTURED ROMANCE" 
"LE<;iON OF THE CONDEMNED" 
"BEHIND THE GERMAN LINES" 
"STREET OF SIN" Uauui.ie.s) 

"KIT CARSON" (Fred T/iom*o«) 
* Prod, by Harold Lloyd Corp. Paramount Release. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



3 




brilliaot 






Paramount 



Motion Picture Headquarters 




Q^^lfear of Acccmiplisliiiient 
^Cl^^ Unparalleled in 
V/^y Motion Pictwe Histoiy 






Octobear] 



WHAT PRICE GLORY breaks box-office records at $a.oo admissions. 

■Ground broken and construction started on new $3,000,000 improvements at 
Fox Studios in Hollywood and Fox Hills, California, paving the way for the 
$100,000,000 picture-making program in next five years. 

•William Fox acquires the Roxy, world's largest and finest motion picture theatre, 
to provide worthy outlet for the new quality pictures issuing regularly from 
the Fox Studios. 

-LOVES OF CARMEN, with Dolores Del Rio and Victor McLaglen, completed 
under direction of Raoul Walsh. 

-7TH HEAVEN, directed by Frank Borzage, has world premiere at Carthay 
Circle Theatre, Los Angeles, and establishes two new stars, Janet Gaynor and 
Charles Farrell. 

-THE COCK-EYED WORLD, by Laurence Stallings is announced for produc- 
tion by Raoul Walsh to continue the amorous adventures of Sergeant Quirt 
and Captain Flagg. 

-Movietone developed by Fox-Case adds incredibly reabstic sound to the films, 
with demonstration of Lindbergh film at the Roxy. 

-Greatest weekly gross of any motion picture tneatre in the world taken in at 
Roxy with $144,267.30 in 7 days of WHAT PRICE GLORY. 

-Winfield Sheehan signs exclusive contracts with Carl Mayer, author of THE 
LAST LAUGH and CALIGARI, and with Henri Bernstein, Europe's most distin- 
guished dramatist, whereby both will write dramas for production at Fox Studio. 

-THE DOLLAR PRINCESS, BLOSSOM TIME, MOTHER KNOWS BEST, 
HONOR-BOUND, SPEAKEASY bought for production as Fox super films. 

-F. W. Murnau begins production of THE 4 DEVILS with Farrell Macdonald, 
Charles Morton, Mary Duncan, Nancy Drexel and Barry Norton. 

-Fox Movietone Newsreel inauguarates weekly release of current events that 
you can hear as well as see. 



the One Cteat Independent 



yLYesij of Sta>£litY 

Insunng Omtiiiuea 
Fox Success ^ ^'^ 



April 

Hay 
June 
Jidy 



Oc|ober 



- New Year brings new era in sight and sound divertissements witk twelve Fox 
Movietone Entertainments ready for release and a series of condensed versions 
of musical comedies in Movietone production. 

FOUR SONS reveals John Ford playing on the heart strings of the world in 
the epic drama produced from the story by Miss I. A. R. Wylie. 

-Frank Borzage does the impossible in excelling his magnificent 7th HEAVEN 
with the new Janet Gaynor. Charles Farrell love lyric, THE STREET ANGEL. 

-With $750,000 spent in production, MOTHER MACHREE completely justifies 
exhibition delay in demonstrating that it is one of the most emotionally power- 
ful pictures of all time. 

- Fox sales forces meet at New York convention for advance showing of greatest 
line-up of pictures ever produced for a year's entertainment. 

- Smart exhibitors banish all worry for a year by contracting for 51 Fox profit 
pictures, including five of demonstrated road-show calibre. 

- Movietone installations in hundreds of theatres provide the box-office pulmotors 
which theatres everywhere are demanding. 

-August heat is intensified by the torrid FAZIL, with Greta Nissen stimulat- 
ing both Charles Farrell and box-office receipts. 

-General release of SUNRISE brings long- waited Murnau production to startle 
and delight appreciative audiences. 

-Broadway cabarets and the gay life are stripped of their glamor in the melo- 
dramatic sensation SPEAKEASY, from the play by Edward Knoblock. 

-Dolores Del Rio and Charles Farrell rise to new dramatic heights in Raoul 
Walsh's production THE RED DANCER (of Moscow). 

-With five tremendous specials in production, including BLOSSOM TIME, 
THE MUD TURTLE, MOTHER KNOWS BEST, THE DOLLAR PRINCESS, 
and THE COCK-EYED WORLD, supremacy of Fox Films in 1929 seems assured. 
Ride alon^ with Fox for another happy new year! 




StabAitv IS 




EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



C ACCLAIMS TIFFANY 




^rwse from the 
Qreatest of Showmen 



Under Personal Direction of S. L.ROTHAFEL (Roxy) 



133 WBST 50th STREET 



Tiffany Productions, 
1542 Broadway, 
Hew York, H.T. 



Sentiemen; 



Dec. 6tta, 1927. 



•nriLS GESSE" has played her« and «&s 
Tery nicely received. 

It la a picture that patrons will rem«B>er 
long after they leave the theatre and 1 eon£^tul«te 
you upon heing ite producers and distrlTButorB.y 




9/;e Picture the Wi 



^roman 
enthusiastic Author 



■SV 



11 




36- 



X 



G7/ie Better Entertainment 



PREDIOTIOJ-* 



0< 



BROKE ALL HOUSE RECORDS 
AT THE "GRANADA" AND 
"MARbRO" THEATRES. 
CHICAGO ~ EXCEEDED 
BOX-OFPICE RECORD OF 
"WHAT PRICE GLORY" 
PLAYED PREVIOUS WEEK. 



TIFFANY-STAHL PRODUCTION Sjnc. 

M.H.HOFFMAN, VICE PRES. 

1540 BROADWAY NEW YORK CITY 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



STAHL'S GliEAT SCREEN DRAMA 




Has Been Waiting For 




STANDING ROOM ONLY" 
AT THE MARKS BROS.' 
"MARDBO" CHICAGO 



AT THE MARKS BROS. 
"CRANADA''CHICAGO 



GJhe. Better bnlertainment 




TUI PI^ESS AGI^CtS WITH TUt PDDIIC THAT WILD GEESt IS A CHEAT PICTURE 



"Wild Gccse*' is far above the average. Further- 
more the acting is excellent. -^T^etf Yor\ Sun. 

"An exceedingly worthy TiffanyStahl produc- 
tion. High class picture fare." 

— J^ew Xor\ Daily T^ews. 

"Film to be remembered, A film that you will 
remember long after the numberless 'box office 
bets' are forgotten."— Tvietv Torfj American. 

"Do not miss 'Wild Geese.' It holds a lure all its 
own." — 7s(. Y. Herald Tribune. 

"Considerably above the standard of recent films 
at the Roxy Theatre — well acted by a Tiffany- 
Stahl cast." — A[. r. Graphic. 



Transmuted to the screen, 'Wild Geese' is almost 
as gripping as the authoress' word-painting. 
TiffanyStahl emerge creditably. "-^Var-iety. 

This film reveals a great deal of studious care 
in its production."— 7^{. Y. Ttmei. 

'Tiffany-Stahl has quite a flawless gem here on 
which exhibitors throughout the country will 
cash in."-?— Z?aily Review. 

' 'Wild Geese' is well-worth seeing." 

—Chicago Evening Post. 

' 'Wild Geese' is a solemn and enthralling film. 
Vigorous, moving and as a photoplay— novel 
and distinctive. "—Cfiicago Journal, 

' 'Wild Geese' splendid filming of novel. It is 
one splendid film."— Cfiicago T.ribune. 



"Fine story, acting and direction. A remarkable 
movie."— Chicago American, 

"Will hold audiences spellbound." 

'^Screen Opinions. 

" *Wild Geese' will feather your nest." 

— Moving Picture Worlct, 

" 'Wild Geese' a passionate and forceful picture 
of a living American theme." 

— Portland (Me) Press Herald, 

" 'Wild Geese' is excellently done." 

— Brooklyn (7<i.Y.) Standard Union, 

"It is an unusual picture. It may be chalked as 
this year's best." 

—Bridgeport (Conn. ) Times Star i 



A BOOK READ BY OVER 3,000,000 PEOPIE--— RAN SEI^IALLY IN 
THE PICTOI^IAL I^EVIEW - 8 EDITIONS PRINTED OP NOVEL 



TIFFANY-STAHL PRODUCTION Sjnc. 

M.H.HOFFMAN, VICE PRES. 

1540 BROADWAY NEW YORK CITY 



Sensations cf^ 




FBO and Le Baron in Blazing 
Triumph of Master Showman-i 
ship! Book NOW . • . or get^ 
lost in the shuffle! 




^ShowTradef 




10 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



THE 



THE BIGGEST NEWS 
OF THE NEW YEAR! 

$2 ASTOR SMASH HIT! 

Qet ready to play it 
simultaneous with its 
sensational Broadway run 




VICTORY! 

JOHN 
GILBERT 
GRETA 
GARBO in 

LOVE 

Advertise it for your 
theatre at the same 
time it is the rage of 
Broadway at $2 Embassy. 



VICTORY! 

RAMON 
NOVARRO 
NORMA 
SHEARER in 
ERNST LUBITSCH'S 

THE STUDENT 
PRINCE 

in Old Heidelberg^' 

Advertise it direct from 
4 fetg montfi5 on Broadway 
at $2 at Astor Theatre 



All 

played 
in 

your 

theatre 

at 

popular 

prices 

while 

New 

York 

asks 

$2 





-G- 




Starring 

LILLIAN GISH 

directed by 

FRED NIBLO 

who made "Ben-Hur" 

based on Charming Pollock's 
world-famed stage classic 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



11 




^ for h(X%hs fh^y pine / 

^ And 

JIEIRIRY IDIRE^V 

//I MSRMAW COMSVmS 




is just the hoy to furnish them. Here's a new 
comedy star who is walking away from the 
field. Keep your eye on him, for you wonH 
want him to walk away from you — to your 
competition. 



JERRY was a scream in "FOX 
TALES'^ and a roar in "BRU- 
NETTES PREFER GENTLE- 
MEN." You know that if you saw 
these recent MERMAID COME- 
DIES. But wait till you see him 
in "HIGH STRUNG," which 
will be ready this month. Then 
you'll know that here is a real 
comedian. And you'll see why 
E. W. Hammons has signed him 
for a long term for featured parts 
in these 



JACK WHITE 
PRODUCTIONS 



EDUCATIONAL 
FILM EXCHANGES, Inc. 

President '"^ A 



—THE SPICE OF THE PROGRAM" 



Qducers and Distributors of America, Inc. Will H. Hays, President 



"She's standing them up 
at the RIVOLI N.Y, 



^^Quite a tribute to ^The Devil Dancer^ 
and its star* As we prophesied some 
time ago, Gilda will break records 
with this one*^^ 

New York Morning Telegraph 



"Star should get them. Suit- 
able for all types of houses." 
Motion Picture News. 



Qolden 
Qilda'' 

she dazzles 
anew with her 
most thrilling 
and unusual 
romance^ 



"A tremendously interesting 
and magnificently produced 
drama. Should act like a 
magnet at the box-office. 
Exhibitors Daily Kevierv. 



"Has the best picture of her 



career. 



Variety. 



"Will make a merry-go- 
round of the pay stile. Some- 
thing that will line 'em on 
both sides of the marquee." 
Moving Picture World. 



Samuel 
Qoldwyn 

*^ -"resents 



GUdd 

Gray; 





oih Clive Brooke ^ Harry Hervey 
c^FREDNIBLO PRODUCTION 

UNmD ARTI^T^ PICTURE 



14 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 





"THERE'S THE PICTURE I WANT 
TO SEE-JOHN GILBERT AND 
GRETA GARBO IN 'LOVE'" 

(—you*ll hear that a lot in 19281) 



M-G-M GREAT SO FAR I 
AND NOW LOOK! 



Jan. 7th 
\VM. HAINES in 

WEST POINT 

Jan. Hth 
GRETA GARBO 

in 

Th^ DIVINE 
WOMAN 

Ian. 21st 
Karl DANE 
Geo. K.ARTHUR 
in BABY MINE 

Jan.2Ist 
TIM McCOY in 
LAW OF 
THE RANQE 

Jan. 23ih 
NORMA 
SHEARER in 

PULLMAN 
PARTNERS 



Feb. 4th 
ROSE MARIE 



Feb. nth 
Lew CODY 
Aileen PRINGLE 
in WICKEDNESS 
PREFERRED 



Feb. 18th 
LON CHANEY in 
THE BIG CITY 



Feb. 25th 
WM. HAINES in 
THE SMART SET 



HIT after hit! 

M-G-M at the box-office 

IS clicking, clicking: 

"Big Parade", "Ben-Hur", "Man, Woman 
and Sin", "London After Midnight", "Fair 
Co-ed", "Spring Fever", "13th Hour" etc. 



XOVE"-"Student Prince'^- 
AND now ^The Enemy/' 
WHAT a product! 
AND look what's coming ^^^^ 

Metro-goldwyn-maye 



YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' 
YET -WAIT! WATCH! 

Mar. 24th 
TIM McCOY in 
WYOM/NG 

Mar. 31st 
MLLE FROM 
ARMENTIERES 

Apr. 7th 
LON CHANEY in 
LAUGH, CLOWN, 
LAUGH 

Apr. 14th 
THE COSSACKS 

starring 
JOHN GILBERT 

Apr. 28th 
UNDER THE 
BLACfC EAGLE 



Mar. 3rd 
KING VIDOR'S 

THECROVfD 

Mar. 10th 
RAMON 
NOVARRO in 
FORB/DDEN 
HOURS 

Mar. 17th 
MARION 
DA VIES in 
THE PATSY 

Mar. 24th 
Marie DRESSLER 
Polly MORAN in 
^BRINGING UP 
FATHER 




theGREATEST YEAR^oftFiRsr NATIONAL 






before we sfcarfc 





SPECIAlf in eveni phare cftite promise' 



NORMA TALMADGE 

in CAMILLE 

Making history for box-office turnover-sensation wherever it 
plays — extended runs all over the country. 

Richard BARTHELMESS 

in THE PATENT LEATHER KID 

Directed by Alfred Santell 
An Alfred Santell Production 

Sixteen weeks on Broadway — Seven weeks Chicajjo — Five 
weeks in Detroit — not half started and already the ace hit of 
the year. 

HELEN OF TROY 

Took New York by storm — critics raved — business soared — 
the greatest book of the past decade on the most sensational 
woman in history. 

A TEXAS STEER 

With WILL ROGERS 

LOUISE FAZENDA AND A FIVE-STAR CAST 

Backed by $800,000 in advertisings — the most popular personal- 
ity in the world in a love cometly that'll stanti 'em out in a 
bli::ard. 



Harold Bell Wright's 
SHEPHERD OF the HILLS 

Read by millions — booked by more exhibitors on announce- 
ment alone than most pictures get in a lifetime. 

THE GORILLA 

Directed by Alfred Santell 
An Alfred Santell Production 

You know what this is doing — breakin{» record after record — 
setfinfj a pace that bii»gest hits can't equal. 

A GEORGE FITZMAURICE PRODUCTION 

ROSE t°/e golden WEST 

For beauty — for romance — for get-'em-in and keep-'em-comintj 
quality you'll have to look far and wide to beat this special. 




WEEK-AFTER-WEEK-HITS nfou au^ bea^ ^ 



JOHN McCOAMICK Procnii 

COLLEEN MOORE 

in 

Her Wild Oat 

RICHARD 

B ARTHELMESS 

in 

The Noose 
MILTON SILLS 

in 

Valley of the Giants 



MAN CRAZY 

with 

Dorothy Mackaill 
and Jack Mulhall 

JOHNNY MINES 

In 

Home Made 
THE WHIP WOMAN 

with 

Antonio Moreno, Estelle 
Taylor, Lowell Sherman 



FRENCH DRESSING 

with 

H. B. Warner, Cllve Brook, 
LolsWilson,LilyanTashman 

SAILORS' WIVES 

with 

Mary Astor, Lloyd Hughes 
HARRY LANGDON 

in 

The Chaser 



The 



EXHIBITORS 

HERALD 



Home 



Independent JH—^ JBL / SL^flL^ JH.-^^ Office: 

Film Trade ^ MOVING PICTURE 407 So. Dearborn St. 

Paper A V^^^^^^k. ^^^^ ^H"^^ Chicago 



WORLD 



IN THIS ISSUE 



Leaders in all branches of the industry welcome the first appearance of Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World as the one outstanding development in the history of the trade press, merg- 
ing in one publication a gross circulation of more than 17,000, consolidating unprecedented buying 
power and concentrating leadership in trade journalism. 



COMPLETE INDEX TO CONTENTS 



" NEWS 

Al Smith denounces censors; Demands statute be repealed; Must cease 
throttling freedom, says New York governor. 

Comedy-drama in public favor; Midwest patrons want to laugh, survey 
by Jenkins shows — Wrigley chain theatre move is denied. 
Increase advertising to push B. O. ; Texas exhibitors get set for best ex- 
ploitation year — St. Louis Jews protest "King of Kings." 
Showmanship chases overseating jinx at Kansas City — Contract committee 
meets in Chicago January 31 — Seat tax bill is delayed. 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

FILM AND EQUIPMENT— Metro, Wurlitzer, Paramount, Fox, Tiffany- 
Stahl, F B' 0, Educational, United Artists, First National, International 
Projector, Colleen Moore, Eastman, National Screen Service, Automatic 
Ticket Register, Rayart, Columbia, Si Greiver. 

PRESENTATION— Heller and Riley, Albert F. Brown, Bennie Krueger, 
Don Isham, Ed Meikel, Villa Moret, Ted Leary, Billy Randall, Arthur 
Richler, Ramon Berry, Maxwell and Lee, Paramount Costumes, Bernard 
Cowham, Benny and Western, Leo Feist, Jerome H. Remick, Ray Turner, 
Florence Brady, Al Kvale, Ed Fitch, Francis Kromar, Charles Kaley, L. 
Carlos Meier, Brooks Costumes, David Gould, Ransley Studios. 



FEATURES 



Better Projection 5Q 

Service Talks, by T. O. Service gj 

Los Angeles, by Ray Murray 42 

Re-Takes 

Pictorial Section 37 

Letters from Readers 73 

New York, by John S. Spargo 35 

Broadway 28 



DEPARTMENTS 

The Studio 40 

Live News from Coast to Coast 45 

Short Features 47 

Presentation Acts 52 

The Theatre ^4 

New Pictures 57 

Press Sheets 58 

Quick Reference Chart 59 

Classified Advertising 78 

What the Picture Did for Me 79 

The Box Office Ticker go 



CHICACO 

407 South Dearborn St. Telephones Harrison 0036-37-38 
Cable Address: Quigpubco 
EDWIN S. CLIFFORD, General Manager 

JAY M. SHRECK, Managing Editor 
GEORGE CLIFFORD, Business Manager 
ERNEST A. ROVELSTAD, Neivs Editor 

LOS 4NCELES 

5617 Hollywood Blvd. Telephone Gladstone 3754 

RAY MURRAY, Manager 
DOUGLAS HODGES, Advertising Manager 



EDITORIAL 
AND 
ADVERTISING 
OFFICES 



yEW YORK 

565 Fifth Avenue Telephones Vanderbilt 3612-3613 

JAMES BEECROFT, Manager 
JOHN S. SPARGO, New York Neios Editor 

LONDON 
THE BIOSCOPE 
(J. Caboum, Editor) 
Faraday House 
8-10 Charing Cross Rd., W. C. 2 



SUBSCRIPTION RAT1':S: 



United Stales and possessions $3.00 per year. Canada — $4.50 per year. Other points of the world S6.00 per year. Single copies 25 cents. 

Advertising rate cards and Audit Bureau of Circulations statements furnished upon application. 



20 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS 

HERALD 

as^ MOVING PICTURE 

WORLD 

Martin J. Quigley, Publisherafivs Editor 

Incorporating Exhibitors Herai.d, founded in 1915; Moving Pic- 
ture World, founded in 1907; Motography, founded in 1909; and 
The Film Index, founded in 1909 

Published Every Wednesday by 

QuicLEY Publishing Company 

Publication Office: 407 So. Dearborn St., CHICAGO, U. S. A. 
Martin J. Quigley, President 
Edwin S. Clifford, Secretary George Clifford, Asst. Treasurer 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
Copyright, 1928, by Quigley Publishing Company 
All editorial and business correspondence 
should be addressed to the Chicago office 
Other Publications: The Chicagoan and Poio, class journals; and the follow- 
ing motion picture trade publications published as supplements to Exhibitors 
Herald and Moving Picture World: Better Theatres, every fourth week, and 
The Box Office Record & Equipment Index, semi-annual. 

Whole Vol. 90, No. I. (Vol. 32, No. 4) January 7, 1928 

The Consolidated 
Publication 

WITH this, the first issue of the New Year, the con- 
solidated publication — ^ Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World — makes its bow to the industry. 
Trus, auspiciously, at the opening of another calendar 
term our renewed and fortified effort to serve effectively 
and thoroughly the motion picture industry is launched. 

The consolidation of these two leading motion picture 
trade papers is a thoroughly sound and logical develop- 
ment. The motion picture industry has definitely advanced 
out of its earlier status and earlier characteristics. It has 
become solidified and entrenched. It has achieved an ad- 
justment of its affairs which makes for a higher degree of 
efficiency and a higher degree of accomplishment. It has 
arrived at a point where thoroughly sound and competent 
effort only is welcomed. 

A trade publication, in order to be able to discharge the 
responsibilities now being placed upon it, must be stronger 
and more able than even the best of those which have 
flourished in the past. 

» s » 

IN order to supply the industry with a trade paper of 
adequate strength, influence and circulation the merger 
of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World was 
devised. Under this merger there is not merely accom- 
plished a combination of the individual resources and effec- 
tiveness of these two publications, because out of the merg- 
ing there comes a new publication of new and greater 
advantages and influence. 

The combination of Exhibitors Herald and Moving 
Picture World realizes a goal which myself and my asso- 
ciates have been endeavoring to reach for nearly 13 years. 
This goal is a publication commensurate with the require- 
ment of being able to serve effectively and appropriately 
the entire motion picture industry in all of its branches and 



and in all of its territoi-ies. And this goal is now reached 
in the consolidation of Exhibitors Herald and Moving 
Picture World. 

By joining together the circulations built up by these 
two publications in their many years of service to the in- 
dustry there is effected an aggregate circulation which 
vastly exceeds the most hopeful expectations of any other 
publisher in the history of motion picture trade journalism. 

Through the merging of Exhibitors Herald and Mov- 
ing Picture World the consolidated publication has 
gained a circulation that literally encompasses the industry 
— a circulation that reaches virtually every theatre in the 
land and every person of importance in the industry out- 
side of the theatre field. 

The combination brings to the consolidated publication 
a fund of editorial experience and information, a personnel 
of proven ability and resources of every character that are 
adequate to insure that the progress of the past will be 
but a stepping-stone to the greater accomplishments of the 
future. 

•If * -» 

rHE necessity for the building of fewer and stronger 
units to replace a greater number of lesser strength 
which has so markedly changed the complexion of the 
production, distribution and exhibition branches of the 
industry was bound eventually to have its influence upon 
the trade paper branch of the industry. 

We are gratified indeed that it has been allotted to us 
to carry through successfully negotiations which have 
changed the complexion of the trade paper situation in 
keeping with the times. The industry demanded — and re- 
quired — fewer trade papers and one at least of such calibre 
as to match the present standing and scope of the industry. 

Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World is of 
.such calibre. Its position in every important respect is 
supreme in its field and it is now enabled to serve every 
reader in a manner that is adequately in keeping with what 
should be expected from a publication in that position. 

Our publication policies have had the sanction of time 
as well as the sanction of the industry's approval, so it 
will now only be necessary to record that there will be no 
deviation from those policies which enabled our former 
publication effort to achieve leadership in the field. 

We are well-aware of the responsibility which attends 
the launching of a publication of the plan and scope of 
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World in a trade 
of such vital significance as the motion picture industry. 
And it shall be our unwavering determination to meet this 
responsibility four-square in every particular. The influ- 
ence of the leading motion picture trade paper upon public 
relations, upon the public's attitude toward pictures 
through its contact with and effect upon newspapers and 
magazines, and upon legislation, is a matter of no little 
importance. In this vital regard, also. Exhibitors Herald 
AND Moving Picture World will seek zealously to dis- 
charge its full responsibility. 

We wish here to thank those persons throughout the 
length and breadth of the industry whose kindly felicita- 
tions concerning the merger have reached us. We wish 
particularly to thank Mr. Will H. Hays whose constructive 
suggestions and encouragement have had no small influ- 
ence upon the developments which have led to the con- 
solidation of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World. 

And, finally, we record again our pledge that Exhibitors 
Herald and Moving Picture World will remain unwaver- 
ingly committed to the highest ideal of service to the 
motion picture industry in all of its branches. 

—MARTIN J. QUIGLEY 



January 7, 1928 



EXfflBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



21 



Trade Hails Publication Merger 
As Greatest Step to Progress 

Congratulations Pour In 
From All Parts of World 



Radio Corp, 
In Combine 
With FB O 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4. — The 
Radio Corporation of America and 
associated companies, the General 
Electric Company, Westinghouse 
Electric and Manufacturing Com- 
pany, have acquired a substantial 
interest in F B O Pictures Corpora- 
tion, according to announcement 
today by Joseph P. Kennedy, presi- 
dent of F B O. 

Negotiations were concluded by 
Mr. Kennedy and David Sarnoff, 
vicepresident of the Radio Corpora- 
tion. Two representatives of the 
Radio Corporation of America and 
the General Electric Company will 
become directors of F B O. 

This announcement is of astounding 
importance to the motion picture indus- 
try because the affiliation opens to mo- 
tion pictures for 
the first time the 
tremendous re- 
sources and poten- 
t i a li t i e s of the 
radio. 

The arrange- 
ment will give the 
motion picture in- 
dustry the use of 
all present patents 

Joseph p. Kennedy and prOSpective 

developments of sound reproduction 
and synchronization, radio broadcasting 
and television of the Radio Corporation 
of America, the General Electric Com- 
pany and Westinghouse Electric and 
Manufacturing Company. 

This will bring to the motion picture 
business the services of powerful engi- 
neering organizations of the three great- 
est electrical compeinies in the world 
and the directing energies and resources 
of their laboratories toward the perfec- 
tion of every phase of apparatus and 
equipment and to the exploration of 
new fields of electrical research in con- 
junction with motion picture produc- 
tion and exhibition. 

The first important development of 
the combination will be the presenta- 
tion of a new method of sound repro- 
duction and synchronization, which has 
been perfected by General Electric. 




High Tension of Exhibiting Made Consolidation of Pub- 
lications Imperative, Says One Well-Wisher 

The announcement made last week of the merger of the two 
leading business papers in the motion picture industry, "Exhib- 
itors Herald and Moving Picture World," created a sensation in 
film circles in this country and abroad. 

Bringing together as it did the only two film papers which are members of 
the Audit Bureau of Circulations, the entire industry hastened to express ap- 
proval of this amalgamation which has established contact for the advertiser 
with the most complete buying market offered by the business press of the- 
picture industry. 

In the flood of cablegrams, telegrams and letters which have been received 
and are continuing to arrive as this first issue of "Exhibitors Herald and Mov- 
ing Picture World" is going to press, the industry's most prominent representa- 
tives speak of the merger as the most laudable and constructive ever effected 
by this industry's business papers. 

Theatre owners, realizing the wider scope of service which the merged 
publication will be in a position to render, have hailed the amalgamation as the 
outstanding development, beneficial to the exhibition field, in the business paper 
branch of the film industry. 

The high tension of exhibiting pictures today, said one prominent 
exhibitor, "makes it imperative that the trade paper field be covered in a 
compact manner." 1 , 

Advertisers (producers and distributors, stars, directors, scenarists, camera- 
men and other studio technicians) see in the merger a movement of far- 
reaching importance and bearing directly upon the industry's rapid develop- 
ment toward more sound business and economical methods. 

"Now," said one distributor and producer, "we can buy our advertising 
on a business basis as advertisers in other fields do." 

The announcement of the merger, so closely had it been guarded, came as a 
great and welcome surprise to the industry in general, and as the outstanding 
news event of the closing days of 1927. The industry, though the time was 
ripe for this far-reaching development, did not expect it, and this served to 
accentuate its importance, as is attested in the scores of congratulatory mes- 
sages published on the following pages. 

"Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World" with this issue incorporates 
in its pages the manifold services which have been published heretofore in the 
individual publications, "Exhibitors Herald" and "Moving Picture World." 



Now Turn the Page 



"Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World" regrets thai scores of 
congratulatory messages arrived too late for publication in this issue. 
Those not appearing on the following pages will be published in succeed- 
ing issues. 



22 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTLTRE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



"I regard this achievement a great 



From WILL H. HAYS 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I hasten to congratulate you on the consummation of the 
merger of "Exhibitors Herald" with "Moving Picture 
World." I regard this achievement as a great forward step 
in our industry — one bound to contribute much, indeed, to- 
ward the solution of those certain heretofore difficult prob- 
lems in the business of motion pictures with which you have 
been so familiar. 

"Moving Picture World" takes us virtually to the begin- 
ning of pictures — ^the days of the nickelodeon and the one 
reel feature. What a span 21 years covers in this fast mov- 
ing industry! What a contribution to education and enter- 
tainment motion pictures have become! And during all of 
that period of pioneering and accomplishment the "Moving 
Picture World" has been striving for the realization of those 
ideals that make work and living really worth while. 

The progressive and aggressive attitude of "Exhibitors 
Herald" has always appealed to me. I have long appreciated 
its splendid position and useful service in the publicity phase 
of this great industry and it is the source of much gratifica- 
tion to know that this welding of forces, represented by these 
two great publications, was your accomplishment. 

Under your management and direction this consolidated 
journal will continue to be, I am sure, a still greater influence 
for betterment. 

With kindest personal regards and best wishes always. 

Wm H. Hays. 

:fc sje 4t 

From J. CABOURN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Hearty Greetings and best wishes. 

J. Caboum, 
Editor, "The Bioscope," London. 

* * * 

From WILLIAM FOX 
Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Allow me to congratulate you on the consolidation of "Ex- 
hibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." I believe this 
is a constructive move in the right direction. 

William Fox. 

* « 

From CLIFFORD B. HAW LEY 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

The strength of "Exhibitors Herald" plus the strength of 
"Moving Picture World" will mean a publication of the first 
magnitude. I feel confident that every branch of our great 
industry will be benefited by the merger. 

Clifford B. Hawley, 

* * * 

From CARL LAEMMLE 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

The combining of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World" is an epochal step, for which you, sir, are to be con- 
gratulated. It has vast possibilities for good in the industry, 
as it unites the force and influence of the one with the view- 
point and long-established confidence in the other. The re- 
sultant publication should be a clarion, to sound the way to 
progress and betterment for the film industry. 

Carl Laemmle. 



From JESSE L. LASKY 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations on your taking over "Moving Picture 
World" and combining it with "Exhibitors Herald." It is fit- 
ting that this property should come into your hands at the 
beginning of the new year. I sincerely hope that the success 



that has attended "Exhibitors Herald" will be more than in- 
creased during the coming year in your combined publication. 

^ ^ Jesse L. Lasky. 

From JOSEPH P. KENNEDY 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Permit me to extend my congratulations, with every one 
else, on your very constructive move in consolidating the 
"World" with the "Herald." You have set a splendid ex- 
ample not only in the publication end of the field, but for the 
whole industry. I think your step is a very constructive one. 

Joseph P. Kennedy. 

* * * 

From E. W. HAMMONS 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

There is no question in my mind that, in effecting the 
merger of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World," 
you have accomplished a fine service to the industry. Com- 
bining the old established prestige of "Moving Picture 
World" with the aggressiveness and virility of "Exhibitors 
Herald" should bring about the publishing of a trade maga- 
zine that will be of greatly increased service to, and influence 
on, the motion picture business. 

The new "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World," 
reaching a vastly greater audience of exhibitors, has a finer 
opportunity and a bigger responsibility in informing, edu- 
cating, leading and inspiring them. Its ability to serve the 
advertiser, whose pages after all carry the most important 
news of the business, should be correspondingly increased. 

Your own splendid record of achievement in the past is 
the best evidence that you will be equal to this new call to 
service, with its new and bigger obligations and responsibili- 
ties. We wish you the most complete success with the new 
"Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World," while con- 
gratulating you upon bringing aEout this merger. 

E. W. Hammons. 

* * ^ 

From JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

I have just learned of the merging of "Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World." Congratulations and heartiest 
good wishes for your continued success. The combining of 
these two magazines into one marks a progressive step and 
one which the industry at large should welcome. 

Joseph M. Schenck. 

* * * 

From ELMER PEARSON 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I have read with keen interest the announcement of the 
merger of "Exhibitors Herald" with "Moving Picture World." 
The combination of Martin J. Quigley and John F. Chalmers 
as individuals, and of these two publications which have al- 
ways been among the most constructive forces in the motion 
picture industry, opens up practically unlimited possibilities 
for their own success and for the betterment of the business. 

Please accept my heartiest congratulations and best wishes, 
and also my personal thanks for the greater concentration 
in the trade journal field thus created. 

Elmer Pearson, 

* * • 

From AL CHRISTIE 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Please accept our hearty congratulations on the merging 
of two great forces in the industry in the bringing together 
of the fine journals, "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World." In the latter you have the pioneer magazine of the 
industry, which always stood for the advancement of the 
motion picture business in all lines of methods and service 
for many years and in your own outstanding magazine you 
have the progressive spirit of the times and the reader inter- 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



25 



forward step in our industry — one 



est which comes from the covering of topics of practical 
interest to the exhibitor in a fearless and unbiased manner. 
With the two publications together you should be able to 
serve the motion picture' exhibitor still further and help ad- 
vance this great industry in keeping with its present day 
importance. 

Al Christie. 

* * * 

From SAM KATZ 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations on your most recent move. 

Sam Katz. 



From HAROLD B. FRANKLIN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and PubHsher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Permit me to congratulate you on merger of "Exhibitors 
Herald and Moving Picture World." This is very construc- 
tive step in right direction and will be welcomed by entire 
industry. Let me offer my wish for your assured success. 

Harold B. Franklin. 



From COLUMBIA PICTURES 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations merger of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving 
Picture World." Under your dominant leadership will prove 
to utmost advantage of entire industry. 

Columbia Pictures Corporation. 



From JAMES R. QUIRK 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations on your latest extension of your service 
and influence to the motion picture industry. It will greatly 
increase the efficiency of the trade paper field and was a mas- 
terful stroke of publishing acumen. Your editorial force and 
sanity have always been directed toward a broader and finer 
conception of the business and the acquiring of the "World" 
will broaden the business itself and help it immeasurably in 
one of its difficult problems. 

James R. Quirk, 
Publisher, 
Photoplay Magazine. 



From WINFIELD SHEEHAN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Accept my congratulations on newest expansion of "Ex- 
hibitors Herald." I regard the acquisition of "Moving Pic- 
ture World" by you as an important forward step for the 
entire industry. Your publication has represented the best 
interests of the public who patronize moving pictures as well 
as rendering practical and authentic service for exhibitor and 
producer alike. Yours should be a happy New Year. 

Winfield Sheehan, 
Vice President and General Manager, 
Fox Film Corporation. 



From R. H. COCHRANE 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 
Great stuff. Congratulations. 



R. H. Cochrane. 



From HAL E. ROACH 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I hasten to forward my heartiest congratulations upon 
hearing of the consolidation of "Exhibitors Herald and Mov- 
ing Picture World" under your management and editorial- 
sihip. No man could be better fitted for the job than your- 
self. You possess a keen insight into the vital conditions of 
the industry and have proven yourself most helpful not only 
to the producer but to the distributor and exhibitor as well. 
The "Exhibitors Herald" has long since shown its great value 
as has also the "Moving Picture World." So under the con- 
solidation we'll look for even a bigger and better paper. 

Hal E. Roach. 



From JACK L. WARNER 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

The consolidation of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Pic- 
ture World" is a union which is bound to bring added strength 
and benefit to the motion picture industry. It means that 
two institutions whose editorial counsel has added wisdom 
to the industry have been united and such a fusion must add 
strength to the accomplishment of the purpose to be served. 

Jack L. Warner. 

* * * 

From E. V. RICHARDS, JR. 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Constructive mergers of reputable forces are always a 
public benefit. We wish the "Herald and World" a Happy 
New Year and prosperous future. 

E. V. Richards, Jr. 

* * * 

From W. RAY JOHNSTON 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Allow me to congratulate you on the combination of "Ex- 
hibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." I'm sure this 
will work out for the benefit of the whole motion picture 
industry. 

W. Ray Johnston, 
Rayart Pictures Corporation. 



From JOHN C. FLINN 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

While others were talking, you did it! Congratulations! 

John C. Flinn, 
Pathe Exchange, Inc. 



From RICHARD A. ROWLAND 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Please accept my warmest congratulations on the merger 
of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." I am 
certain that the combined publication will be of great benefit 
to the trade. 

Richard A. Rowland. 



From CECIL B. DeMILLE 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

My congratulations go to you upon the culmination of the 
greatest consolidation of motion picture trade papers. You 
have my sincere best wishes for the brilliant future I know 
the new enterprise will achieve. Nothing but the best can 
result from this new endeavor which brings together the 



24 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



bound to contribute much, indeed, 



youngster (Herald) with its progressive ideas and dominant 
spirit and the matured one (World) which has been a mighty 
factor in shaping the course of the industry. 

Cecil B. DeMille. 



interesting of trade publications. I am sure that this mer- 
ger will result in the biggest and best publication in the his- 
tory of motion picture trade papers. 

Mack Sennett. 

* * * 



From FELIX F. FEIST 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 
More power to you! Congratulations and best wishes. 

Felix F. Feist, 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 

From P. D. COCHRANE 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Your announcement pleased me more than I can say. For 
the last year the trade paper situation has been in a greater 
state of uncertainty than I can ever remember having seen 
it, and the combination of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving 
Picture World" should do a great deal to stabilize it and put 
it back on the right track. AH power to the new combina- 
tion. 

P. D. Cochrane, 
Universal Pictures Corporation. 



From SAMUEL SPRING 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

The union of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World" will be welcomed by the entire industry. We need 
strong trade publications that cover the affairs of the indus- 
try thoroughly and impartially. I know that we may count 
upon you for this service. 

Samuel Spring. 

* * * 

From WATTERSON R. ROTHACKER 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Heartiest congratulations on your achievement of combin- 
ing with "Moving Picture World." 

Watterson R. Rothacker. 



From GEORGE W. TRENDLE 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Consider merger of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World" most constructive step industry has had in m^.ny days. 
It will enable producers to concentrate advertising in two 
huge trade publications and enable exhibitor to get full in- 
formation from one source. 

George W. Trendle, Kentucky Enterprises. 



From JAMES R. GRAINGER 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Please accept my congratulations on your new venture. I 
am sure it is a step further in the right direction. 

James R. Grainger. 

* * * 

From MACK SENNETT 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Please accept my congratulations upon the merger of "Ex- 
hibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." I have been a 
steady reader of both journals and have found them the most 



From WILLIAM LeBARON 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Please accept my sincerest wishes for the success of the 
combined publications under your guidance. The consolida- 
tion of two such excellent trade papers as "Exhibitors Her- 
ald and Moving Picture World" can result in but one thing, 
and that is a stronger and more potential trade publication. 
You and Mr. Chalmers are to be congratulated on this move 
which will mean much to the motion picture industry. 

William LeBaron, 
V. P. In charge of Production, 
F B O Pictures Corporation. 



From IRVING THALBERG 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations on the consolidation of "Exhibitors Her- 
ald and Moving Picture World." These publications have 
long been important factors in the development and growth 
of the motion picture industry. The union of these two pub- 
lications marks an advancing step for the industry and is a 
tribute to you and your associates in the publishing world. 

Irving Thalberg, 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios. 



From BRUCE GALLUP 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Let me extend to you at this time, my personal congratu- 
lations as well as those of the membership of the A. M. P. A. 
for the progressive step you have just taken. 

I am sure all space buyers join with me in viewing this 
move in the same light that I do; I am sure they cdl see 
ahead of them an opportunity to spend their employers' 
money for advertising in a manner that will bring greater 
efficiency to their work. 

The A. M. P. A. and its president extend to you their best 
wishes for a most happy and contented New Year. 

Bruce Gallup, 
President, A. M. P. A. 



FroTH WM. E. TRAGSDORF 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Believe merger of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World" very good idea and of all the mergers we have been 
hearing about this is the only one which will benefit the ex- 
hibitors. Subscribed to the "World" many years before be- 
coming a "Herald" fan and the "World" had many good fea- 
tures. The combination of these two papers should prove a 
benefit to the whole industry. 

Wm. E. Tragsdorf, 
Trags theatre, Neillsville, Wis. 



From E. H. GOLDSTEIN 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

My congratulations to you, Mr. Quigley, on acquiring a 
publication which has meant so much in the moving picture 
business as the "Moving Picture World." I know that you 
will carry on its traditions and I know that with the added 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



toward the solution of those certain 



circulation strength, the "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Pic- 
ture World" will progress to still greater heights and more 
brilliant accomplishments. 

E. H. Goldstein, 
Treasurer, Universal Pictures Corporation. 



From NED E. DEPINET 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Have always appreciated the selling power of "Exhibitors 
Herald" as the medium through which to reach exhibitors. 
Consolidation with "Moving Picture World" further 
strengthens your position. Wishing you all the success that 
your enterprise as a publisher warrants. 

Ned E. Depinet, 
General Sales Manager, First National. 



From PHIL REISMAN 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

I feel that I must congratulate both you and the motion 
picture industry on the merger of "Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World." You have done an important and 
valuable thing for the industry, but only what would be ex- 
pected from one who has always been as earnest and pro- 
gressive as you have been. 

Phil Reisman, 
General Sales Manager, Pathe. 



From HERMAN ROBBINS 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Announcement of the merger of "Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World" has just come to my desk, and I 
herewith extend to you my congratulations upon this impor- 
tant consolidation. It is indicative of the progress you have 
made since your inception in the motion picture industry, 
and clearly points to the bigger and greater things you will 
accomplish in the future. 

Herman Robbins, 
General Manager, National Screen Service. 



From NAT G. ROTHSTEIN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Hearty congratulations upon the merging of "Exhibitors 
Herald and Moving Picture World." The union of two such 
powerful influences in the industry is bound to have a far- 
reaching significance. The "Exhibitor Herald" under your 
aggressive and far-sighted leadership and the "Moving Pic- 
ture World," with its veteran outlook and popularity, will 
bring together the best thought, and can provide a path-find- 
ing stimulus for the entire industry. 

Nat G. Rothstein, 
Director of Exploitation & Advertising, Universal. 



From PAUL GULICK 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Much as I mig'ht regret the passing as an individual pub- 
lication of "Moving Picture World," whose owners and edi- 
tors I have known and admired ever since I have been in 
the moving picture business, I must congratulate you on the 
way in which the amalgamation was brought about and an- 
nounced. It will strengthen the entire trade paper field and 
it v/as done in a manner such as one would expect from 
Martin Quigley. 

Paul Gulick, 
Director of Publicity, Universal. 



From CHARLES E. McCARTHY 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations! What a new year's gift to whole picture 
industry. Merger is another great victory for honesty and en- 
terprise which have been basic principles of your career. 

Charles E. McCarthy, 
Publicity Director, Paramount. 



From GLENDON ALLVINE 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Nobody now can say that this trade paper does not cover 
the field. It fairly smothers it. You have greatly simplified 
the problems of the motion picture advertiser. 

Glendon AUvine, 
Director of Advertising & Publicity, Fox. 



From FRED NIBLO 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

My sincere congratulations. Best wishes for your consoli- 
dation with the "World." 

Fred Niblo. 

* * * 

From LOU B. METZGER 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

From the sales standpoint, I congratulate you on putting 
over what looks to me like a splendid sales proposition. With 
the combined circulation of "Exhibitors Herald" and the 
"World" and the additional territory covered, the new com- 
bination should carry a strong advertising appeal. I con- 
gratulate you upon your foresight and your purchase. 

Lou B. Metzger, 
Sales Manager, Universal. 



From RUSSELL HOLMAN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 
Congratulations on amalgamation of "Herald" and "World.' 

Russell Holman, 
Advertising Director, Paramount. 



From HOWARD DIETZ 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations on your having successfully merged "Ex- 
hibitors Herald" with "Moving Picture World." I am sure 
your combined paper will prosper. 

Howard Dietz, 
Advertising & Publicity Director, M-G-M. 



From VICTOR SHAPIRO 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

The merger of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World" is indeed a wedding of two corking trade papers. Un- 
questionably, it will now enable space buyers who have 
studied the field, to purchase space as intelligently and in 
the same manner as responsible space buyers in advertising 
agencies buy for their clients. Undoubtedly your new paper 



/ 



7 



26 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



heretofore difficult problems in the 



will retain the ideals of both your organizations, and with 
the progressive policies that have dominated both hereto- 
fore, we of this organization look forward to seeing a read- 
able, interesting and thoroughly representative trade paper. 

Victor Shapiro, 
Advertising & Publicity Director, United Artists. 



inception and rejoice in consolidation which not only will 
place "Herald" foremost beyond any comparison but also 
prove of still greater indispensable value to all exhibi- 
tors everywhere. 

Fred S. Meyer, 
Managing Director, Alhambra, Milwaukee. 



From P. A. PARSONS 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

I want to congratulate you for taking a most constructive 
step in the trade paper field. The eHmination of one trade 
paper helps to clarify a situation which has been bad and 
getting progressively worse. You benefit by getting the best 
A.B.C. subscription list in the field and the prestige of a pa- 
per that has been synonjonous with the motion picture busi- 
ness for over 20 years. 

P. A. Parsons, 
Pathe Exchange, Inc. 

From M. M. RUBENS 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations on your merger which I personally con- 
sider one of the greatest economic moves of the motion pic- 
ture industry. The high tension at which the exhibiting end 
of motion pictures is now conducted makes it imperative that 
your field be covered in a compact manner. 

M. M. Rubens, 
4: « « Joliet theatres. 

From JAMES E. COSTON 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations on your consolidation with "Moving Pic- 
ture World." We believe that this move will be a great bene- 
fit to the industry in that your good work as exemphfied in 
"Exhibitors Herald" will be carried on in greater scope and 
amplification. 

James E. Coston, 
Coston Circuit, Chicago. 

From J. C. BRADY 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Personally opposed to combines. The curse of the United 
States and Canada is combinations. Five per cent of the 
population of Canada is getting rich while the other 95 per 
cent is struggling for existence on account of combines. 

J. C. Brady, 
President, Ontario Exhibitors Association. 



From CRESSON E. SMITH 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald * 
and Moving Picture World. 

Permit me to congratulate you upon the progressive move 
that you have made in consolidating the "Moving Picture 
World" with the "Exhibitors Herald." We who are from 
Chicago have always been proud of the "Herald" and of you. 

Cresson E. Smith, 
United Artists Corporation. 



From FRED S. MEYER 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

"Those profit most who serve best" unquestionably is re- 
sponsible for "Herald-World" merger. I have religiously fol- 
lowed progress and achievements of "Herald" since its 



From PHILIP RAND 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

The merger of the "Herald and World" will more perma- 
nently guarantee the exhibitor his charter of movie rights 
that is the opportunity of having his opinion printed and 
pictures reported upon. Without these the exhibitor would 
be helpless. Both magazines uphold the personal equation 
idea between exhibitor and publisher and these letters and 
reports lead to correspondence between every branch of in- 
dustry and bring all into touch. This inspires confidence in 
the magazine. This merger is bound to succeed big and give 
the trade world the one big human interest personal contact 
magazine. 

Philip Rand, 
Rex theatre, Salmon, Idaho. 

From E. J. SMITH 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

The combining of your paper with "Moving Picture 
World" is a significant epoch-making event in the motion 
picture industry. Under your leadership and guidance there 
can be no doubt that "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World" will be a powerful agency in welding together the 
exhibitors of the United States who have always looked upon 
the two publications as among the leaders in editorial 
thought. 

E. J. Smith, 
General Sales Manager, TifTany-Stahl. 



From SI GREIVER 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

After years of continuous advertising in your publication 
I can readily understand your preeminence in the field. Please 
accept my congratulations upon your latest acquisition. To 
me it is only a furtherance of your progressive policies of 
giving greater value to your advertisers and readers. 

Si Greiver, 
Greiver Productions. 

* * * 

From RAY L. HALL 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I have your notification of the consolidation of "Exhibitors 
Herald and Moving Picture World." I presume that this 
means an expansion of the Quigley Publishing Company, and 
in that believe me I extend my congratulations! It is a 
pleasure to know that you are to be at the head of this con- 
solidation because it means progress and aggressiveness. 

Ray L. Hall, 
Editor, Pathe News. 

* * * 

From CLYDE W. ECKHARDT 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Please allow me to offer my congratulations and best 
wishes for the complete success of the consolidation of "Ex- 
hibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." I am quite 
certain this is the most important event in late years in the 
progress of motion picture trade papers. I know that with 
the same intelligent leadership for the two combined papers 
that you gave to the "Exhibitors Herald" it will prove of 
great benefit to the motion picture industry. I am also con- 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



27 



business of motion pictures 




fident if the same conservativeness and elimination of over- 
production is practiced in the building of theatres, with 
added seating capacity, and decreased over-production is 
exercised, as in this particular instance, there would be ample 
profits and prosperity to go all the way 'round. 

Clyde W. Eckhardt, 
Fox Film Corporation. 



From JULIUS STERN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

It is a great pleasure for me to wish you good luck in your 
new venture. The amalgamation of two such influences for 
good in the motion picture industry, as "Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World" have been, means more than 
double the possibilities for progressive leadership. The new 
publication should point the way toward a solution of the 
many problems facing this industry; first, because of its 
enlarged scope and power, and second, because of your far- 
seeing direction. You have forged a worthy blade, fit for 
any fight. The industry looks to you. 

Julius Stern. 

From A. L. SELIG 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

It was with a great deal of interest that I heard of the 
merger of two such admirable publications as "Moving Pic- 
ture World and Exhibitors Herald." This merger is, I think, 
of utmost significance to the entire industry and shows, on 
your part, a laudable effort to bring to a basis of stabilization 
one of the vital branches of the motion picture industry. 
Here's success to the man who has the courage of his con- 
victions! 

A. L. Selig, 
Advertising & Publicity Director, 
Tiffany- Stahl. 

From J. A.GOVE 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I have just seen the announcement of your taking over the 
"Moving Picture World." This is a long step in the right 
direction. More and more power to you. 

J. A. Gove, 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 

^ 4: 

From BENO RUBEL 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

It is great news, indeed, to hear that "Exhibitors Herald" 
and "Moving Picture World" have been merged and will be 
published as a greater trade paper under your forceful direc- 
tion. The new publication has unlimited possibilities in en- 
couraging, advising and influencing the industry along the 
paths of progress. I am sure it will do just these things. 
Your record assures it. 

Beno Rubel, 
Universal Pictures Corporation. 



gradual absorption of practically every publication in that 
industry by the Electrical World and its publishers, the Mc- 
Graw-Hill Company. In every case it was a fortunate and 
beneficial move for all concerned and has resulted in one 
outstanding publication for every branch of the industry. For 
instance, instead of perhaps five or 10 separate publications 
in the operating and business end of the industry, we now 
have the Electrical World which covers everything much 
better than it was ever covered before and has almost reached 
the position of the New Testament in authority. 

You have made the initial step and you are to be congratu- 
lated for your foresight in doing so. 

However, I hope this will be rather the beginning than the 
end and that other publications will come into the fold so 
as to present to the readers and advertisers one strong, au- 
thoritative and well-entrenched publication that can properly 
and fearlessly present all of the news and all of the develop- 
ments of this mighty industry. 

Irving Samuels, 
President, Automatic Devices Company. 



From W. P. GARYN 
Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Have just learned that "Exhibitors Herald" is merging 
with "Moving Picture World" and I herewith extend to you 
my heartiest congratulations on this important move. To 
me, it seems a very big thing and I am sure that the combi- 
nation of these two representative trade papers means that 
the new publication will be the most important in the motion 
picture field. 

W. P. Garyn, 
Assistant Sales Manager, 
National Screen Service, Inc. 



From M. E. COMERFORD 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Your New Year announcement that you purchased "Mov- 
ing Picture World" and that you will combine it with "Ex- 
hibitors Herald" is indeed very indicative of the wonderful 
progress you are making. Your efforts in our business have 
been productive of much real good for the industry, as the 
work has always been along constructive lines. 

M. E. Comerford, 
Comerford Theatres, Inc. 



From KENNETH FITZPATRICK 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

It was certainly with much pleasure that the writer read 
in the last issue of "Exhibitors Herald" the announcement 
of the merger of "Moving Picture World" with your paper. 
With the much broader scope this gives you, added to the 
splendid organization with which you have surrounded your- 
self, I know you will make this larger trade paper an even 
greater help to the theatre owners and managers, as well as 
all other branches of our industry. 

Kenneth Fitzpatrick, 

Fitzpatrick & McElroy. 



From IRVING SAMUELS 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I am just in receipt of your announcement with reference 
to the consolidation of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Pic- 
ture World" and I want to take this opportunity of con- 
gratulating you on what I consider a very significant move in 
the trade paper field. 

For one with no interest in trade papers except as an ad- 
vertiser and reader, I believe I have used (probably wasted) 
more conversation and arguments in favor of just such a 
consolidation than any one else in the industry. My previous 
training had been in the electrical field and I had seen the 



From JOHN McCORMICK 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Returning from location today just read with delight your 
interesting announcement of merger. At our studio luncheon 
round table everyone unanimous in belief it is splendid con- 
structive step and especially so because your good self and 
your policies will be at helm. Heartiest congratulations in 
which Colleen (Moore) joins and we wish for the new "Her- 
ald-World" all possible success and in which we hope now 
and then to have some little part. 

John McCormick, 
Producer, Colleen Moore Productions. 



28 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



mm 

NEW YORK— Paul Gulick is lamenting be- 
cause he bought himself some nice red 
golf balls and can't get any snow to play 
them on, so has to use the ordmary white 
ones. . . . Jerry Beatty sat in on his new job 
at First National yesterday and spent the first 
day deciding what office he could use without 
disturbing anyone. . . . William Le Baron, 
F B O production head, is due in New York 
this week for a stay of about a month. . . 
Jimmy Grainger, having spent the holidays m 
New York getting acquainted with his family, 
is planning to again take up his abode m 
sleeping cars. . . . Harold Franklin is due here 
this week, and then look out for big stories 
of big theatre mergers, whether Franklin says 
anything or not. . . . Manfred Lee, m charge 
of Sterling advertising and publicity for the 
past year, has resigned and will take up 
writing as a vocation. . . . Will Hays spent 
the holidays at his home in Sullivan, Ind. . . . 
Dr. Hugo Riesenfeld, according to persistent 
rumor, will soon take charge of the Rivoli, 
but the best bet is that he will supervise 
the management of all theatres in which 
United Artists is interested. . . . Vtman Moses, 
who spent the holidays at his home m the 
South, is due back in New York this week 
and an announcement of his future activities 
is expected, and whatever his connection is 
this column hopes it is a good one. . . . Fred 
Quimby says he is getting tired spiking rumors 
that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer is planning to 
quit the newsreel field. . . . Lou Metsger, back 
from the South fully recovered, says he is 
going to keep in condition even if he has to 
train down to 250 pounds. . . . Ben Abrams, 
away for the holidays, left his office m the 
Astor lobby open for the use of his friends. 

Lee Ochs says that inasmuch as he and 
Lou Metsger are both on the membership 
committee of the Motion Picture Club, he 
hopes the club will provide a large com- 
mittee room. . . . Frank Wilstach, who fell 
heir to Jerry Beatty's job at the Hays office, 
reported Monday and then waited until his 
boss got home to find out what he is to do. 

. Artie Stebbins, having garnered about 
all the insurance money on the West Coast, 
is expected home soon to see what has accu- 
mulated here during his absence. . . . Roxy 
gave Brno Rapee a dinner last week with a 
handsome watch as dessert, in commemoration 
of the ten years they have been working to- 
gether. . . . C. V. Hake, of F B O, has re- 
turned to New York after a prolonged trip 
through Central America. . . . Eddie Smith, 
general sales manager of Tiffany-Stahl, has 
appointed Harry Gibbs as special representa- 
tive, working out of the New York office. 
. . . Joe Rock is due here this week, so get 
your sore lip healed up and be ready to laugh 
at Joe's new stories. . . . Dr. A. H. Giannini 
was named by President Al Lichtman as 
chairman of the finance committee of the 
Motion Picture Club, and if the genial 
doctor doesn't know all about finance, who 
does?— SPARGO. 



Children's Frolic Week 
at the New York Capitol 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4.— Last week was 
"Children's Paradise Week" at the Capitol. 
Each morning 100 youngsters from various 
settlement houses and welfare organizations 
were admitted free, and Thursday morning the 
whole house was thrown open to the Child's 
Welfare League, for the annual special 
Christmas show. 



Paramount in the Land of Cheops 



"VTEARLY 5,000 years ago the Pharaoh Cheops built the first Pyramid, and it has endured 
■'■ ^ a symbol of Egyptian culture. Then the path of progress passed beyond the Nile, and 
to modern Civilization, Egypt is a land remote, remembered for her past. Yet her 4,000,000 
people make Egypt a fair field for Western commerce, and as one result, proud Pyramids of 
dead Pharaohs stand not far distant froni glittering palaces of the motion picture. 





To the theatres of Egypt, pictures are 
distributed largely by camel. Above is 
shown a Paramount cargo leaving the 
Cairo film vault. 



Paramount pictures passing the 
Sphinx. Hundreds of miles are often 
thus covered to take Clara Bow to 
her admirers. 




Paramount's staff at the Cairo exchange. Through them the 30 theatres of Egypt and 
the 27 theatres of Syria and Ptilestine are served. "Action pictures" is what their 
patrons call for, declares G. Dumarteau, manager. He is shown above, seated in 
the center. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



29 



Al Smith Denounces Censors; 
Demands Statute Be Repealed 



Admission Tax Bill 
to Be Delayed Until 
April 15th or Later 

( special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 4— The net result 
of the radical tax cuts made by the House of 
Representatives in passing the tax reduction 
bill will be to delay application of the in- 
creased exemption for admissions until April 
rS or later, it is indicated by correspondence 
between Senator Reed Sraoot of Utah, chair- 
man of the Senate finance committee, and Sec- 
retary of the Treasury Mellon. 

"On the assumption that a tax reduction 
bill will become law at the present session of 
Congress, delay will occasion no loss to the 
taxpayers, or inconvenience either to them or 
to the Government from an administrative 
standpoint," Secretary Mellon commented. 



Emily M, Stevens, Screen 
and Stage Actress, Dies 
After Dose of Narcotic 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4.— Emily M. Stevens, 
actress, was found dead in mysterious cir- 
cumstances Monday in her apartment here. 
The report of detectives, entered at police 
headquarters five hours after the body had 
been found, declared she had died of an over- 
dose of narcotics. 

Dr. Milton J. Wilson was summoned to the 
apartment. He notified the medical examiner's 
office and detectives were assigned to investi- 
gate. 

Dr. Wilson was one of several physicians 
and specialists who had been treating the ac- 
tress for some time. For several years she 
had been a victim of nervous disorders. On 
Sunday, it was said, she had suffered a nervous 
attack. 

Miss Stevens was 42 years old and a niece 
of another popular actress, Mrs. Minnie Mad- 
dern Fiske. She was born in New York City. 

Besides acting in a number of stage plays, 
including "Within the Law" and "The Un- 
chastened Woman," she appeared in films for 
the World Film Products Corporation and 
other independent producers. 



May Attack Brookhart Bill 
for Clause on Unmade Film 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ALBANY, N. Y., Jan. 4.— When the Al- 
bany Film Board of Trade meets January 9, 
the Brookhart bill recently introduced at 
Washington will come in for considerable 
discussion, with the possibility that the board 
may go on record as opposed to it. Mem- 
bers of the board are outspoken against a pro- 
vision to the effect that pictures can not be 
sold to exhibitors until they have actually been 
made. 



John Mattice, Manager, 
Dies at Middleburgh, N, Y, 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

MIDDLEBURGH, N. Y., Jan. 4.— John 
Mattice, 51, manager of the Novelty theatre, 
died here recently of pneumonia. 



Must Cease Throttling 
Freedom, Says Executive 

Slash in Salaries of Ontario Censors Considered, With 
Restriction of Authority Proposed in Legislature 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 
ALBANY, Jan. 4. — Condemnation of motion picture censorship was sounded 
in emphatic language by Governor Alfred E. Smith in presenting his annual 
message to the 200 members of the New York State legislature at noon today. 

Ideals Trodden Under Foot 

The governor's message was approximately 35,000 words, probably the long- 
est ever delivered by a governor of New York state, in addressing the legislature 
upon its opening day. It was his eighth, and in his own words "the last annual 
message," which he will present. 



Relative to motion picture censorship, Gov- 
ernor Smith said : 

"In the hectic days following the close of 
the war, under the false impression that we 
were protecting the ideals of our government, 
some of them were trodden under foot. In 
the mad rage for what was thought necessary 
for our protection, we attempted to throttle 
freedom of speech. The sanctity of the field 
of education was invaded, by requiring private 
schools to be licensed by the state in order 
that we might censor the doctrines taught 
by them. 

"A censorship over moving pictures 
was set up and permitted an agency of 
the state to condemn before the fact. We 
were on the high road to the ruthless 
trampling down of the rights of minori- 
ties, forgetting that we had upon our 
statute books abundant laws for the 
punishment of those who either by act or 
by speech threatened the upheaval of the 
orderly processes of government. 
"But the sound, well groomed commonsense 
of the rank and file of our people demanded 
the repeal of these statutes in 1923, and they 
were remtived from the statute books with 
my hearty executive approval just as the state 
was entering upon the greatest era of pros- 
perity in its history. 

Demands Censor Bill Repeal 
"One, however, still remains, and that is 
the state's censorship of moving pictures. 
While I am satisfied that it should be removed 
from the statute books, I am equally satisfied 
that the state should proceed with all the force 
and vigor it can bring to its command with the 
prosecution of anybody who offends against 
public decency or pollutes the youth by the 
exhibition of improper or indecent moving 
pictures." 



Motion picture censorship became effective 
in New York state during the late summer of 
1921, following passage of a bill in both 
houses which became one of the outstanding 
featurs of that year's session. With the con- 
vening of the legislature each year that has 
followed, unsuccess'ful attempts have been 
made to wipe motion picture censorship from 
the laws of New York state. 

Nationwide Bearing Now 

The censorship law has been generally re- 
garded as a Republican measure, and for that 
reason politics: has entered largely into any 
attempt on the part of Governor Smith toward 
eliminating censorship from the Empire State. 

In view of the fact that Governor Smith is 
today a national figure and may become the 
Democratic party's candidate a few months 
hence for presidential honor, his declaration 
on motion picture censorship in this city today 
has a nationwide bearing. 



Propose Pay Cut for Ontario 
Censors and Restricted Duties 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

OTTAWA, Jan. 4.— There is a strong hint 
that the motion picture censorship situation 
in the Province of Ontario will undergo con- 
siderable change during 1928. 

One feature that is to be considered by the 
Ontario government calls for a reduction in 
the salaries of the Ontario censors, cutting 
the chairman's pay from $3,500 to $3,000, and 
other members from $2,500 to $1,800, it is 
declared in government circles at Toronto. 
There is also a suggestion that the actual ex- 
amination of moving pictures will undergo 
a change in that all subjects will not be sub- 
mitted to the censor board. 



Wrigley Chain Theatre Move Is Denied; 

Builds Two Houses as Civic Enterprises 

Rumors that William Wrigley, Jr., is entering the motion picture theatre Beld 
on a large scale were denied Tuesday in Chicago by P. K. Wrigley, son of the 
gum manufacturer, and S. C. Stewart of the Stewart-Davis Advertising Agency, 
Chicago representatives of the Catalina company which handles a number of 
projects on Catalina Island off California. 

William Wrigley, Jr., owns stock in a theatre project at Lake Geneva, Wis., in 
which a number of others, including Sidney Smith, the cartoonist, with summer 
homes at the lake resort also are interested, but it is purely a civic enterprise to 
give the summer colony an up-to-the-minute theatre, P. K. Wrigley said. 

Likewise at Catalina Island, William Wrigley, Jr., was instrumental in giving 
the resort city a modern theatre but this also was a civic move, Mr. Stewart de- 
clared. He denied that Mr. Wrigley was interested in having a chain of theatres, 
• including the Teatro del Lago, atmospheric theatre in Chicago. Mr. Stewart added, 
"Mr. Wrigley is not in the theatre business." 



30 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



Exhibitors Qlad Patrons^ Tastes 
Show Variety at Portland^ Ore. 

Some of Best Pictures Artistically Prove Poorest Financially, Summary 
of Years Business Reveals to City's Showmen 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 

PORTLAND, ORE., Jan. 4. — If any proof were needed that it takes per- 
sons with all sorts of tastes to make up this world, it would be found in 
the returns of the motion picture houses, whose managers are thankful 
that Portlanders do not all prefer the same type of screen entertainment — else 
some weeks the houses would be empty — and some film actors would be lost 
in limbo. 



Re-Takes 



A BACKWARD glance at the large first- 
run houses — Rivoli, Broadway, Colum- 
bia, Liberty and Blue Mouse — shows that 
Portlanders have had opportunity to see 
some of the most important pictures of the 
year, and that some of the supposedly best 
features, artistically, have been the poor- 
«st financially. Indeed, it is almost sur- 
prising to the managers when a film they 
•consider "wonderful" has a favorable box 
office response. 

A cross-section of the theatre taste in 
Portland is shown by the following re- 
turns for 1927 from the film houses whose 
managers have given a few hints as to 
what we may see in 1928: The out- 
standing picture at the Rivoli was 
"Chang" and this also proved an amaz- 
ing financial success. ■ "The Big Parade" 
was a "gigantic success financially" and 
is classed as one of the best attractions 
of the year. John Barrymore, as "The 
Beloved Rogue," did not draw, nor did 
Harold Lloyd's "Kid Brother," from a 
box office standpoint. 
The Columbia theatre received the best 
reaction from the following pictures, which 
show that its patrons are diversified in their 
tastes: "The Way of All Flesh," "The Cat 
and Canary," "Flesh and the Devil," "Res- 
urrection," and "Metropolis" and "Les 
Miserables" for two weeks. "Resurrection" 
ran three weeks in the heat of summer. 
For a single week's business, "Beau Geste" 
holds the record. Many patrons of this 
theatre have season tickets. 

Comedy Favored at Broadway 
A good box office return is received at 
the Broadway when the pictures feature 
Clara Bow, Richard Dix, Lon Chaney, John 
Gilbert, Richard Barthelmess or Colleen 
Moore. Comedy is the great favorite, and 
"The Callahans and Murphys" gave the 
largest financial return for any picture dur- 
ing 1927, with "Rookies" and "Two Arabian 
Knights" running close. Fanchon and Marco 
attractions, which accompany each program, 
have become larger in the last year. "My 
Best Girl' for Christmas week proved most 
popular. 

The Liberty, after having been closed 
for many months, reopened in September 
on a new basis, with good vaudeville shar- 



ing equal place with motion pictures. Man- 
ager Rice has put in a number of innova- 
tions, including the Eight Liberty Girls, 
which have put the house on a better finan- 
cial footing. 

With "Don Juan," which was at the Blue 
Mouse beginning the latter part of March, 
was introduced the Vitaphone. "The Bet- 
ter 'Ole" had a five-weeks run, and "The 
Missing Link" ran two weeks. The Christ- 
mas offering was "Ham and Eggs at the 
Front," with Vitaphone and Movietone. 



South African Circuit 
Begins Large Building 
Expansion Development 

Kinemas, Ltd., Now Has 15 Thea- 
tres; Will Have 22 by 
End of Year 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LONDON, Jan. 4. — Kinemas, Ltd., which 
has begun the development of a theatre cir- 
cuit and distribution in South Africa, has 
embarked upon a building program which will 
add three first run key city theatres to its 
circuit within the coming year. At present 
the company operates 15 theatres and a renting 
circuit ; and the number will be increased to 
approximately 22 by the end of this year. 

The largest of the new houses will be 
erected in Johannesburg at a cost of approxi- 
mately $500,000 and a $400,000 appropriation 
has been made for a theatre in Pretoria. 
Another theatre is contemplated for Kimberley 
to cost $350,000. In addition to the first run 
theatres, four houses will be opened in the 
suburbs of Cape Town during April and an- 
other house will be added to the circuit in the 
suburbs of Pretoria. 



Million Dollar Puhlix 
House Begun in Knoxville 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Pictttre World) 

KNOXVILLE, Jan. 4.— Publix has let a 
contract for the construction of a million dol- 
lar theatre here to be known as the "Tennes- 
see." Work will start at once. 



Inspiration Gets Three -Year Franchise 

To Release Six Through United Artists 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 4. — Inspiration Pictures has been granted a three-year 
releasing franchise in United Artists, through an arrangement between Joseph M. 
Schenck, president of United Artists, and Walter Camp, Jr., president of Inspira- 
tion. 

Camp also has been voted a member of the board of directors of the Art Cinema 
Corporation, which is a film financing organization headed by Schenck and affil- 
iated with the United Artists Corporation. 

During the life of the franchise Inspiration plans to release at least six produc- 
tions through United Artists, according to J. Boyce Smith, treasurer and general 
manager of Inspiration. On tihe West Coast Victor and Edward Halperin head the 
first unit to produce in conjunction with Inspiration and release through United 
Artists. The Halperin brothers will function along the same lines as Edwin 
Carewe has during the past two years, being an associate producer with Inspira- 
tion. Both Schenck and Boyce Smith expressed delight at the arrangement. 



HO'LLYWOOD.— Happy New Year, every- 
body ! 

Made a lot of resolutions which we're going 
to keep this year. Ain't going to throw snow- 
balls at cops along Hollywood boulevard, nor 
smoke over 16 packs of cigarets a day. 

* * * 

I see the Film Daily is wishing everybody 
a Merry Xmas this year "and 365 days of 
prosperity during 1928." As there's 366 days 
in 1928 I suppose we'll have to struggle along 
that extra day without any extra help. 
^ ^ 
Speak Up 

If there is any star in Hollywood who 
hasn't posed beside one of the new Fords, 
we'd like to know it. Maybe we can arrange 
to borrow one long enough to accommodate 
you. 

* * * 

New Year Thought 

Life is just one worry after another, isn't 
it? One no more than gets the Christmas bills 
cleaned up than the Income Tax man comes 
around. 

Don't Last Long 

Henry Ford says the new model A car is 
so well made that no one ought to have to 
buy a second one. But then Henry never 
piloted one of his model A cars around Holly- 
wood, the city of bent fenders and mud- 
guards. 

* * * 

Wonderful Discoveries 

One of the big discoveries of 1927 was 
made by the Federal Trade Commission. It 
discovered block booking and learned all 
about it. 

* * * 
Two Openings 

Two openings last week brought the dress 
suit out of the newspapers where it is care- 
fully housed against the moths. The United 
Artists opened one of its chain of theatres 
down on Broadway and had all the elite of 
filmdom there. John Barrymore spoke through 
"an inverted cuspidor," as he called the 
microphone, and "Our Mary" dedicated the 
house in a manner that delighted the fans. 
Then Al Jolson came to town to see "The 
Jazz Singer" (for the 50th time) at the Cri- 
terion. We saw the picture without the 
Vitaphone some months ago but Al's songs 
certainly add immeasurably to the picture's 
enjoyment with that device. And CofTee Dan's 
place came in for a great boost and every- 
body went over there afterwards to pound 
on the tables with hammers and order ham 
and eggs. 



Meadows, when is the weather going to 
clear up? Want to try out my golf sticks 
Santa brought me. • — R. M. 



Talmadge Is Shifted to 
Butter field Saginaw House 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ADRIAN, MICH., Jan. 4.— Kenneth Tal- 
madge, manager of the Croswell and Family 
theatres in this city since the acquisition of 
the two local properties by the W. S. Butter- 
field interests, has received a New Year's 
present from his employers in the form of 
an assignment to the management of the new 
Temple theatre in Saginaw. 

Talmadge came here the first of October 
and in the short time he has directed the 
operation of the two houses has established 
a number of new business records. He will 
be succeeded here by Ellsworth Hamer, who 
will take charge Sunday. 



January 7, 1928 



EXEUBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



31 



Increase Advertising to Push B. O. 



Bandits Return to 
Mainstreet; Flee 



Texas Exhibitors Get Set 
For Best Exploitation Year 



With $10, 000 Loot Theatre Owners, Queried on Plans to Increase Receipts 

in 1928 y Disclose Many Business-Getter Ideas 



(Special lo Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

KANSAS CITY, Jan. 4.— Bandits do come 
back. At least they did at the Mainstreet 
theatre, and it cost the management $10,000, 
which represented the receipts of Saturday, 
Sunday and RTonday. 

Two bandits recently kidnapped Taylor 
Myers, manager, and took him to the theatre 
in an attempt to force him to open the safe. 
Myers told the bandits there was a time-lock 
on the safe and that it would sound an alarm 
if opened. "We'll come back again," re- 
sponded one of the bandits. 

Monday night the bandits entered the busi- 
ness office while the show was in progress 
and, while a house full of patrons were 
getting a thrill out of a' motion picture, the 
bandits walked through the long lobby and 
out into the street with the loot. 



Loss $30,000 When Flames 
Raze Theatre; Two Houses 
In Northern N. Y, Opened 

( special to Exhibitors Herald , and 
Moving Picture World) 

ALBANY, N. Y., Jan. 4.— Two new thea- 
tres were opened in northern New York dur- 
ing the past week, and one theatre was burned 
to the ground. 

Robbins and Lumberg, of Utica, opened the 
Uptown theatre in that city December 29. 
Several from Albany's film row were present. 
The house cost $200,000, has a seating capac- 
ity of 1,600, and ranks as one of the finest 
residential district theatres in central New 
York. The owners are oldtimers in the busi- 
ness, Nate Robbins having been at the head of 
a chain of houses in Watertown, Utica and 
Syracuse, which he disposed of to the Schine 
interests. Lew Fischer opened his new theatre 
in Cambridge last week. 

The Victory theatre in Newton Falls, opera- 
ted by Leonard and Cheney, was totally de- 
stroyed by fire one night. The theatre was a 
part of a business block which included a gen- 
eral store and meat market. The loss was 
about $30,000. The origin of the fire is not 
known. 



$700,000 Melbourne House 
Opens; 3 New in Sydney 

{Washington Bureau of Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.— Three thou- 
sand invited guests were present at the 
opening of the $700,000 Palais motion pic- 
ture theatre in Melbourne, Australia. The 
picture was Fox's "7th Heaven." 

Three suburban theatres recently opened 
in Sydney are the Strathfield Cinema, St. 
Peters and Enfield Cinema. 



Niece of Jacob Lourie to 
Wed Edw. Canter Sunday 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ROXBURY, MASS., Jan. 4.— The marriage 
of Miss Ruth Roberts', niece of Jacob Lourie, 
president of the New England Theatres Cor- 
poration of Boston, to Edward Canter, will 
take place at the Lourie home here Sunday. 



(Hotv can box office receipts be increased in 1928? This problem of the 
exhibitor, and how he intends to solve it, will be the subject of a series of 
special articles from all parts of the country. The following, from San An- 
tonio, is the first of the series.) 

SAN ANTONIO, Jan. 4. — Exhibitors of Texas have some very intensive 
plans for increasing business in 1928. New ideas and many interesting busi- 
ness-getting plans will be applied by local managers. 

Night Club Planned in Theatre 

One of the newest projects to be inaugurated in San Antonio, it is rumored,, 
will be the establishment of a night club in the basement of the Aztec theatre. 
Manager William Epstein plans to make this innovation a real business-getter 
— so they say. It is not known at the present exactly what plans are going to 
be used on this stunt, but that it will be started is practically a certainty. 



William O'Hare, manager of the Princess 
theatre, San Antonio, a two-a-week house, 
says that his exploitation ideas will be lim- 
ited to trick stunts and lobby hoakum. 
O'Hare is noted for his many interesting 
lobby displays. Recently, on various pic- 
tures, he has staged such stunts as cowboy 
roping exhibitions, lingerie sales, a display 
of San Antonio's first "Rough Rider" — an 
old horsecar — and many other attention- 
getting gags. 

Centers on Newspaper Ads 

E. J. Bresendine, Manager of the Empire, 
San Antonio, plans to make the best of his 
small advertising budget and devote his 
campaigns almost exclusively to newspaper 
and lobby exploitation. The Empire is a 
three-a-week house and responds more to 
this type of advertising than to any other 
form, as has been proved by many attempts 
to stabilize a patronage through other 
means. 

James Owen Cherry, manager of the 
Metropolitan, Houston; K R. Foerste, of 
Loew's State, and Eddie Breamer, man- 
ager of Interstate's Majestic, plan to ex- 
ert a maximum amount of energy toward 
outside advertising, using one's, six's and 
twenty-four's. Houston probably is billed 
better than any other city in Texas and 
these three men will see to it in 1928 lluit 
theatrical bill posting in that city tvill 
not lose any momentum. 
In Dallas, Al Mason, manager of the 
Palace, will interest himself and the theatre 
stafif in public events and civic affairs, in 
1928. Mason is extremely popular in the 
City of the Hour and whenever he becomes 
connected with any civic occurrence it is 
always successful from the theatre stand- 



point. Aiason is noted for his ability to 
exploit the Palace successfully, where vari- 
ous other managers would be afraid to gO' 
in and tread. 

Foreign and Civic Elements 

Bob Blair, resident manager of the Texas 
theatre of San Antonio, will devote the 
greater part of the first half of 1928 to- 
foreign element and civic organization ex- 
ploitation. Blair and the Texas staff are 
now engaged in a tremendous and far- 
reaching campaign among the various for- 
eign elements of San Antonio, including the 
Spanish, German and Italian. Plans now 
are being made to inaugurate a weekly so- 
ciety night at the Texas whereby members 
of the social set will be photographed and 
their pictures run on the screen and in the 
Publix Review, the thirty-page house organ 
of the Texas theatre. Civic organizations 
in San Antonio have always been good in 
cooperating with the Texas, and Blair says- 
he will cash in on their friendship during^ 
the coming season. 

Theatre managers of the South, when 
asked to state their plans for the 1928 sea- 
son, are very general in their replies, very 
few having specific campaigns worked out 
in detail — but they all have come to under- 
stand, during the past year, that advertising- 
is the medium that fills box office coffers. 
They all agree that the coming year will 
see radical changes in methods of exploita- 
tion and are all set to shoot the limit. 



Bowes Repeats "Around the Corner" 

NEW YORK. — When Major Bowes of the Capitol 
read a poem over the air last year entitled, "Around 
the Corner," thousands of requests for it were later 
received, and so the Major again read it for part of 
this New Year's eve program. 



Pathe Leads BasketbaU League 

NEW YORK.— Pathe took the lead in the Motion 
Picture Basketball league by a victory over Metro- 
Gold-wyn, 27-26. 



St. Louis Jews Protest '^King of Kings" 

Tends to Increase Race Hatred, Is Claim 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 

ST. LOUIS, Jan. 4. — The St. Louis Council of the American Jewish Congress 
has issued an appeal and resolution that "The King of Kings" be withdrawn from 
the screen on the grounds that "it is inaccurate and tends to intensify racial 
hatred." 

A. Rosenthal, editor of the Modern View, the leading Jewish periodical of the 
Central West, in a leading editorial entitled "Commercializing Jesus Christ," also 
assailed the picture and in part says, "the truth is that the marvelous spectacle 
( for such it is ) is a magnificent commercial venture, in which Jesus Christ is cruci- 
fied twice daily at 2:15 and 8:15 p. m. (and the Jewish people as well) for the 
sole and specific enrichment of producers!" 



32 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



TO WORLD READERS 

Service departments of MOVING PICTURE WORLD will be found on the following pages of this issue of EXHIBITORS HERALD and 



MOVING PICTURE W^ORLD: 

"Selling the Picture to the Public" 64 

"Through the Box Office Window" 61 

"Quick Reference Picture Chart" 69 

"Better Projection" 50 

"Little Pictures with the Big Punch" 47 

"Hollywood" 40 

"Straight from the Shoulder Reports" 79 

"Live News from Coast to Coast" 46 

"This Week and Next" 36 

"Stage and Pit" 52 



Fox Prepares 100 Million Budget 
For Five -Year Film Program 

Twelve Special Productions Each Season Planned — Soundproof Studios 
Finished for Greater Use of Movietone 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4. — One hundred million dollars is the amount to be 
spent by Fox Films on a five-year production program, the home office 
announced last week. This sum will include cost of plays, novels, 
short stories, originals, talent, directorial salaries and all production expendi- 
tures in the Hollywood, Fox Hills and New York studios. 



BESIDES the big productions already 
completed for that schedule many 
other pictures are about to go into work 
under personal supervision of Winfield 
Sheehan, vice president and general man- 
ager. 

Completed productions which are to 
be shown in "legit" theatres here include 
''The Street Angel," "Four Sons" and 
"Mother Machree." F. W. Murnau's 
"Sunrise," now showing at the Times 
Square in New York, Carthay Circle in 
Hollywood and Capitol in Berlin, will be 
given general release in August or S'lp- 
tember. 

Other productions of this caliber now in 
work are "The 4 Devils," "The Red 
Dancer of Moscow" and "Hangman's 
House." Besides these, the following have 
been started or finished: "Fazil," "Mother 
Knows Best," "Speakeasy," "White Silence," 
■"Pigskin," "Plastered in Paris," "Lipstick," 
"Don't Marry" and "The Dollar Princess." 

For the latter it is planned to use Movie- 
tone. Special soundproof studios already 
have been completed. 

Twelve special attractions of roadshow 
rating are planned for each year, one to be 
released each month in the five coming sea- 
sons. Preliminary plans for the 1928-29 
year are practically complete. For 1929-30 
the three outstanding pictures will be "The 
Cock-Eyed World," with Victor McLaglen 
and Edmund Lowe; "Blossom Time," 
which probably will be made in Movietone, 
and "The Mud Turtle," which Murnau will 
direct. Murnau now is making "The 4 
Devils." 

Greater use of Movietone is to be a part 



of the enlarged program. The synchro- 
nization device now is being employed with 
a weekly newsreel and with regular issues 
of short entertainment. 

Validity of Film Tax in 
New South Wales Argued 

(Washington Bureau of Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.— Whether the 
New South Wales Act imposing an import 
tax on motion picture films is valid has not 
yet been answered by the high court, states 
a report from Assistant Trade Commissioner 
Chas. F. Baldwin, Sydney. 

On November 25, by a majority, it ruled 
that it was impossible in the present state of 
the pleadings to make any conclusive order, 
and it gave the parties leave to amend the 
pleadings so that the case could be argued 
afresh. An injunction prevents the commis- 
sioner from proceeding on the film tax as- 
sessments. 

Nine F-N Films Booked 
In Chicago for January 

Nine First National productions have been 
booked into four theatres in Chicago in First 
National Month, which began Christmas Day 
and closes February 4. The theatres are the 
Chicago, Oriental, McVickers and Roosevelt. 

It is stated from the home office of First 
National that the branch mianager who wins 
first place in the sales drive will receive a 
loving cup and a trip to New York. 



U'A to Acquire 4th 
Interest in Circuit of 
Great Britain Houses 

( special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4. — Arrangements have 
been made by United Artists Theatre Circuit, 
Inc., to acquire approximately a fourth inter- 
est in The New Standard Film Co., Ltd., a 
British company being organized to take over 
a block of shares representing control of 
Provincial Cinematograph Theatres, Ltd. The 
British group will hold a controlling interest, 
and is composed of Lord Beaverbrook and 
his associates, including Lord Ashfield, Sir 
William Jury, Major Andrew P. Holt and 
William Evans. 

The circuit operates a chain of some 110 
theatres embracing practically all the larger 
cities of the United Kingdom as well as the 
smaller cities. The circuit is steadily increas- 
ing the number of its theatres under a 
building program calculated to seat, a year 
hence, 1,750,000 persons every week. United 
Artists pictures have hitherto been regularly 
shown in the theatres of the circuit. 



Police Force Blue Law on 
Toronto New Yearns Eve; 
Forget It in Other Cities 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

OTTAWA, Jan. 4.— Police authorities in 
Toronto were rather severe in their attitude 
toward theatre managers in the holding of 
New Year's Eve celebrations. The order was 
issued that all theatres and dance halls were 
to be closed sharp on the stroke of midnight, 
December 31, and this order was carried out 
by police constables at the amusement centers. 

A different situation prevailed in Montreal 
and other cities of Quebec, where the mid- 
night shows ran well into the small hours 
without restriction. At Hull, Quebec, the per- 
formances at the Laurier and Eden theatres 
did not warm up until midnight, but continued 
then at a lively rate for two hours. 

The authorities at Ottawa, Ontario, also 
allowed leeway with the result that the 
frolics at the Regent and Imperial theatres 
were conducted as arranged. 

McNevin Entitled to Lease 
on Sipe House, Court Rules 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

INDIANAPOLIS, Jan. 4.— Judge John 
Marshall in circuit court at Kokomo, Ind., has 
refused to oust H. G. McNevin, owner of the 
lease on the Sipe theatre there in the suit 
of McNevin against George Sipe for posses- 
sion of the house. 



Skouras Brothers Get Option on Purchase 
of Missouri Theatre Building in St. Louis 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture IVorld) 

ST. LOUIS, Jan. 4. — Spyros Skouras, president of Skouras Brothers Enterprises, 
Inc., is understood to have closed negotiations with Famous Players Lasky Cor- 
poration for an option on the $3,000,000 Missouri theatre and office building here. 
Skouras Brothers Enterprises has been operating the Missouri theatre for some 
time under an arrangement with Paramount whereby the profits of the Missouri 
and Ambassador theatres are divided on an equal basis. 

The move probably indicates another step of the Skouras toward the consumma- 
tion of the big merger with Wesco. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



33 



Comedy - Drama In Public Favor 



Balaban and Katz Do 
Record Holiday Business 

Over 700,000 people attended the 
Balaban and Katz theatres during the 
week of December 26- January 1. 

This fact goes to prove that if 
motion-picture theatres have some- 
thing worth while to present to the 
public, they will profit in direct pro- 
portion to the service and entertain- 
ment they are giving. 

Balaban and Katz corporation 
says: "We appreciate with profound 
gratitude Chicago's confidence and 
generous co-operation, and it will be 
our aim at all times to continue to 
merit this approval." 



Censors Turn Films 
Into Guessing Game 
For Houston Folks 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOUSTON, Jan. 4.— Censorship in South 
Texas is getting to be a great problem to 
exhibitors especially to those in Houston, 
where the censors are extreme in their moral- 
istic views. In other parts of the state, censor- 
ship is having its say, but possibly not so 
obnoxiously as in Houston. Theatres in 
Galveston, Dallas, San Antonio, and Fort 
Worth have less interference. 

The problem has attained such proportions 
in Houston that an appeal to the city com- 
mission by some theatre manager is almost 
a weekly occurence. George Woods, city 
manager and head of the board of censors, is 
the technical chief only, the board being con- 
trolled by Mrs. C. Eggert. The board has 
gone beyond supression of films, but has 
reached the point where prominent men are 
requested to submit a copy of any speech they 
intend to make in Houston for approval. A 
recent case of such action was that where 
Judge Ben Lindsay came to speak. He, how- 
ever, went over the heads of the board and 
said what he pleased. The board in a pub- 
lished statement declared that the members 
had failed to attend the speech because they 
believed it would be degrading to the morals 
of the community. 



Operator Badly Burned 

as Fire Starts in Booth 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Movitig Picture World) 

INDIANAPOLIS, Jan. 4.— James Souders, 
operator at the Idle Hour theatre, was 
severely burned about the arms and face when 
a fire started in the projection room. The 
fire damaged the room and part of the in- 
terior of the theatre. Souders was taken to 
the city hospital. The audience left the 
building in an orderly manner. 



$60 Taken by Robbers 

At Greenville, Texas 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

GREENVILLE, TEXAS, Jan. 4.— Robbers 
recently took $60 from a desk drawer of the 
Opera House here, after they were unable to 
open the safe. 



Midwest Patrons Want 
To Laugh, Survey Shows 

This Class and Straight Comedy Win Twice as Many 
Votes as All Others, Jenkins Finds 

Middlewest audiences expect their theatres to drive away the rush and worry 
of the day's tasks with laughter, tinged — but only sUghtly — with drama. That 
is what the exhibitors and their box ofBces told J. C. Jenkins, field representa- 
tive of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World. 

Direct from Exhibitors 

Knowing that there is only one infallible guide to public preference on the 
picture menu, and that is the ticket window, this publication is going direct 
to the theatre owner to determine, for the benefit of all branches of the 
industry — the maker and seller of productions just as much as the man who 
shows them in his theatre — exactly what type of picture registers most ef- 
fectively in public favor. 



It is the policy of the publication in de- 
termining patronage preference, whether it 
be regarding the picture, the star or the 
director, to go to the best possible source of 
information. That same policy of getting 
the most accurate data in the most com- 
plete form accounts for the frequency with 
which surveys are undertaken. 

It is literally a house-to-house canvass 
which "Jaysee" Jenkins is making. And 
Jenkins found, in his returns from Indiana 
and Ohio exhibitors, that the exhibitors in 
those states have learned the same thing 
as did Northwestern showmen. Comedy- 
drama comes first. 

Western Follow Comedies 

Interest in comedy-drama is double that 
in the next highest class, and that, as you 
might guess, is straight comedy. Westerns 
run a close second to straight comedy, and 
Westerns consistently show their heels to 
straight drama in the canvass. 

What may be most interesting, however, 
is the fact that comedy-dramas and com- 
edies together are twice as popular as all 
other classifications combined, and among 
the latter, in addition to the Westerns and 
straight dramas, are costume plays, his- 
torical productions, war pictures, and action 
plays. 

Here is the way the exhibitors rank them, 
in order of importance as the box office — 
infallible guide — reflects the patrons pref- 
erence: 

A. V. SEPPERT, Plaza, Dyersville, la.— Dramas, 
action plays, comedy-dramas, comedies, historical, 
Westerns, war, and costume plays. 

REES CO., Gem, Plymouth, Ind. — Comedies com- 
edy-dramas, Westerns, action plays, war, dramas, 
costume plays, and historical. 

ALBERT METZGER, Fairy, Knox, Ind.— Com- 
edy-dramas, Westerns, dramas, action plays, com- 
edies, war, historical, and costume plays. 

CLAUDE DEARDAFF, Strand, Kendallville', Ind. 
— Comedy-dramas. Westerns, action plays, dramas, 
historical, comedies, war, and costume plays. 

P. L. WERNER, Clarendon, Morocco, Ind.— 
Westerns, action plays, comedies, war comedy- 
dramas, dramas, historical, and costume plays. 



H. E. HART, Court, Auburn, Ind. — Costume 
plays, dramas, action plays, Westerns, war, comedy- 
dramas, historical, and comedies. 

JOHN WOYTINEK, Hippodrome, North Judson, 
Ind. — Comedy-dramas, action plays, dramas, com- 
edies. Westerns, war, historical, and costume plays. 

E. JENSEN, Star, Wheatfield, Ind.— Comedy- 
dramas, action plays, dramas, comedies. Westerns, 
war, historical, and costume plays. 

H. E. HOAG, Momence, Momence, 111. — Western, 
action plays, comedy-dramas, war, historical, cos- 
tume plays, and comedies. 

C. W. MELSTER, Rialto, Plymouth, Ind. — Com- 
edies, action plays, comedy-dramas. Westerns, war, 
historical, dramas, and costume plays. 

L. J. DUNNING, Strand, Warsaw, Ind.— Com 
edy-dramas. Westerns, comedies, war; action plays, 
historical, and costume plays. 

GUY LAUDERMILK, Fairy. Nappanee, Ind.— 
Action plays. Westerns, dramas, historical, war, 
comedy-dramas, and comedies. 

O. J. LAMBROTTE, Tivoli, Mishawaka, Ind.— 
Westerns, action plays, dramas, comedies, war, his- 
torical, comedy-dramas, and costume plays. 

HARRY E. LENER, Bucklen, Elkhart, Ind.— 
Comedy-dramas, Westerns, comedies, action plays, 
dramas, war, historical, and costume plays. 

HARRY E. LERNER, Lerner, Elkhart, Ind.— 
Comedies, comedy-dramas, action plays, dramas, war, 
historical, costume plays, and Westerns. 

EZRA RHODES, Castle, South Bend, Ind.— 
Westerns, action plays, comedy-dramas, comedies, 
dramas, war, historical, and costume plays. 

R. E. YOUNG, Palace, Perrysburg, Ohio. — War, 
comedy-dramas. Westerns, comedies, action plays, 
dramas, historical, and costume plays. 

W. B. HITCHCOCK, JR., Star, Upper Sandusky, 
Ohio. — Action plays. Westerns, comedy-dramas, com- 
edies, dramas, historical, war, and costume plays, 

H. C. HENRY, Valentine, Defiance, Ohio.— Com- 
edy-dramas, action plays, and comedies. 

PETER RETTIG, Mystic, Gallon, Ohio.— Com- 
edies, action plays. Westerns, comedy-dramas, war, 
historical, dramas, and costume plays. 

JAMES A. SMITH, Upper Sandusky, Ohio.— 
Comedy-dramas, action plays, dramas, comedies, war, 
historical, costume plays, and Westerns. 

OTTO J. MOTRY, Lyric, Tiffin. Ohio.— Comedy- 
dramas, Westerns, action plays, dramas, comedies, 
historical, costume plays, and war. 

H. L. TRACY, Temple, Willard, Ohio.— Comedy- 
dramas, Westerns,* war, dramas, action plays, com- 
edies, historical, and costume plays. 

JOE BROKAW, Opera House and Brokaw, 
Angola, Ind. — Comedy-dramas, dramas. Westerns, 
(Continued on page 88) 



Chicago Bandit Binds, Gags Manager; 

Escapes with $2,000 Holiday Receipts 

A lone Chicago bandit surprised Samuel Greenburg as he was counting his holi- 
day receipts early Tuesday morning at the Alcyon theatre in Highland Park, a sub- 
urb of Chicago, and forced him to reveal the combination of the safe. Greenburg 
was found five hours later, gagged and bound in the wash room of the theatre. The 
bandit had escaped with the $2,000 holiday receipts. 

After an examination, police stated they believed the bandit had secreted himself 
in the theatre during the performance. 



34 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



Columbia Expands Production and 
Sales Staff for Year 

Brandt, Back from Coast, Blames '^Terrific Waste in Executive Overhead 
and '^Conference System' " for Excessive Costs 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4. — Columbia Pictures points to the big screen names 
signed for the coming year as evidence of the fact that Columbia means 
business with a greater production and selling season for 1928-29. 



STARS signed for next season include 
Jack Holt (for five additional productions), 
Lois Wilson, Hobart Bosworth, Bert Lytell 
and Claire Windsor. In the directorial field 
the following names have been added: 
R. William Neill, Edwin Mortimer, George 
B. Seitz, Edward H. Griffith and Frank 
Capra. Several screen writers have been 
annexed for the scenario department which 
is headed by Elmer Harris. 

Huge Stage Being Added 

One result of the expanded schedule is 
the decision to add to the facilities at the 
Columbia studio in Hollywood. Work is 
now under way on a huge stage. 

Similar expansion has been undertaken in 
the sales department. Roy Alexander has 
been appointed associate salesmanager in 
the Chicago territory, as recently an- 
nounced, and John Ragland soon will ex- 
tend his West Coast branches. Three sales- 
managers from another large company are 
joining Columbia. Frederick Shoninger 
now is representing the company in all of 
Europe. 

Hits "Conference System" 

Joe Brandt, president, who has just re- 
turned with Jack Cohn from conferences 
with Harry Cohn at the studio, blames "ter- 
rific waste in executive overhead and the 
'conference system'," for much of the ex- 
cessive costs in production. 

'^Hundreds, of thousands of dollars 
have been added to payrolls in Holly- 
wood for 'unit supervisors' and produc- 
tion executives," Brandt declared, "and 
as a result pictures are costing more and 
entertainment values are growing less. 
"Here's an incident that came under my 
notice that typically illustrates my point. 

"A scenario was handed to a certain di- 
rector, with instructions to shoot. In the 
course of production one of the actors sug- 
gested a bit of business not in the script. 
The director approved of it, but he was 
blocked because of a rule that the script 
must be shot as written. The director 
thought so much of the idea, however, that 
he asked for permission to change the 
script. This necessitated a 'conference,' 
Before the 'unit supervisors' could be as- 
sembled and the change O.K.'d, a half a day 
had been lost, entailing a tremendous ex- 
pense in artists and technical help, who 
were kept waitmg for the 'conference' to 
end. 

"Columbia has no such pernicious confer- 



ence system. 

. "Columbia will not retrench. We will 
spend more money in every branch of our 
business the coming season to give the pub- 
lic the best possible form of entertainment. ' 



23 Players, 6 Assistant 
Directors Given Start by 
F B O Last Two Seasons 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YOR.K, Jan. 4.— Twenty-three young 
players and six assistant directors have been 
given their start by F B O in the last two 
years, says the home office. Among the play- 
ers cited four stars — Tom Tyler, Bob Steele, 
Buzz Barton and Red Grange, 

Ten young women given their first leads 
are : Adrienne Dore, Jola Mendez, Nora Lane, 
Gloria Lee, Sharon Lynn, Jeanne Morgan, 
Gene Stratton, Ann Sheridan, Lina Basquette 
and Alarjorie Zier. Among the men are Hugh 
Trevor, Gordon Elliott, Michael Patrick, Cum- 
mings, James Ford, Sam Nelson, Jesse De- 
Vorska, Ed. Brownell, James Pierce and 
Thomas Wells. 

Assistant directors are: Wallace Fox, Louis 
King, James Dugan, Lynn Shores, Phil Carle 
and Alfred Raboch. Robert DeLacy became a 
director with Tyler's promotion to stardom. 

Nolan to Build $100,000 
House in Canadian Capital 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

OTTAWA, Jan. 4.— P. J. Nolan, proprie- 
tor of the Rex and Columbia neighborhood 
houses in Ottawa, has announced that he will 
start the erection of a $100,000 moving pic- 
ture theatre in the high class residential sec- 
tion of the Canadian capital, operations to be 
started in the near future. The new house 
is to be known as the Avalon. 



Joseph S. Hebrew Honored 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 4.— Joseph S. He- 
brew, division manager for Warner Brothers, 
will be the guest of honor at a special dinner 
arranged by prominent exhibitors and ex- 
changemen. It will be held Friday in the 
Crystal room of the Benjamin Franklin hotel. 



Chicago Chosen as 
Meeting Place for 
Contract Committee 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4.— Chicago has been 
selected as the place for the first meeting of 
the contract committee which is to draw up a 
new standard exhibition contract. The date 
of the meeting is set for January 31. 

It has been generally expected that the meet- 
ings of these committees, one committee repre- 
senting the theatre owners and the other the 
Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of 
America, would be held in New York. The 
selection of Chicago came as' a surprise to the 
theatre owners of New York district, most of 
whom are members of the Theatre Owners 
Chamber of Commerce. At the Federal Trade 
Practice conference the T. O. C. C. refused 
membership on the theatre owners' contract 
committee in the belief that the sessions would 
be held in New York and the T. O. C. C. 
would draft recommendations. 

On learning of Chicago being designated 
as the meeting place, Sol Raives, president 
of the T. O. C. C, called a meeting of the 
board of directors and a protest was filed 
with Will Hays against holding the meet- 
ings outside New York. This protest evi- 
dently made no change in Hays' plans as it 
was stated today at his office that the plan 
for the Chicago meeting would stand. 



Dan Michalove Goes 
to Pathe; Eschmann 
Quits Eastern Post 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4.— Phil Reisman, gen- 
eral sales manager of Pathe, yesterday an- 
nounced two important changes in the per- 
sonnel of his organization. These are the 
resignation of Eddie Eschmann as Eastern 
division sales manager, and the appointment 
of Dan Michalove as Southern division man- 
ager. Both changes are effective immediately. 

Warrensburg, Mo., Yields 
to Bluenoses as Battle 
Rages in Pittsburg, Kan, 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald a>id 
Moving Picture World) 

KANSAS CITY, Jan. 4.— Warrensburg, 
Mo., has fallen a victim of the blue law 
fanatics and that town of 8,000 will have 
no Sunday motion pictures in the future. 
About one month ago Mrs. Charles Good- 
night obtained permission from the city 
council to operate her theatre on Sunday. 
Then along came the blue noses in a parade 
of protest, and the prosecuting attorney 
said he would close all shows on Sunday. 

It at first was announced that exhibitors 
would retaliate by filing complaints against 
other business houses which remained open 
on Sunday, but this week Mrs. Goodnight, 
around which the exhibition phase of the 
fight hinges, announced that she would close 
her theatre, the Star, on Sundays. 

At Pittsburg, Kas., however, exhibitors 
are continuing to obtain warrents for all 
whose businesses run on Sunday. 



6,000 "East Side" Boys See Show 

NEW YORK.— Six thousand East Side boys, 
members of the Boys' Club of New York, attended 
a special performance at the New York Hippodrome 
recently, where "Legionaires in Paris" played the 
entire week. 



Writer Warns That Blue Law Bill for 

Washington Has Good Chance to Pass 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture Jl'orld) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 4. — Warning to the people of the Capital that it is entirely 
possible for the Lankford District Blue Law bill to pass the present Congress, 
was issued last week by the Washington Daily News, a Scripps-Howard paper, 
in a signed article by Ralph D. Palmer, staff writer. The writer points to the 
fact that in the last Congress, the McLeod subcommittee favorably reported a 
Sunday closing bill. 

Dr. Joseph A. T hamper, president of the national anti-blue law society, in urging 
public action, has declared that the Sunday closing lobbyists are too strongly 
organized to be ignored. The American Equity Association has joined the fight 
on the bill. Congressman Lankford again refused to debate the issue in a letter 
to the anti-blue law society. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



35 



Showman Beats Overseating Jinx 

One Seat to Eight Persons 
Is Kansas City's Problem 



T. O. C. C. Moves to 
Offer Cooperation 
For Booking Bill 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4.— At a meeting of the 
Theatre Owners Chamber of Commerce held 
at the Hotel Astor last Thursday resolutions 
were passed expressing the body's intention 
to cooperate with exhibitors and exhibitor or- 
ganizations in an etfort to have passed the bill 
concerning the general subject of blind and 
block booking which has been introduced into 
Congress by Senator Brookhart of Iowa. 

A resolution was also made assuring Sena- 
tor Brookhart of the body's unqualified ap- 
proval and endorsement of his bill and its full 
cooperation in securing its enactment. 



Johnstown, N. Y, House 
Is Destroyed by Fire 
Loss Totals $200,000 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Ficturc World) 

JOHNSTOWN, Jan. 4.— A 1,600 seat mo- 
tion picture theatre here was burned to the 
ground on Monday afternoon with a loss 
of $200,000. The theatre was operated by 
William Smalley, head of a chain of houses 
in New York state. 

The fire was thought to have caught from 
a defective pipe in the boiler room and 
broke out just before the New Year's mati- 
nee which would have been attended by a 
record breaking crowd. The theatre was 
one of the most beautiful in the Mohawk 
valley. 



Texas M, P. T, O. Meets 
In San Antonio This Month 
To Review Trade Practices 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

SAN ANTONIO, Jan. 4.— The annual 
meeting of the Texas M. P. T. O. will be held 
in San Antonio early in January, according to 
a letter from W. S. Waid, manager, to Sidney 
Kring, publicity director of the Chamber of 
Comrnerce. This will mark the first time the 
organization has met in San Antonio, and it is 
figured that a good representation will attend, 
owing to the central location and many inter- 
esting points of San Antonio. 



9i 



Columbia's **The Warning 
Wins Blue Ribbon Award 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

DALLAS, Jan. 4.— "The Warning" Colum- 
bia's latest George B. Seitz production, has 
been given the Blue Ribbon award for Jan- 
uary by the M. P. T. O. of Dallas. This is 
the first time that an independent production 
has been the winner of this award since that 
organization started its selection of the best 
film released in its territory during the preced- 
ing month. 



Pictures Triumph Over 
Blue Laws in New Jersey 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

IRVINGTON, NEW JERSEY, Jan. 4.— 
After having been in affect for over a year, 
the city's blue laws were disregarded here 
recently, and the town now has Sunday mo- 
tion pictures. 



But Business Is Good Any Place If Exhibitors Will Make 
It So, Says Eisner — New Theatres Test Abilities 

(Is your city overseated? If so, what to do? Conditions in key centers 
throughout the United States and Canada are being revealed in detail in this 
series.) 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 

KANSAS CITY, Jan. 4. — -Kansas City is over seated, but 

Therein lies a story of "ifs" and "ands." President R. R. Biechele of the 
M. P. T. O. I<Cansas- Missouri was thumbing over some statistics. The facts 
were that there were few instances of ari "up-atid-up" exhibitor who failed to 
make a house pay. 

60,000 Seats in Kansas City 

There are approximately 60,000 seats in Kansas City, which means one seat 
for every eight persons. That that is too rnany seats for a healthy business 
condition to exist there is no doubt, but there are exhibitors in Kansas City 
today who are not operating large first run houses and who are experiencing 
good business. 



Theatres built by private capital and later 
taken over by producing companies probably 
have done more to increase the number of 
seats recently in Kansas City than anything 
else. Yet there are few instances where an 
exhibitor is really putting on good programs 
and not making money — perhaps not much, in 
several cases, but, nevertheless, he is making 
money. The winter promises to witness some 
interesting developments. 

New Theatre Hits Others' B. O. 

A condition existing at Thirty-first street 
and Troost avenue, a suburban business 
district, is a typical example of what many 
Kansas City resident districts have experi- 
enced recently. There were three theatres 
— the Isis, Apollo and Bagdad — in that sec- 
tion. Then came the opening of the new 
Rockhill theatre with its modern cooling 
system and stage facilities. Business at the 
other three threatres dropped noticeably, 
despite the fact that all four houses put on 
programs from which there was little to 
choose. 

What Will Happen Now? 

The Rockhill was new and cool, hence 
the crowds went there, although the Rock- 
hill is located at Forty-seventh and Troost. 
What will happen this winter? Will pa- 
trons living nearer to the other three thea- 
tres go a few extra blocks when a cooling 
system is not needed, provided, of course, 
that the programs at the theatre nearer 
them are up to the desired standard? That 
is a question which many Kansas City ex- 
hibitors are waiting to have answered them 
by the results at the box office these winter 
months. 

Now the new $4,000,000 Loew's Mid- 
land palace has opened downtown, seat- 
ing 4 000. What will happen to the New- 
man and Royal, Paramount houses, and 
the Liberty, a United Artists house, un- 



less they counter with something unusual 
in the ivay of programs? The Garden 
theatre, downtoivn house seating 2,000, 
also is expected to open, adding that 
many more seats to the puzzle. It looks 
as if those eight persons are going to be 
kept mighty busy in filling that one seat, 
in the opinion of veteran exhibitors. 

Kansas City long has been recognized as 
a city which will well support shows of 
merit, but ruany an "average" show has died 
an untimely death at the box office. Neigh- 
borhood exhibitors who are offering good 
pictures and a program of well balanced 
variety — not necessarily stage attractions — 
have been playing to good crowds since the 
cold weather came. A vote taken by the 
patrons of the Liberty theatre recently 
showed that they would rather have more 
Edjd better pictures at a lower admission 
than have stage attractions, less pictures 
and higher admission price, according to 
Samuel Carver, manager. If that is a cor- 
rect barometer, it apparently is not going 
to be a battle of stage presentations, but a 
battle of booking the better pictures, ex- 
hibitors believe. 

However, it cannot be denied that the 
Newman Publix stage shows have attracted 
a good percentage of the attendance at that 
theatre. Where there has been little to 
choose between pictures at various thea- 
tres, the stage shows usually have pulled 
in the business, according to box office fig- 
ures at the Newman. 

The Royal, which plays long runs on only 
the bigger pictures, time and again has 
seen box office lines on the second week's 
showing of a picture — and even the third 
week. In the opinion of Adolph Eisner, 
former president of the M. P. T. O. of 
Kansas City, business is good any place in 
the city if an exhibitor will make it so. 



DeMille Studio Will Make 43 Pictures 

For Release by Pathe in Coming Year 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 
NEW YORK, Jan. 4. — Forty-three productions from the Cecil B. DeMille 
studio will be released by Pathe next season. Eighty stories, plays and books 
had been selected as potential material and 43 were retained by decision of the 
recent West Coast conference of Elmer Pearson, John C. Flinn, Phil Reisman, 
De Mille, William Sistrom, Hector Turnbull, William De Mille and Ralph Block. 
Pearson, Flinn and Reisman are returning to the Coast soon to complete details. 

The program will include "The Godless Girl" and two other big productions, as 
well as at least two of similar caliber by James Cruze, including "The Red Mark," 
in which Nena Quartaro, new "find," is being featured. 



36 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



THIS WEEK AND NEXT 

N*Y* Motion Picture Club Seeking 
Rooms in Paramount Building 

President Coolidge Sees "King of Kings" in Picture House — Chaplin s 
"Circus^ to Make World Bow Friday — Rayart Film Applauded 
By JOHN S. SPARGO 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4. — A home in the new Paramount Building is now the 
objective of the Motion Picture Club of New York — provided suitable 
arrangements can be made with Adolph Zukor. And these suitable ar- 
rangements simply mean whether or not the 17th floor of the building can be 
secured at a rental rate within the means of the club. 



WHEN the Paramount Building was erected 
the seventeenth floor was designed for 
club purposes, and as such lends itself admira- 
bly to the needs of the Motion Picture Club. 
The real estate committee has canvassed the 
entire Times Square district and has several 
good sites offered. The most desirable of these 
is the Paramount Building location. 

At a meeting of the board of directors held 
last week a number of permanent committees 
were appointed, and one special committee. 
This latter was named for the purpose of call- 
ing on Zukor in an endeavor to secure for the 
club a home in the Paramount Building. 

An entertainment committee was appointed 
at the meeting and authorized to make plans 
for a big dinner to be held by the club at 
some date in February. This will be the first 
official function and is expected to stir up a 
lot of enthusiasm. The personnel of the com- 
mittee, which augers well for the success: of 
any entertainment, is as follows : 

William Brandt, chairman; Harry Reichenbach, 
Emil Jensen, Lou Blumenthal, S. L. Rothafel, Sime 
Silverman, Sam Dembow, Jacob Loeb, Jack Alicoate, 
Hugo Riesenfeld, and Victor M. Shapiro. 

Following are the permanent committees 
appointed at the meeting : 

MEMBERSHIP — Felix Feist, chairman; Arthur 
W. Stebbins, vice chairman; Arthur G. Whyte, Earle 
Hammons, Paul Burger, Arthur W. Kelly, Sam 
Spring, Lou Metzger, Lee Ochs, David Chatkin, and 
Walter Moore. 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS— Nathan Bur- 
kan, chairman; David Blum, and William Seligsberg. 

PUBLICITY— Paul Gulick, chairman; Jerome 
Beatty, Victor M. Shapiro, Paul Lazarus, Hovi'ard 
Dietz, John Spargo, and Herbert Cruikshank. 

REAL ESTATE— David Chatkin and Lee Ochs. 

FINANCE — Dr. A. H. Giannini, chairman; H. D. 
Buckley, vice chairman; David Bernstein, H. J. 
Yates, and J. V. Ritchey. 

In the discussion regarding dues and limit 
of membership, the following was adopted, 
based upon actual cost of a club site having 
a rental of not more than $25,000 annually : 

First 200 applications accepted $100 

Next 100 applications accepted $150 

Next 100 applications accepted $200 

Next 100 applications accepted $250 

Dues are to be $150 per year, with the first 
year's dues paid in advance as the clubroom 
doors are opened. Each succeeding year dues 
are to be paid semi-annually. 

* * * 

President Attends Screen Theatre 

What is said to be the first time a Presi- 
dent of the United States has attended a 
motion picture showing in a darkened theatre 
was the visit President and Mrs. Coolidge 
paid last week to the National theatre in 
Washington, where the "King of Kings" was 
being shown. Many of the biggest photoplays 
to tour the principal cities with their own 
orchestras within recent years have been 
shown in the East Wing of the White House. 



"Casey Jones" Wins Approval 

"Case}' Jones," the new Rayart production 
presented by W. Ray Johnston and Dwight C. 
Leeper, was accorded a hearty reception here 
at an advance showing at Wurlitzer Hall last 
week. The photoplay has been ably produced 
by Trem Carr. Charles J. Hunt directed it. 
^ * ^ 

"The Circus," Charles Chaplin's Brst film 
comedy since August, 1925, will have its 
world permiere showing at the Mark 
Strand theatre at a gala midnight perform- 
ance next Friday. In honor of Mr. Chaplin 
the performance will be attended by stage 
and screen celebrities paying tribute to the 
comedian's first picture in more than two 
years. 

* * * 

Moving pictures made under water by a 
movable cam^era, without the use of glass 
screens or other protection, will be shown at 
the Jolson theatre next Sunday evening by 
William Beebe, famous naturalist and author- 
ity on undersea life, for the benefit of the 
Stonywold Tuberculosis Sanitarium. 

The pictures were taken during Beebe's lat- 
est expedition to Gonave Bay, Haiti. The 
camera used was the motor-driven type, steel 
encased. 

* * * 

Here's New One — "Telemovies" 

Something different in the way of an ex- 
ploitation stunt was demonstrated by Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer in connection with a special 
midnight showing of "Love," starring Greta 
Garbo and John Gilbert, at the Embassy thea- 
tre. The stunt was heralded under the name 
"Telemovies," and throughout the showing of 
the picture a word picture of the action on 
the screen was broadcast. 

^ ^ ^ 

Clark and McCullough are announced by 
the Capitol theatre as the stars of the stage 
program scheduled for next week. 

^ ^ ^ 

The American Society of A'lusicians and 
Composers presented S. L. Rothafel last week 
with a heroic bronze bust of Victor Herbert, 
a replica of the one which was recently erected 
in Central Park as a Herbert Memorial. The 
presentation was made to Roxy in recognition 
of his great friendship for the beloved Amer- 
ican composer and his consistent presentation 
of the latter's compositions. 

* * * 

Bruce Johnston says Lya Mara, Defu- 
First National's star, has started work on 
"Sweetheart," her second picture for that 
company. 



Tale of Peril Told 
By Eddy on Return 
From Pathe Rescue 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4.— Clyde L. Eddy, 
vetran explorer of the Grand Canyon, who 
was called West to aid in the search for the 
party of 13 men of the Pathe-Bray expedi- 
tion making "The Bride of the Colorado," and 
who has returned to New York, brings a story 
of harrowing hardships encountered. When 
Mr. Eddy, who is said to be the only person 
to have traversed the Grand Canyon at both 
high and low water, found that the river 
unit that started from Green River, Utah, had 
arrived safely at Lees Ferry, he joined them 
and continued over 100 miles of the most 
dangerous part of the river assisting in direct- 
ing, and riding in the lead boat with the six 
that shot the dangerous rapids. 

Director Elmer Clifton, and the featured 
players, John Boles and Donald Blossom, and 
other members of the cast, went down the 
Canyon from Lees Ferry as far as Badger 
Creek Rapids, one of the worst in the river. 
So rough was the current here and so jagged 
and dangerous the protruding rocks, that it 
was necessary to "line" the boats along the 
shore with ropes and carry the provisions 
overland along the river's edge. At a point 
in these rapids, Frank Dodge, a guide, while 
wading and clinging to the bow of the boat, 
was swept under the craft by cross currents 
and luckily came up at the stern, on which he 
got a hand hold and saved himself. 



H. B. Franklin Textbook 
on Theatre Management 
Is Published by Doran 

"Motion Picture Theatre Management," 
written by Harold B. Franklin, president 
of the West Coast Theatres, Inc., is the 
title of a comprehensive volume just off the 
presses of George H. Doran Company, New 
York. Franklin, who organized the first 
Publix Theatre Managers' Training School, 
dissects the problem of operation of a the- 
atre from curb to stage and from dome to 
basement. The volume will be reviewed in 
detail in the next issue of Better The.\t.res. 

First Suburban Theatre 
Is Planned for Wichita 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

WICHITA, KAN., Jan. 4.— Wichita's first 
suburban theatre will be erected by the Hart- 
man Building Company and will cost $150,000 
and seat 1,500 persons. There will be a full 
stage. Construction is to be completed by 
spring. The George H. Siedhoff company has 
the contract. 

J. C. Hartman will be directing manager, 
the company directors being : H. J. Stockman, 
Chanute ; H. A. Hamilton, Colorado Springs ; 
Mr. Siedhoff, J. F. Dostal, Colorado Springs ; 
Charles F. Smyth, Wichita ; and Mr. Hartman. 

Joe Gerbracht Marries 
As Yule Gift to Himself 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World ) 

DES MOINES, Jan. 4.— Joe Gerbracht, 
manager of theatres at Ames, la., gave 
himself the Christmas present of a wife when 
he was united in marriage Christmas morn- 
ing to Miss Jennie Mitchell at St. Cecelia's 
Catholic church at 8 :35 o'clock mass. 

Mrs. Gerbracht has been assistant secretary 
and treasurer for the Ames Theatre company 
for the last eighteen months. Gerbracht has 
been in the theatrical business in Ames for 
seventeen years. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



37 





W 




PICTORIAL SECTIOJ 


%T Stories Told 
. ^ by the Camera 





The drab of Gloom overtake not the bright spirits 
of Fancy in this mural of United Artists' new Los 
Angeles theatre. The personalities of Fairbanks, 
Valentino, Barrymore, and others are readily 
noted. 



^^^^^^^^^^^ 





For Winter's approval, a coat of tan broadtail with 
dyed squirrel collars and cuffs. It is worn this sea- 
son (and above) by Lillian Gillmore, who is fea- 
tured in Universal Pictures. 



Hollywood has attracted more alien talent in 
Camilla Bom, who achieved fame in Europe oppo- 
site Emil Jannings in "Faust." United Artists' 
"Tempest" affords her first American role. 




Some members of Educational's Cameo Comedy Company, pos- Santa came unexpectedly to the F B O set of "The Valley of 

ing on the set for Monte Collins' special benefit — if any. Collins Superstition," causing even further surprise by bringing every- 

(at right) is a new Educational comedian, though a veteran in body just what he wanted. From left to right, Tom Tyler, the 

the craft of laugh-making. Shown with him are Lucille Hutton star; Nic Musuraca, cameraman; Harry Woods as Mr. Claus; 

and Jules White, director — besides the redskins. Barney Fuery, and Director Robert DeLacy. 



38 



EXfflBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 





Principally because he is a lead- 
ing exhibitor we are indeed happy 
to introduce C. W, Deibel of 
Youngstown, O., to his fellow- 
showmen — but also because — 



— he won this amazing array of trophies in fifteen 
years of golfing. Meanwhile, he was building and oper- 
ating four theatres! Still, here are the trophies — and 
every one his without appeal to the board of arbi- 
tration. 



Louis M. Boas, whose troubles 
never come singly. For L. M. 
has about a dozen theatres in his 
circuit in Eastern Massachusetts. 
(Photo by H. E. N.) 




Timeless the quarrel of those who would dance for us and those 
who will think for us. Then let the dancing be done by Gilda 
Gray ! It is Gilda arguing for the pleasanter cause in this scene 
taken from the United Artists production, "The Devil Dancer," 
in which she is starred. 



In such a chamber might a queen close her ears for an hour to 
intrigue. It is the music room of England's Anne which Uni- 
versal, as pictured above, has faithfully duplicated for "The 
Man Who Laughs," the Hugo classic starring Conrad Veidt, 
with Paul Leni directing. 




Josephine Boria, Italian girl who 
became temporarily Russian to 
portray Stepka in Lyof Tolstoy's 
"The Cossacks," M-G-M's latest 
starring vehicle for John Gilbert. 



It's a long lane, etc. . . . Or is it the worm that turns? 
Nevertheless, here are Dolores Del Rio, star, and 
Edwin Carewe, director, turned vice versa for the 
nonce in a bit of by-play while making United Artists' 
"Ramona.'' ■ 



Since 1899 Harry Asher of Bos- 
ton has been a New Elngland dis- 
tributor. And now his company 
is Universal's only franchise 
holder in America! 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



39 






Hal Roach conferring with his directors. "See the whip? Now, think up 
something funny!" Thus are Roach M-G-M comedies made. . . . However, 
this much IS true: From left to right, they are Fred Guiol, Bob McGowan, 
Roach, Leo McCarey, Hal Yates, James Farrott, and Claude Bruckman. 



A new contract, signed, sealed and delivered, in- 
suring more M-G-M productions from the direc- 
torial hand of Clarence Brown (left). The 
good wishes are Associate Producer Thalberg's. 




John Gilbert (left) and George Hill, star and di- Gotham's "San Francisco Nights" will bring to the screen a new star in 

rector, respectively, of "The Cossacks," M-G-M Hobart Cavanaugh, who has had the leading role in the Los Angeles cast of 

production, waiting, as it were, on the steppes "Broadway," popular stage play. The photograph shows Sam Sax, president 

for more Russian business to start. of Gotham (left), introducing Cavanaugh (center) to R. William Neill, director. 




Country boy and girl at the meadow's 
end — a scene from Paramount's 
"Doomsday," showing Florence Vidor, 
the star, and Gary Cooper. 




" ... in every port." Yet there's ONE 
for weather foul or clear. These lovers 
are George O'Brien and Lois Moran in 
Fox's "Sharp Shooters." 




Then in a garden of the rich . . . love 
may die- — a scene from First National's 
"Sailors' Wives" with Mary Astor and 
Gayne Whitman. 



40 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



THE STUDIO 



Incorporated in this department of Exhibitors Herald is the Moving Picture World department, 

"Hollyivood." 



Ten Box Office Stars Hard 

in Throes of Holiday Grind 

Burr-Hines Starts "Chinatown"; Fox Starts "Square Crooks" and 
De Mille Starts "Hold 'Em Yale"; Luther Reed 
Completing "Hell's Angeles" 
By DOUGLAS HODGES 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 3. — Ten stars of super excellence box office material 
are in the throes of picture making- today and have been during the festive week 
just passed. Production, indicatively hard pressed, has also diverted studio 
chiefs' minds from their annual habit of holiday merry making. 

The stars referred to appear herewith in a brief summary of their activities : 

Colleen Moore "Lilac Time".. F. N. 

Harold Lloyd , "Speedy" Par. 

Clara Bow Z...: "Red Hair" Par. 

Lon Chaney "Laugh Clown" MGM 

Norma Shearer ."Actress" MGM 

Ramon Novarro "China Bound" MGM 

John Gilbert _ "The Cossacks" MGM 

Estelle Taylor "Lady Raffles" Col. 

Rod La Rocque "Hold 'Em Yale" Pathe 

Dolores Del Rio "Red Dancer" Fox 

Harry Langdon's latest comedy, "The Chaser," has been completed and will 
be previewed shortly. Milton Sills is finishing work on "Burning Daylight" in 
which Mrs. Sills, Doris Kenyon, appears opposite him. 

Jack Mulhall and Dorothy Mackaill are which is under the able direction of E. H 
busy in "Lady Be Good" which Richard 
Wallace is directing for First National. 

Boyd in De Mille Opus 

William Boyd is working in "The Sky 
Scraper" which Howard Higc^in is directing 
at the De Mille lot. 

Sally O'Neil and Margaret Livingston are 
principals in the Robert Kane production, 
"The Mad Hour," being filmed at First 
National. 

The De Mille studios launched one pic- 
ture during the holidays, "Hold 'Em Yale," 



Town Honors Champion 
Moving Picture Goer 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald md 
Moving Picture World) 

CHEROKEE, I A., Jan. 4.— Mrs. 
Wilhelmina Alff, 85, who has seen 
3,000 motion pictures in as many suc- 
cessive nights, is to be honored at a 
special celebration given by the town 
as a tribute to her feat. 

In commenting on this an editorial 
in the Des Moines Evening Tribune- 
Capital says, "a generation or two 
ago there were fewer pleasures for 
men and women of Mrs. Alff's age 
and situation. On that count alone 
the moving pictures are entitled to a 
great deal." 



which is under the able direction of E. 
Griffith. 

Fox Begins Seller Film 

Fox Film Corporation began the produc- 
tion of "Square Crooks," a Lou Seller pro- 
duction with Dorothy Dwan and Robert 
Armstrong. 

"China Bound," a William Nigh picture, 
and "Laugh Clown Laugh" were begun last 
week by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 

Mines Begins "Chinatown" 

First National began work on "Chinatown 
Charley," a Burr and Hines production at 
the Tec-Art lot Dec. 29. Louise Lorraine 
was selected for the leading role opposite 
Johnny. Edna May has the second femi- 
nine lead in the picture. 

Luther Reed is completing the direction 
of "Hell's Angeles" at the Metropolitan 
studios. Ben Lyon and James Hall have 
the two big male roles in the picture and 
will return to their regular studios in a 
few days. 



Gunning Loses Suit for 
$750 Against Ralph I nee 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 4.— Ralph Ince was 
given judgment last week in Superior Court 
when he was a defendant in a suit brought by 
Wid Gunning and Sig Schlager on an alleged 
debt of $750. 



Blank Opens $400,000 
Riviera at Waterloo, la; 
Will Present Publix Units 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

DES MOINES, Jan. 4.— The opening of 
the Riviera theatre at Waterloo, la., the even- 
ing of December 29 added another house to 
the string owned by A. H. Blank and his as- 
sociates. The house has a capacity of 1,900 
and is part of a theatre and office building 
costing $400,000. The Riviera will operate on 
a picture and Publix show policy. 

In the party attending the opening were 
A. H. Blank, Harry David, and Miss Dorothy 
Day of Des Moines, and M. E. Snyder of New 
York, general manager of Publix productions. 
Herbert Grove, for several years manager of 
the Des Moines theatre in Des Moines, is 
managing the new house. 



Mrs. Mack Wins Award 
In Suit on Actor's Death 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 4.— Mrs. Charles 
Emmett McNerney, widow of Charles Emmett 
Mack, Warner Brothers featured player, was 
awarded $5,000 benefit award and funeral ex- 
penses and a decision was handed down that 
the film company was liable for the death of 
an actor on location during the lunch hour. 



Stunt Flier Dies from 

Injuries as Plane Falls 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

_ HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 4.— Al Johnson, 28, 
film stunt filer and pilot for Caddo Company 
died Friday from injuries received at Glendale 
when his plane struck high tension wires and 
crashed to the ground. 



Maria Cord a Leaves 

F.N. Lot to Free Lance 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 4.— Maria Corda, 
star of "The Private Life of Helen of Troy," 
last week severed her connections with First 
National and determined to accept offers from 
other motion picture companies. 



Betty Back to School 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 4.— Betty Bronson, 
immediately upon the termination of her con- 
tract with Paramount, enrolled in the Marion 
Morgan School for Dancing. She will resume 
studies that she discontinued at the time Para- 
mount placed her under contract in 1924. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



41 



THE STUDIO PREVIEW 



Fox Gave 7 Players Who 
Win Contracts First Roles 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picttire World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 4.— Seven of the six- 
teen players who have been given contracts 
after being placed by the Central Casting Cor- 
poration, were given their first opportunities 
by Fox. 

Marjorie Beebe of Kansas City, first had a 
role in "Very Confidential ;" Sue Carol of Chi- 
cago, in "Slaves of Beauty;" Dione Ellis of 
Los Angeles, in "Cradle Snatchers ;" Caryl 
Lincoln of Oakland, in "Wolf Fangs ;" David 
Rollins in "High School Hero ;" Gordon Elliot 
of Kansas City, in "Arizona Wildcat;" and 
Pat Cunning of Santa Clara, in "Very Con- 
fidential." 

"Truth" to be 1928 Motto, 
Declares B. P. Schulherg 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 4.— "The year 1928 
will be a year of truth in motion pictures. 
Truthful, human stories — faithfully, carefully 
and truthfully told. It will be a year of artis- 
tic accomplishment and it will leave the screen 
absolutely dominant in the entertainment 
field." This was the declaration of B. P. 
Schulberg, associate producer of Paramount, 
recently, in discussing industrial changes for 
the new year. 

"The year just closing saw the end of what 
the trade has come to call 'gag' comedies," 
also stated Schulberg. 

Charlie Chaplin to Make 
Serious Film of Napoleon 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4.— Charlie Chaplin will 
start filming his conception of Napoleon Bona- 
parte in April, 1928, as a serious production 
to be written, directed and produced by him- 
self. He is seeking a man for the role of the 
emperor. Part of the film will be made in 
France, says Carlyle Robinson, Chaplin's per- 
sonal representative. 

Synchronization Biggest 
Development, Says Warner 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NE\y YORK, Jan. 4.— "The year 1928 will 
make its greatest contribution to the motion 
picture public in the development of the Vita- 
phone and the Movietone," said H. M. War- 
ner, president of Warner Brothers, recently. 
He sails January 14, with his brother Jack, 
for a two-months' trip to Europe. 



Wolheim Out of "Angels" 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 4.— Louis Wolheim 
has been removed from the cast of "Hell's 
Angels" and has been replaced by George 
Cooper. It is the Caddo production to be re- 
leased by United Artists. 



New Picture Firm Files 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 4.— The Consolidated 
Pictures Corporation of CaHfornia, a $1,000,- 
000 San Francisco motion picture concern, has 
filed incorporation papers with the secretary 
of state at Sacramento. 



Costumers to Marry Soon 

UNIVERSAL CITY. — Johanna Mathieson, costume 
designer for Universal, will be married in the spring 
to Elmer N. Woolf. 



AL JOLSON'S opening of "The Jazz 
Singer" with Vitaphone was one 
L of the most successful showings 
of Vitaphone which have been heard on 
the Coast. In that many of the titles 
were spoken on the record the picture 
has made an advancement beyond any- 
thing previously attempted by Warner 
Brothers. 

Jolson in the black face character on 
the screen is an excellent substitute for 
his black face Mammy-singing charac- 
terization of the stage. He is well sup- 
ported by May MacAvoy whose good 
roles recently have been far too few but 
who takes excellent advantage of such 
opportunities as this. 

It is a good picture with a story every- 
one likes. 

The son of the Jewish Cantor has a 
flare to sing on the stage which his 
father duly abhors. When the child 
leaves home his mother alone claims him 
as her son and his father asks him never 
to return. 

The son's climb to fame is taken for 
granted and the homecoming situation 
later is well stressed. 

A father's grim determination, a 
sweetheart's unselfish interest, and a 
mother's love are the three main factors 
in the story and each receives good 
treatment. 

* * * 

In "The Crystal Cup" Dorothy Mac- 
kaill, a professed manhater for a decade, 
weds Rocklifife Fellowes, shoots him and 
immediately becomes attached to another 



Exhibitor Cuts Newsreel 
of Marion Parker's Slayer 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

COLUMBUS, O., Jan. 4— Because 
he believed that a current news reel 
containing shots of William E. Hick- 
man, kidnaper and slayer of Marian 
Parker in Los Angeles, placed the 
killer on a pedestal, Johnny Jones, 
manager of the Majestic theatre cen- 
sored the reels before he would per- 
mit their exhibition. "I see no rea- 
son why a murderer of the type of 
Hickman should be glorified through 
the medium of the screen," Jones 
declared. "The Majestic theatre ca- 
ters to every member of the family 
and there is no particular moral man- 
ifested in the showing of the instru- 
ments used by Hickman in his mur- 
der. International Newsreel fur- 
nished us with a fine screen story of 
the whole affair which was consid- 
erably edited, but in my estimation 
Hickman was given too much pomp. 
If the punishment of Hickman was 
shown as a result of the terrible 
crime, that would be a lesson and I 
would be only too glad to show it." 



young man, Jack Mulhall. Love, of 
course is "The Crystal Cup" and in that 
respect the picture conforms to a well 
proven motion picture formula. Miss 
Mackaill's work is excellent. 

* * * ' 

"The City Gone Wild" is James 
Cruze's last effort at Paramount and is a 
fast moving crime drama made in nine 
or 10 days with Thomas Meighan as the 
District Attorney in the showdown. 
Cruze and Meighan know plenty about 
making pictures but Hollywood people 
have decided that even they need more 
time to make good ones. 

* * * 

"Sunrise" is still playing at the Car- 
thay Circle theatre where it opened four 
weeks ago and is gathering momentum 
with each successive performance. It 
has been called a "marvelous picture," 
an "epic of the soul," an "unique 
achievement" and an "inspired film tri- 
umph." 

It is probably all of those. I liked 
it and am sending my friends to see it. 

* * * 

Lillian Rich who did a remarkable 
piece of work in a picture called "The 
Golden Web" a year ago and suddenly 
disappeared is in a picture previewed at 
the Westlake theatre a few nights ago 
called "The Web of Fate." Her work 
is as it always was and she is at a dis- 
tinct disadvantage in the picture only be- 
cause of the weak story and weaker di- 
rection. Obvious trickery in pictures is 
uncommendable, now as ever, and dual 
roles come in that class of production. 
Miss Rich is both heroine and heavy 
and one role affects the other. 

Explanations of the critical move- 
ments in the picture are lacking and 
leave the audience wondering why the 
villainess shot the villain. The audience 
wonders why the heroine doesn't have 
the man arrested who kills her father; 
wonders why she doesn't marry the man 
she loves in the second reel; and won- 
ders why the same young woman should, 
after finding a man dead, inquisitively 
handle the gun with which he has ob- 
viously killed himself. The picture was 
made by the Peerless company and has 
the virtue of being comparatively short. 

—HODGES 



Warren Doan Goes East 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 4.— Warren Doani. 
general manager of Hal Roach Studios, left 
Friday for New York to disicuss output for 
1928 with Metro-Goldyn-Mayer officials. 



42 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



Showfolk Proud of Their Pets 




After all a pet's a pet, if you like it that way. So we present (left) Samuel S. Torgan, 
who operates the Strand in Lowell, Mass.. and his bull pup; (center) Charles B. 
Craig, manager of the Strand in Gloucester, Mass., Mrs. Craig, and their daughter; 
and David H. Farrell, owner of the New Onset in Onset, Mass., and his grandson. 
Master Charlie Farrell — who is, by the way, a nephew of Charles Farrell, the popu- 
lar Fox player. 



Al Jolson in Person at Opening of 
^^Jazz Singer^^ at Criterion 

Lone Bandit Gets $1,500 at Pantages Box Office; "Death Note" Given 
Cashier — Universal Discusses Closing 
By RAY MURRAY 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 3. — Warner Brothers' second complete Vitaphone 
program attracted throngs of picture fans and film celebrities to thei 
Criterion on Wednesday night. As an added attraction Al Jolson ap- 
peared in person and related a few amusing experiences he had during the film- 
ing of "The Jazz Singer" in which he is starred. 

T OLSON arrived from New York the day Laemmle said it would be for a much shorter 



J of the opening and departed Thursday 
for New Orleans for a radio broadcasting en- 
gagement. He stated he will return in Janu- 
ary to make another picture for Warner 
Brothers. 

The combination of story and Vitaphone for 
"The Jazz Singer" was declared perfect by 
critics and fans and the vocal numbers re- 
ceived tremendous applause. An unusually 
pleasing musical score arranged by Louis 
Silvers accompanied the picture. Conrad 
Nagel acted as master of ceremonies on the 
opening night and introduced the following 
members of the cast: Eugenie Besserer, Otto 
Lederer, Warner Oland, Bobbie Gordon and 
Al Jolson. 

ifi * ❖ 

Bajidit Gets $1,500 

A lone bandit held up the Pantages theatre 
box office last Tuesday night about 10:30 and 
stole $1,500 while 50 bystanders looked on. 
Pantages, which runs pictures and vaudeville, 
is located at Seventh and Hill street, one of 
the busiest corners of Los Angeles. The 
robber slipped a note scrawled on wrapping 
paper to Marie Lowell, reading: "Don't 
scream, death to you ! Give me the money." 
The girl complied and the man scooped the 
money up and stepped into an automobile 
driven by a confederate. 



time. 



* * * 
Game Hunter 
intention of marriage 



To Wed Bii 

Notice of intention of marriage has been 
filed by George Joseph Hansen, big game 
hunter, and Blanche J. Mehaffey, 23 year old 
screen star. Miss Mehaffey was a Wampus 
star three 3'ears ago. Hausen is 48. 

* * * 

Monte Blue to South Seas 

Monte Blue, Bena Bush and Raquel Torres 
headed a party of 20 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
players who departed Tuesday night for San 
Francisco where they sailed Friday for the 
South Sea Islands. Robert Flaherty and _W. 
S. VanDyke, directors, are already on location 
filming the early scenes for "Southern Skies." 



N. Y. Exhibitors Help 
Students — and Selves 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ALBANY. Jan. 4.— Exhibitors of 
northern New York are looking weeks 
ahead these days and cashing in 
through their foresight. Each year, 
at Eastertime, hundreds of boys and 
eirls who will graduate from various 



* * * 

Universal Pictures Corporation is so far 
ahead of production schedule for 1928-29, that 
there is a possibility of that studio closing 
down for a brief period about February 1, 
according to Carl Laemmle, president. Sev- 
eral conferences have been held during the 
past 10 days at which the feasibility of closing 
the studio was discussed. No definite deci- 
sion has as yet been reached by the executives. 
According to rumors the Universal City plant 
would be closed for four months but Mr. 



high schools in New York state jour- 
ney to Washington for their vaca- 
tion. The exhibitors are cooperating 
with these students and providing the 
greater part of the money to meet the 
expense of the trips. Benefit nights 
are already the vogue at many of the 
theatres, the students assisting in 
selling tickets to their friends and 
sharing in the receipts of the even- 
ing. This extends over a period of 
several weeks. 



The companjf will not return until about June 
1928. 

^ ^ 

A "short circuit" in the ventilating system 
on stage 5 of the Paramount-Famous-Lasky 
lot started a blaze which sent the Hollywood 
fire department to the scene Tuesday. 

* * * 

Meehan Goes East 

J. Leo Meehan, F B O director, left for New 
York Thursday night via. Los Angeles 
Limited Unipn Pacific, to be away two weeks. 

Jerome Beatty, who was recently made head 
of the advertising and publicity department of 
First National, is due to arrive here about 
January 15. 

^ ^ ^ 

Theatre Man Lost 

Friends and relatives of William R. Hughes, 
who disappeared from his Santa Ana home, 
last October, are seeking him throughout the 
country. No word has been received by his 
wife or mother and they have appealed to the 
Travelers' Aid Society to assist them in the 
search. Hughes was district manager for 
George Mann Theatres, Inc., at Eureka, and 
left there several months ago entering the 
employ of West Coast Theatres, representing 
that concern in Santa Ana. The missing 
man is 34 years of age, is five feet eight and 
a half inches tall and weighs 160 pounds. He 
has dark hair and gray eyes. 

^ ^ ^ 

"Hoot" Gibson and his company departed 
Wednesday for Lake Arrowhead to get ex- 
terior scenes for his new Western, of which 
he is the author, producer and star. 

H: 4s H: 

Hughes Signs Air-Vet 

Ted Parsons, world famous air-fighter dur- 
ing the World War, has been signed by 
Howard Hughes, president of Caddo Com- 
pany, to act as technical adviser in the filming 
of the flying scenes for "Hell's Angels." 

* * * 

Billie Dove in Korda Film 

Billie Dove's next First National picture to 
follow "The Heart of a Follies Girl" will be 
"The Yellow Lily," an original by Lajos Biro, 
noted European dramatist. Alexander Korda 
will direct. Bess Meredyth is doing the adap- 
tation. 

^ ^ ^ 

Nancy Drexel has been selected to play one 
of the featured girl roles in F. W. Murnau's 
next Fox production "The 4 Devils." Win- 
field Sheehan has placed her under a long 
term contract. She has been in pictures a 
little more than a year, and has been known 
as Dorothy Kitchen. Her name was changed 
with the signing of the Fox contract. 

Gotham Plans Do Not Call 
For Increased Production 
In New Season, Says Sax 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4.— "Definite plans for 
Gotham productions are not entirely complete, 
but our future program so far does not in- 
clude a greater quantity than the dozen or so 
pictures we will make this year," declared 
Sam Sax, president of Gotham, in commenting 
upon the production outlook for the new sea- 
son. 

"It is more than possible," he continued, 
"that the sum total of pictures produced will 
not aggregate as many as in 1927, as each or- 
ganization is making a sincere effort toward 
quality rather than quantity. The new year 
will see more new stars than in several sea- 
sons past, while it will also see very few 
stage plays reaching the screen. More pic- 
tures, however, will be based on great works 
of literature." 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



43 



Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World 

Production Directory 

[Number immediately following title denotes production number] 



STORY 



DIRECTOR 



CmEF BRAND 
PLAYERS NAME 



STARTING 
DATE 



Associated Studios 



NO PRODITCTION 



California Studio 



"Trailing Back" J. P. McGowan Buddy Roosevelt Trem Carr Prod. Dsc. 24 



Chadwick Studio 



"The Miracle Frank O'Connor Betty Gompson First Division 
Girl" 



Dec. 23 



Columbia Studio 



"So This Is 
Love" (15) 

"Lady 
Raffles" (16) 



Frank Capra 



R. Wm. Neill 



Shirley Mason 
Buster Collier 
Johnny Walker 
Estelle Taylor 
Roland Drew 
Lilyan Tashman 



Perfect 30 



Perfect 30 



Dec. 2 
Dec. 24 



"Circus Rookies" 


Ed. Sedgwick 


Karl Dane 


Nov. 


29 


(349) 




Wm. K. Arthur 






"The Smart Set" 


Jack Ojnway 


Wm Haines 


Nov. 


12 


(350) 










"The Cossacks" 


G«orge Hill 


John Gilbert 


Oct. 


25 


^43) 




Renee Adoree 






"China Bound" 


Wm. Nigh 


Ramon Novarro 


Dec. 


27 


(354) 








"The Actress" 


Sidney Franklin 


Norma Shearer 


Dec. 


24 


(336) 










"Laugh, Clown 


Herbert Brenon 


Lon Chaney 


Dec. 


29 


Laugh" (352) 











DeMille Studio 



"His Country" 

(3-25) 
"Skyscraper" 

(3-24) 
"Hold 'Em 

Yale" (11) 



Wm. K. Howard Rudolph 

Schildkraut 
Howard Higgin William Boyd 

E. H. Griffith Rod LaRocque 



Dec. 5 
Nov. 28 
Dec. 27 



F B 0 Studio 



"The Trail of Wallace Fox 
Courage" (468) 



Bob Steele 



Western 



Dec. 11 



First National Studio 



"Lilac Time" George Fitz- 


Colleen Moore 








Dec. 19 


maurice 












"Little Shepherd" Al Santell 


Richard Barthel- 








Dec. 14 


of Kingdom 


mesB 










Come" 












"Burning Chas. Brabin 


Milton Sills 








Dec. 18 


Daylight" 












"Lady Be Good" Richard Wallace 


Dorothy Mackaijl 
Jack Mulhall 








Dec. 5 


"The Hcadliner" Alan Dwan 


Chester Conklin 
Alice White 
Bodil Rosing 


Robt. 


Kane 


Prod. 


Dec. 20 


"Mad Hour" Joe. C. Boyle 


Sally O'Neil 
Alice White 
Larry Kent 


Robt. 


Kane 


Prod. 


Dec. 5 



Fox Studio 



"Square Crooks" 


Lou Seller Robt. Armstrong 


Dec. 


27 


(28) 


Dorothy Dwan 






"The Escape" 


Richard Rosson Wm. Russell 


Dec. 


22 


(2) 


Virginia Valli 
1 Nancy Drexel 






"Dressed to Kill" Irving CummingsEMmund Lowe 


Dec. 


22 


(6) 


Mary Astor 






"Red Dancer of 


Raoul Walsh Dolores Del Rio 


Dec. 


21 


Moscow" (21) 


Oiarles Farrell 






"Love Hungry" 


Victor Heerman Lois Moran 


Dec. 


13 


(2) 


Lawrence Gray 







STORY 



DIRECTOR 



CHIEF BRAND 
PLAYERS NAME 



STARTING 
DATE 



Metropolitan Studio 



"The Yellow 

Cameo" 
"Speedy" 
"Hell's Angels" 



'Valley Beyond 
the Law" 



Spencer Bennett Allene Ray 



Ted Wilde 
Lutheft Reed 



Leo Maloney 



Harold Lloyd 
Ben Lyon 
Greta Nissen 
Louis Wolheim 
Leo Maloney 



Patheserial 



Paramount 
Caddo Production 



Dec. 8 

July 30 
Nov. 7 



Leo Maloney Prod. Dec. 12 



Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studio 



Paramount-Famous-Lasky Corporation 



"Red Hair" 

(686) 
"Abie's Irish 

Rose" (683) 

'Honky Tonk" 
(672) 

"Partners in 
Crime" (689) 



Clarece Badger Clara Bow 



Paramount 
Paramount 



Victor Fleming CJhas. Rogers 

Jean Hersholt 

Nancy Carroll 
Victor George Bancroft Paramount 

Schertzinger 



Frank Strayer 



Wallace Fox 
Ray Hatton 



Paramount 



Dec. 12 
Nov. 5 

Nov. 26 

Dec. 19 



Tec- Art Studio 



"Chinatown 
Charley" 



Chas. Hines Johnny Hines 



Dec. 27 



Tiffany-Stahl Studio 



NO PRODUCTION THIS WEEK. 



United Artists Studio 



"Tempest" Sam Taylor John Barrymore John Barrymore 

Production Oct. 15 



Universal Studio 



"We Americans" Edw. Sloraan 
(4681) 

"Freedom of the Geo. Melford 
Press" (4827) 



"Fallen Angels" Ed. Laemmle 
^4337) 

"The Man Who Paul Leni 
Laughs" (4535) 



All Star 

Lewis Stone 
Marceline Day 
Malcolm Mc- 
Gregor 
Pauline Stark 
Norman Kerry 
Mary Philbin 
0)nrad Veidt 



Jewel 
Jewel 



Jewel 
Jewel 



Dec. 19 
Nov. 27 



Dec. 7 
Oct. 1 



Warner Brothers 



NO PRODUCTION THIS WEEK. 



( 



It will PAY qou to 

R£Ap CVmr WORD 

of this YarietM review- 



HELEN OF TROY 

First National release and production 
featuring Maria Corda, Lewis Stone and 
Ricardo Cortez. Based and the Jolm 
Erekine novel, adapted by Carey Wilson, 
with Alexander Korda directing. Pho- 
tographers, Lee Garmes and Sid Hickox. 
At the Globe, N. Y., for three weeks 
commencing Dec. 9. Running time, 87 
mins. 

Helen .„... Maria Corda 

I 

Menelaus _ - Lewis Ston^ 

Paris „ Ricardo Corte? 

Eteoneus George Fawcett 

Adraste Alice White 

Telemachus Gordon Elliott 

Ulysses _ Tom O'Brien 

Achilles .._ Bert Sprotte 

Ajax _ Mario Carillo 



A corking release that figures 

to particularly delight what is cur- 
rently smart in picturegoers. De 
luxe house loge clientele should en- 
joy it thoroughly and others will 
signify hearty acceptance, but pot 
and pan Annie may have her 
doubts because there are no cus- 
tard pies bombarding the walls of 
Troy. 

At that there's nothing subtle 
about this original satire as 
screened. Situations, bits and titles 
are broad, and those situations, 
with the titles, make the picture. 
First National has given it a splen- 




did production, including some trick 
camera work that commands ad- 
miration 

The picture is nothing like the 
book. Robert E. Sherwood adapted 
"Road to Rome" on the Erskine 
plan and Carey Wilson, making the 
"Helen" film adaptation, evidently 
had vivid memories of the play. 
More so than the novel. So "Helen" 
on the screen is more like Sher- 
wood than Erskine, although the 
latter will collect, and rightly, inas- 
much as he's the instigator of the 
whole thing. Erskine was. on the 
stage at the opening, before the 
picture, offering what was prob- 
ably the best verbal introduction 
any New York film has ever had. 
It was funny and it was short. It 
also served to introduce Maria 
Corda in person. 

Those who saw this girl in "Moon 
of Israel" are going to be surprised. 
The difference between the German 
and American idea of makeup. Miss 
Corda looks good here and in cer- 
tain spots the camera makes her 
look great. For "Helen" she's "the 
type," and plays it nicely if a little 
blank at times. In future pictures 
this will have to be overcome. On 
performance no one touches Lewis 
Stone, even if he is still reaching 
for his coat lapel despite wearing 



V 



armor. Few will know that Cortez 
is in the picture. 

"'Helen" is all comedy, including 
the score, and the big houses can 
do no better than to use the Edou- 
arde orchestration. Satirizing an- 
cient myth in general and Helen's 
affairs particularly, the titles are 
topical, while the music is mainly 
based on the pop dance tunes. 
Wheeling the giant W9oden horse 
inside the gates of Troy is accomp- 
lished to the strains of "Horses, 
Horses, Horses," etc. The film kids 
the husband-wife complex through- 
out, the king, following the con- 
quest of Troy, making a beeline for 
Helen's dressmaker to destroy the 
shop. Meanwhile he has been try- 
ing to go fishing since 9 o'clock. 
When it looks as if Helen is about 
to take another vacation with her 
second prince, the king is con- 
vinced he's going to get in his trip, 
and that finishes the picture. 

No battles and no slow spots. 
The action is lively all the way, 
with Miss Corda in various stages 
of slight clothing 

"Helen" .... is well made, lively 
and funny. The smart set will dote 
on it, and it's broad enough not to 
be over the heads of the John Held) 
Jr., models here or abroad. 

—Sid. 



^t^yiRST NATIONAL 






f IelemOf 

'B'ROY 

bg JOHN ER/-KIHE 

[ ^/■ej-^/^/£c/^yRICHARDA.ROWLAMD 

\ ^lEwiinroME MARiA Cordis 

\ ^ RICARDO CORTEZ 

IVritten fir the Screen and Produced it/ i 

CAREY Wl LION / 

Directed bg Xm 
Jkl EXAN DE R KORDA I 




IMH.IDAY WINNfR AT1W 
GLOME, BROADWAY ROAD 



46 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



LIVE NEWS FROM COAST TO COAST 



Columbus 

COLUMBUS.—^. Maxson, motion picture 
theatre owner of Celina, Ohio, has operated 
his theatre both December 18 and December 
25 in defiance of the practice of closing on Sun- 
days. He was arrested upon the orders of the 
mayor and his case was bound over to the 
grand jury of Mercer county, which convenes 
January 5. Maxson will show that three 
other towns in Mercer county are open on 
Sundays and that this is a discrimination 
against Celina, which is the county seat. The 
other towns in the county that have Sunday 
pictures are Coldwater, Ft. Recovery and 
Rockford. . . . The Board of Trustees of the 
M. P. T. O. of Ohio will hold its first quar- 
terly meeting at Columbus, January 11, when 
the matter of endorsing the Brookhart bill, 
regulating the distribution of motion picture 
films will be considered. This bill, pending in 
the National Congress, is receiving a great 
deal of attention, not only from exhibitors, 
but also from distributors and producers. The 
Ohio Association will give it a full considera- 
tion before taking action. 

^ ^ ^ 

San Aiitonio 

SAN ANTONIO.— i?. H. Shannon of Chi- 
cago has been transferred to the San Antonio 
Paramount exchange, to replace Fred Lamed, 
who has recently been promoted to assistant 
booking manager. Larned was formerly assist- 
ant ad salesmanager, and Shannon takes over 
his duties in that department. Frank Nelson is 
now the shipping clerk of Paramount, taking 
the place of Ira Johnson. Johnson has sev- 
ered his connections with Paramount, and is 
now in Oklahoma, taking charge of the inter- 
ests of his late father, who was an oil man. 
Charles Karr, ad salesmanager of the San An- 
tonio Paramount branch, is all pepped up over 
the prospects of his team winning the Lasky 
Contest. Karr is a live-wire ad salesman, 
covering the entire valley and West Texas. 
He stands at the head of the list as a sales- 
man of road-show accessories, and in the early 
Spring plans to make a personal tour of his 
territory in order to become better acquainted 
with his exhibitors and their needs. 

^ i\fi 

Atlanta 

ATLANTA. — Negotiations which have been 
under way for several days between Arthur C. 
Bromherg and Fred F. Creswell were ended 
yesterday with the official announcement that 
Creswell has joined Arthur C. Bromberg At- 
tractions as district manager, with supervision 
over the Atlanta, Charlotte, and New Orleans 
exchanges. In predicting larger and stronger 
development of independents, Bromberg calls 
attention to the long list of major stars and 
screen favorites who have already appeared 
in numerous independently produced pictures, 
and the still longer list of those who have 
been placed under contract for forthcoming 
productions, Creswell comes under the Brom- 
berg banner at a time when the outlook for 
independents is peculiarly promising. He 
brings to his new connection a vast accumula- 
tion of practical experience in distribution, 
and an intimate knowledge of the Southern 
territory. . . . The Crescent Amusement Com- 



pany, Nashville, Tenn., of which Tony Sude- 
kunt is president, has purchased the three the- 
atres in Dyersburg, Tennessee, and four 
other theatres in nearby Western Tennessee 
towns. Negotiations which had been under 
way for some time were concluded lately, ac- 
cording to an annuncement given out when 
Sudekum returned from Dyersburg, where he, 
along with his brother, Harry Sudekum, treas- 
urer of the Crescent Amusement Company, 
general manager Dean, and district manager 
/. P. Masters, conducted the finalities. The 
Crescent company already owned the Palace 
in Dyersburg. According to present plans, one 
of the newly purchased Dyersburg houses will 
be closed, while the two others will be opera- 
ted, one— the Frances, which is the oldest the- 
atre there, will continue as a road show house. 
The four other theatres included in the pur- 
chase are located at Ridgely, Tiptonville, 
Obion and Halls. All will continue opefation. 

* * * 

Portland 

PORTLAND.— Ned Depinet, general sales- 
manager, and 6". IV. Hatch, Western sales- 
manager for First National, will arrive here 
January 10. They will also cover other key 
cities on the Pacific Coast. . . . Manager 
E. M. Ludwig of the Whiteside theatre, 
Corvallis, is happy to advise that his house 
has been practically rebuilt since the recent 
disastrous fire, reopening January 2. . . . Clyde 
Blasius is now manager for the National 
Theatre Supply Company in Portland and 
adjacent territory. He was recently with the 
company in Salt Lake, and expects to make 
the "Single Contracts" famous in his new 
field. Roy C. Peacock, with headquarters in 
Seattle, will act in a supervising capacity over 
both the Seattle and the Portland fields. . . . 
John Hamrick, owner of the Blue Mouse 
theatre, has announced plans for a complete 
renovation and enlargement of the house. 
The work will be done between shows. . . . 
William G. Ripley, one of the veteran man- 
agers of Washington, and at one time_ a 
leading citizen of Aberdeen, is now operating 
both the Colonial and Pekin theatres at Long- 
view, Wash. He reports a nice holiday 
business. . . . J. R. (Jimmy.) Beale, formerly 
with Universal, has opened Portland head- 
quarters for Tiffany-Stahl, and will cover 
Oregon and the Southern counties of Wash- 
ington. . . . Al Oxtody, of San Francisco, well 
known along the row there, is enjoying a 
10-day vacation, visiting relatives in Portland. 



Girl Converted to Pictures 
When She Sees "Ben-Hur" 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Movinii Picture IVorld) 

PITTSBURGH.— The story drifts 
in that at the Beaver theatre one day 
last week an 18-year-old girl saw her 
£rst motion picture. No reason is as- 
signed for her never having before 
seen a picture, other than that she has 
lived on a farm and her trips to the 
city were very rare. The picture was 
"Ben-Hur," and that young woman 
will be hard to please, no doubt, the 
next time she sees a Sim, after hav- 
ing seen this masterpiece. 



Albany 

ALBANY. — Some time there may come a 
change in the officials of the Motion Picture 
Machine Operators' Union in Troy. There is 
that possibility, despite the fact that Harry 
Brooks has just been elected president of the 
local for the 16th year. Al Lemay has been 
elected financial secretary for an equal num- 
ber of times. Louis Rinn was chosen as sec- 
retary at the recent election, and John Ross 
was named as treasurer. . . . T. C. Streibert, 
of New York, from the FBO home office, 
was in town last week for a conference with 
Al Guteck, local manager. . . . Sam Goldstein, 
of Springfield, Mass., in Albany for a day 
spent in booking, announced that he has just 
opened a new house in Chicopee. . . . Albany's 
Film Row heard with regret that Frank 
Learnan had decided to sever relation with the 
Farash Theatres in Schenectady. Before be- 
coming identified with the motion picture the- 
atre, Learnan was associated for several years 
with the State Treasury. . . . Employees along 
Film Row were remembered at Christmas by 
Morris Silverman, of Schenectady, with cigars 
and cigarettes for the men and candy for the 
girls. . . . Nat Levy, manager for Universal, 
has joined the "spat club," which includes 
Pent on Luiwlor, Harry Seed, Al Guteck and 
others. Levy's sole excuse was that New 
York state's winters were far more severe 
than those of Philadelphia. . . . Miss Stein- 
bock, formerly with the FBO exchange, has 
joined Pathe. Harry Gibbs, special represen- 
tative for Tiffany-Stahl, was up from New 
York during the week for a conference with 
Jack Krause, local manager. 

* * * 

Kansas City 

KANSAS CITY.— For the first time in 18 
years, Bert Rogers, editor of the Olathe 
(Kan.) "Mirror," and father of Charles 
"Buddy" Rogers, screen star, took a vacation 
two weeks ago, leaving for Los Angeles to 
visit his son over the holidays and to witness 
the West Coast premiers of "My Best Girl" 
and "Wings," in which Buddy is starred. . . . 
Members of the stage production casts at the 
Orpheum and Mainstreet theatres, first run 
motion picture and presentation houses of 
Kansas City, were guests of the Orpheum 
Circuit Christmas Eve in the annual Christ- 
mas party held at the Hotel President. . . . 
Jo'e La Rose, who came from the Fox thea- 
tre, Philadelphia, to assume charge of the 
stage productions at Loew's Midland theatre, 
also will have charge of stage productions at 
Loew's State in St. Louis. . . . The thre^. 
theatres of K. S. Duncan have been closed for 
repairing and cleaning. The theatres were 
closed during the holidays in order that the 
loss would be at a minimum. . . . The per- 
sonnel of the First National branch had a 
Christmas party all its own. Tom Byerle, 
assistant manager of the exchange, donned 
the whiskers and played the role of Santa 
Claus, distributing the presents. Lew Nathan- 
son, formerly with Warner and Universal 
exchanges, has returned to Kansas City. 
C. A. Schultz, manager of the Midwest Film 
Distributors, Inc., spent Christmas with his 

{Continued on page 86) 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



47 



THE SHORT FEATURE 



Incorporated in this department of Exhibitors Herald is the Moving Picture World department, 
"Little Pictures with the Big Punch," which has presented netvs, reviews and exploitation on 

short features and serials. 

Newsreels See Biggest Year Ahead 



Great Events 
Promise Much 
For Screens 

The year 1928 promises to be the 
greatest yet in the history of the news- 
reels, in news importance and in recog- 
nition at the theatres' box offices. The 
most interesting thing about news, as 
every newspaper man knows, is the un- 
expected. And it is to be expected that 
there will be plenty of the unexpected, 
as there was in the year that has just 
put on its last show. 

There are certain assured developments 
in the new year, however, which are bound 
to make splendid "copy" for the newsreels. 
First to come to mind is the fact that this 
is the presidential election year, with all 
that means to screen news. 

Then there is every reason to believe 
that 1928 will bring new aviation records 
at least paralleling the trans-Atlantic and 
Pacific achievements of 1927. As the 
newsreels also wrote history with their 
unmatched covering of the flights last 
summer and fall, so they are prepared 
to provide even greater service to the 
theatres next season. 

The new year promises rapid develop- 
ment of presentation of picture with sound, 
through the Fox Movietone. The use of 
Movietone was an achievement of the last 
month of the old vear. What the new year 
will bring in this field can only be sur- 
mised, but a rapid expansion of its use is 
logical. 

Even Leap Lear Is "Copy" 

The year 1928 brings the Olympic Games, 
another event of worldwide interest. There 
is newsreel copy even in the fact of a leap 
year, which is certain to be the theme of 
many a sprightly "item." 

A new development of the waning 1927 
is likely to bring far-reaching results in 
the twelvemonth just starting. That is the 
use of the newsreel between acts of stage 
productions. It will be recalled that Ashton 
Stevens, dramatic critic of the Chicago 
Herald-Examiner, suggested such use of 
newsreels to fill the awkward pauses be- 
tween acts, and Martin J. Quigley gave 
the suggestion editorial commendation. 

Applied at Fond du Lac, Wis, 

Then it was discovered that the plan 
already had been placed in successful oper- 




International Newsreel will be used at each 
program in the new United Artists thea- 
tre in Los Angeles, which opened 
December 26, as the result of a contract 
signed by J. H. Goldberg, booking man- 
ager of West Coast Theatres, with G. E. 
Rosenwald, manager of Universal's Los 
Angeles exchange. 



ation at the Garrick theatre. Fond du Lac, 
Wis., other short features also being inter- 
spersed between acts of the plays put on 
by a stock company. What will the new 
year bring forth in this direction? 

Another novel use of the newsreel was 
as a prologue to a long feature of the war. 
Manager Roy McAmis of the Princess 
theatre at Sayer, Okla., applied this ex- 
periment with results in a showing of 
"The Big Parade," having bought up old 
newsreels of actual war shots. Here, too, 
may be the origin of a new practice in 
the use of newsreels to advantage. 

Flights Fully Covered 

The long distance flights probably pro- 
vided the greatest opportunity, and all the 
newsreel producers arose to the occasion. 
All showed their mettle and the complete- 
ness and flexibility of their organization 
in covering the aviators' achievements — as 
well as the tragedies of those who did not 
succeed. Educational distributed a special 
with Kinogram's pictorial history starting 
with the ill-fated attempt of Rene Fonck. 
And as Truman H. Talley, editor of Fox 
News, stated, the covering of the flights 
added immeasurably to the prestige of the 
newsreel. Incidentally, Talley was author- 



Used Between 
Acts and As 
Prologues 

ity for the statement that 10,000,000 feet 
of negative were shot last year for news- 
reels. 

Before this series of events came the 
Mississippi flood catastrophe, and the 
newsreels here played the double role of 
speeding to the public a pictorial history 
of the ravages of the waters as well as 
spreading President Coolidge's plea for 
the gathering of relief funds. So, too, in 
the case of the New England flood later 
in the year the newsreels played their 
part, as well as in the Tunney-Dempsey 
bout. 

The year marked the beginning of the 
Paramount and M-G-M newsreels, and the 
appointment of Ray L. Hall as editor of 
Pathe News when Emanuel Cohen took 
charge of Paramount's new short feature 
department. Paramount News made its bow 
with pictures of the transatlantic fliers' 
reception at a showing of "A Night in 
Spain" in New York. A national welcome 
week ushered in the M-G-M News. 

Kinograms Signs Don Thompson 

Don Thompson was signed by Kino- 
grams to build up its service in the Orient. 
International Newsreel claimed victory in 
a 200-mile air race with films from the 
Kentucky Derby when pilots of three other 
newsreels were forced down by storms. 

News of the year brought out the fact 
that Peter D. Beckero of the City theatre 
at Highland Falls, N. Y., had used Pathe 
News consecutively for sixteen years. Edu- 
cational again won the Hugo Riesenfeld 
Medal for the best short story feature of 
the year — "The Vision." 

T. G. Randolph, International News- 
reel cameraman, was drowned with two 
others when their boat was overturned by 
the force of a blasting operation which 
they were filming. 

Fox News brought out a new camera 
car. Fox Movietone made its bow with a 
recording of the applause of the crowd 
when Charles A. Lindbergh took off for 
Paris. 

Such is the record of 1927. Twelve 
months from now, to all indications, an 
even greater record of achievement will 
have been written. It is for the theatre 
owner to recognize the part the newsreel 
is playing in making his screen an up-to- 
the-minute pictorial newspaper. 



48 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



What the Newest 
Newspictures 
Are Showing 



KINOGRAMS NO. S3S5 — Lost? Mrs. Frances Cray- 
son, who with her crew of thre* in airplane Dawn 
left for Europe^Mrs, Coolidge helps Santa on busy 
days — Live turkeys for live newsboys at Lonlsrllle, 
Ky,— Feminine voices say '*8et 'em ap in the other 
alley** at Chicago, women bowlers get ready— Reveal 
Breat gash in hull of Paoldlng — Co up 10,000 f«et 
for big tea pai^y at Richmond, Va.— Lindbergh Mes 
Mexleo*e Venice. 

KLXOCRAMS NO. S3S6 — Wilbur at scene of S-4 dis- 
aster at Provineetown, Mass.— Pan-American Con- 
gress delegates assemble at Washington — Railroads 
get safety medals— Cirl swimmers off for Bermuda^ 
Germany first to demand plane tests, at Berlin— 
Lura Lures man Into the ring; and then I, at Chi- 
cago—War's lull revives Qiinese night life at Shang- 
hai— Pamunkeys bring game as gift to CovMuor at 
Richmond. 

• • • 

M-G-M NEWS NO. 39 — Mrs. Grayson makes fourth at- 
tempt to fly across Atlantic— —Monkey adopts orphan 
guinea pig— Colossal Cofferdam nears completion at 
Cromley's Mt. Pa.— Ice jams dynamited to prevent 
flood, at Grand Rapids, Mich.— Lindbergh sees 
beauties of Mexico's Venice. 

M-C-M NEWS NO. 40 — Cavalry in thrilling "desert" 
maneuvers at Monteroy, Cal.— -Kidnapper Hickman 
photographed in cell at Pendleton, Ore.— Record 
throng sees big handicap race at Jefferson Park, New 
Orlean s 6-4 heroes honored at memorial service at 
Provineetown, Mass.— Blackbirds swarm to sheep 
"restaurant" at Willamette Valley, Ore.— World's 
skating champs train for races at Lake Placid Qub, 
N. Y. 

INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL NO. ICS — Racing dogs 
plow through heavy snow for training at Crous* 
Mountain, B. C.^-Chnreh at Albemarle, N. C, de- 
stroyed by fierce night blaze— Frances Grayson lost 
on fourth attempt to hop across Atlantle— Fair co- 
eds at Corvallis, Ore., mast know how to raise 
babies— Thousands of Gulls swarm harbor at Prov- 
ineetown, Mass., in search of food. 

• • • 

INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL NO. 106 — Athletes flash 
speed in stirring winter sports at Lake Placid, N. T. 
—'Throngs swarm around Hickman at Pendleton, 
Ore., as slayer of little girl admits fiendish deed-^ 
$12,000,000 tunnel under the Rockies Bears eom- 
pletion at James Peak, Colo.'— Happy, snappy, peppy, 
the new S step dance, illustrated how It is done' in 
New York. 

PATHE NEWS NO. 104 — Submarine S-4 rammed and 
sunk In eolllson with destroyer Paulding at Prov- 
ineetown, Mass.— Republicans prepare to stage eon- 
ventlon— ^ew type parachute Is tested by Navy at 
League Island 'Navy Yard, Philadelphia— Japanese 
youths hold kite fiying contest in Hamamatsu— Mrs. 
Evangeline Lindbergh flies from Detroit to meat 
son In Mexico. 

PATHE NEWS NO. 3, Series 1928 — Runaway balloon 
pays visit to Gay Faree— Johnson swings gun In 
Florida woods Sec. Wilbur innpeots S-4 ealvage 
work at Provineetown, Mass.— 'Along Llndy's route 
in Central America— Wellesley girl weds Chinese war 
leader— Rid* rorf board In steamer's wake at Long 
Beach, Cal. 

• e • 

FOX NEWS NO. 2S— 37 seamen trapped in submarine 
S-4 at Provlneelown, Mass.^Soathem gridiron stars 
go Wes t Christ's birthplace as it looks today— 4]ol. 
Lindbergh gets mighty reception on his arrival In 
Mexico. 

FOX NEWS NO. 26— Stirring scenes as Lindbergh's 
Mexico ovation eontlnnes— All hope abandoned (or 
erew of 40 on S-4— Army aircraft bomb bridge in 
war test at Norih Carolina. 

FOX NEWS NO. 27 — One more attempt to fly tha 
Atlantic has met disaster— How the CooUdgea spent 
Qiristmas— Destroyer drydocks after sinking S-4 on 
which 40 died— Rooster and terrier In barnyard 
bout— Lindbergh's mother flies to share his triumph 
in Mexico— —Biggest Army bombers complete wreck of 
bridge In North Carolina. 

• • • 

roX Nt:WS NO. ZB — Switzerland begins Its winter 
■ports, at St. Moritz— President receives delegates to 
Cuba^Air cadets perform over Kelly Field- British 
fighting unit choose fair leader at Aldershot— West 
defeats East in winter fooball at San Franclaeo. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS NO. 43 — Bomb $250,000 bridge 
Bt Albermarle, N. C— Mexico is Llndy's— Hope ends 
for S-4 — A real snow battle at Fort Ethan Allen, 
Burlington, Vt., for the troopers^Move Harding 
bodies at Marion, Ohio, from temporary receiving 
▼anit. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS NO. 44 — ^Byrd gives them O. K., 
after seeing dogs that will go to South Pale— Honor 
new Dntehess at Tripoli, Libia— Llndy sea Canal 
City In Mexico. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS NO. 45 — P. D. Q. with T. N. T. 
at bombing of bridge In North Carolina'— To win 
Latin good will Coolidge will leave U. S. for Cuba- 
Bury the bntchet at Warsaw, Poland^Skating season 
opens at Boston^Wlnter vacation styles shown in 
Chicago. 



Gottlieb Joined Air 
Service in War^ Now 
Flying High with 'U^ 

M ANNIE GOTTLIEB, now manager 
of Universal's St. Louis exchange, has 
had plenty of varied experience in the pic- 
ture sales business 
and in the World 
War was an aviator. 
That might seem to 
indicate he has had 
many ups and 
downs, but we're as- 
sured it's chiefly ups. 

He started out 
with the Eclectic 
Film Company of 
Minneapolis in 1914 
and stayed with this 
company until it be- 
came known as 
Pa the. Then he 
joined the E. E. Ful- 
t o n Company of 
Chicago, at that time 
Films, later identified 




M. Gottlieb 



representing Lubin 
as the V. L. S. E. 
He next organized what was known as the 
Favorite Feature Film Company, handling 
such successes as "The Dumb Girl of Por- 
tici." 

At the outbreak of the war, Gottlieb 
joined and served with the Aviation Corps. 
He returned in 1919 and handled "Hearts 
of the World" for Lesser and Midwestern 
States. 

He became a member of the sales force 
of First National for one year and next 
managed the Metro-Goldwyn office in Min- 
neapolis. Joining the F. & R. Film Com- 
pany there, he handled the Warner Broth- 
ers franchise in that city. 

His connection with Universal began as 
a member of the sales force at Kansas City 
and developed into the holding down of 
the branch managership. Recently he was 
shifted to St. Louis as manager there. 



Know G. L. Wood? 
He's 'U' Manager 
In El Paso Office 

PRACTICALLY continuous service with 
one company since 1916 is the record of 
G. L. Wood, who holds the reins for Carl 
Laemmle's selling 
organization at El 
Paso. 

It was in the ca- 
pacity of bookkeep- 
er and cashier that 
Wood joined Uni- 
versal, July 17, 1916. 
He held down these 
jobs until 1918, when 
he resigned to ac- 
cept a position as 
cashier of the All 
Star Features in 
Los Angeles. Ill 
health intervened 
and he returned to 
the El Paso ex- 
change after three months. 

Wood was office manager and booker 
there until 1920, when R. C. Mcllheran 
succeeded Manager Richardson, who was 
transferred to New Orleans. He was sales- 
man for Mcllheran until June of 1922. Mc- 
llheran was shifted to Dallas and Wood 
succeeded him as manager of the El Paso 
branch. 




C. L. Wood 



The Latest 
Short Feature 
Releases 



WEEK OF JANUARY 8 
*'Panting Papas," No. 5 Standard, F B two; *^Racmg 
Mad/* Mermaid, Educational, two ; '*Felix the C*at 
in the Smoke Screen," Felix the Cat, Edaoational, 
one; '''Recollection of a Rover,'* Howe's Hodge 
Podge, Educational, one ; **Harem Scarem,*' Snappy^ 
Universal, one; '*The Trail of the Tiger," AdTen- 
ture. Universal, two; **A C^se of Scotch,'* Special, 
Universal, two ; **Bu8ter's Big Chancs,** Stem, Univer- 
sal, two ; **Bare Fists," Western Featarette, Univer- 
sal, two. 

WEEK OF JANUARY 15 
"Wedding Slips," Cameo, Educational, one; **Cutie," 
Devore, Educational, two ; *'So This Is Sapp 
Center?". Snappy, Universal, one; ''The Vanishing 
Rider," Adventure, Universal, two ; ''Sliding Home,*'' 
2nd Collegians No. 10, Junior Jewel, Universal, two; 
"Datea for Two," Stern, Universal, two; "Riding 
Gold,*' Western Featurette, Universal, two. 

WEEK OF JANUARY 22 
"Jungle Round Up," Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, one; 
"Felix the Cat in Drag^in' the Dragon," Felix the 
Cat, Educational, one; "Wildcat Valley," Taxedo, 
Educational, two; '*Ncck 'N Neck," Snappy, Univer- 
sal, one; "The Vanishing Rider," No. 2, Adventure, 
Universal, two; "Any Old Count," Gumps No. 10, 
Special, Universal, two ; "High Flyin* George," Stem 
Bros., Universal, two; "Wolves of the Range,^* 
Western Featurette, Universal, two. 

WEEK OF JANUARY 29 

"Dog Days— —Tike Sun and the Rain,'* Outdoor Sketehos, 
Educational, one; "High Strang," Mermaid, Educa- 
tional, two ; "All Set," Cameo, Educational, one ; 
**By Correspondence," Snappy. Universal, one; "The 
Vanishing Rider," No. 3, Adventure, Universal, two; 
"Horns and Orange Blossoms," Special, Universal, 
two ; "Start Something," Stem Bros., Universal, 
two ; "The Brand of Courage," Western Featurette, 
Universal, two. 

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 5 

"The Ole Swimmin' 'Ole," Snappy, Universal, one ; 
"The Vanishing Rider," No. 4, Adventure, Universal, 
two; "The Cloud Buster," Gumps No. 11, Special 
Universal, two ; "Newlyweds' Servants," Junior Jewel, 
Universal, two ; "Sealed Orders," Western Featarette, 
Universal, two ; "Buster Steps Out," Stem Bro9., 
Universal, two. 



Fox Movietone Has 
New Entertainment 
Series on Release 

Fox Movietone Entertainments go into 
release this week as an innovation for 
theatregoers of the new year. Visible and 
audible presentation of world-known per- 
formers is introduced with the Movietone. 

Raquel Meller, internationally known 
star, renders four songs in her Movietone 
appearance. Ben Bernie and his orchestra 
offer several selections. Chic Sales' comedy 
sketch, "They Are Coming to Get Me," is 
another presentation. Anatole Friedland's 
Ritz Revue gives "On the Beach in Atlantic 
City." 

Gertrude Lawrence, J. Harold Murray 
and the Rio Rita Girls claim attention in 
three song and dance numbers. Winnie 
Lightner proffers songs, as do the Kentucky 
Jubilee Choir and Nina Tarasova. 

Movietone Entertainments of national 
and international interest also include sing- 
ing by the Vatican Choir. Mussolini's 
speech and screen appearance are also 
worthy of note. For future release there 
also will be a series of condensed screen 
versions of musical comedy successes. 



U. S. and England Hear 

Newsreels Simultaneously 

For perhaps the first time in history, a 
broadcast description of the longest news- 
reel in the world was heard in the United 
States and in Europe at the same time re- 
cently when Don Hancock, Hollywood news 
radio announcer talked over WEAF which 
was hooked up with 2L0 of London, Thurs- 
day, December 29. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



49 



You Will Be a More Successful Showman 

in 1928 

If You Equip Yourself With These Books 




BUILDING THEATRE PATRONAGE 

By 

John F. Barry and Epes W. Seurgent 

460 pages of management and exploitation facts 
that will swell your box office receipts. 

Price $5.00 




F. H. Richardson's 

Fifth Edition 

HANDBOOK OF PROJECTION 

Over 1100 pages in two volumns. No theatre can 
afford to be without it. 

Price $6.00 



li mailed add 20 cents 
At Your Dealer or Direct from 



CHALMERS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

516 Fifth Avenue, New York 



50 



EXfflBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



BETTER PROJECTION 

Projection Is Essential, and "Better Projection Pays" 



By F. H. RICHARDSON 

Bluebook School Ansivers Nos. 603 and 604 



QUESTION No. 603— What are the 
dimensions of the standard aperture of 
the professional motion picture pro- 
jector, as fixed by the Society of Mo- 
tion Picture Engineers? 

This question was answered cor- 
rectly by so many that I cannot take 
up space to print all of the names. 
There are many more than 100 of 
them. 

The answer is .6995 (87/128th) of an 
inch high by .9062 (29/32nd) of an 
inch wide. And that is that. 

QUESTION No. 60-1 — How wide 
would an object which is 1/1 6th of an 
inch wide in the film photograph be in 
an undistorted 18-foot- wide screen 
image? 

Not so many on this one by a long, 
long shot. W. C. Budge, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; C. H. Hanover, Burlington, la. ; 
"C. A.," Mason City, la., (Hello, Old 
Topper. Get back in the water and 
STAY — Ed) ; Thomas McNamara, 
Waltham, Mass. ; G. L. Doe, John Doe, 
I'm A. Doe, and "Bill" Doe, all Chi- 
cago, 111. ; George Lawrence, Sackville, 
N. B. ; Charles E. Curie, Chattanooga, 



Question No. 621 

Do you consider it good practice 
to have a spare intermittent move- 
ment on hand? Explain your an- 
swer. 



Tenn. ; A. D. Henley, Seattle, Wash. ; 
Albert Cook, Denver, Colo. ; A. T. 
Boylson, Halifax, N. S. ; Charles C. 
Colby (Hello. Thought you were dead 
—Ed.), Santa Fe, N. M. ; D. G. Hen- 
derson, Quincy, 111., and W. J. Lath- 
rop. Little Rock, Ark., made good on 
this one. 

Brother Lawrence works the prob- 
lem simply, as follows : 

An 18-foot-wide picture is 18X12= 
216 inches wide. If an aperture of 
29/32 of an inch is 216 inches wide on 
the screen, then an aperture or object 
having a width of 1/32 of an inch 
would of course be as wide in the 
screen image as 29 is contained times 
into 216, which is 7.448, and since the 
object in question is 1/16 of an inch 



wide, which is 2/32nd of an inch, the 
image of it would be equal to 7.448X 
2=14.896 inches. 

The thing may be worked out by the 
following formula, as brother Curie 
points out : 1/16" : 29/32" : : X : 216", 
which reads: as 1/16" is to 29/32", so 
is X (desired measurement) to 216". 
This, according to Curie, works out 
14 26/29th of an inch. I didn't work 
out the decimal, but inasmuch as the 
equation is correctly stated, it must be 
the same as the result arrived at by 
Lawrence. 

Still another method was stated by 
"C. A." He says: Working with in- 
formation supplied on pages 245-46, 
Vol. 1, of The Bluebook, we proceed as 
follows : An 18-foot-wide picture is 
18X12=216 inches wide. Multiply this 
by 32 and divide the result by 29 and 
we have the magnification. Multiply- 
ing this by the width of object in 
film photograph (7/16 or .0625 of an 
inch) and we have the width of the 
image, which is 14.89649, or approxi- 
mately 15 inches as the width of the 
screen image of the 1/16" wide object. 



Exhibitor Wins Second 
Sunday Closing Case 
After Losing First One 

( special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

WARSA\y, IND., Jan. 4.— A jury verdict 
here in which Frank Parish, motion pic- 
ture theatre owner at Milford, Ind., was 
found not guilty of violating the law by 
operating his picture house on Sunday is 
expected to have a salutary effect on the 
small town theatre situation in Indiana. 

Parish was tried on a similar charge dur- 
ing the September term of court and was 
found guilty and fined $10 and costs. He 
continued to operate his show on Sundays 
and new charges were filed. He was 
brought to trial on one of these subsequent 
charges. A number of prominent Milford 
citizens, some of whom are active in church 
circles there, appeared as witnesses for the 
defense. They all testified that Parish has 
a good reputation and is considered a law 
abiding citizen. 



Chicago Sets Theatre-Building Record 

With Twelve New Deluxe Houses in Year 

What is probably the greatest record ever achieved by any principal city in 
America is the record attained by Chicago in 1927 by contributing to the amuse- 
ment world twelve new deluxe picture houses. All these theatres had their pre- 
mieres last year and each one can boast of a building cost ranging from $250,000 
to $1,000,000. 

The houses which opened last year and now are running under a policy of either 
straight pictures or pictures and presentations, are Ascher's Sheridan. Schoenstadt's 
Piccadilly, Marks Brothers' Marbro, Cooney Brothers' Avalon, Lubliner & Trim's 
Belpark, Congress and State, and the following independent houses, Teatro Del 
Lago. Patio, Lawndale, and Shore. December 29 United Artists also opened its 
first theatre in Chicago. 

Not only can Chicago boast of having built more theatres in 1927 than any other 
city in America, but it can safely take its place at the top of the list as the city 
with the most beautiful and more expensive deluxe picture houses, even surpassing 
New York City in the total number of these. 



January 7, 1928 EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 51 

FOUR SIMPLEX PROJECTORS 
WILL BE INSTALLED IN THE 
PROJECTION ROOMS OF THE 
NEW FOX THEATRES 

Supervisor Johnson says: 

"The splendid and progressive enter- 
tainment policy of the Fox Theatres 
combined with the present day de- 
mand for first-class dependable pro- 
jection at all times is the reason why 

FOUR SIMPLEX PROJECTORS WILL 
BE INSTALLED IN THE FOX 
THEATRES NOW BEING BUILT IN 
BROOKLYN, ST. LOUIS, DETROIT 
AND NEWARK." 




Supervisor of Projection 
FOX THEATRES 



INTERNATIONAL PROJECTOR CORPORATION 

90 Gold Street New York, N.Y. 



52 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 192a 



PRESENTATION ACTS 



Incorporated in this department of Exhibitors Herald is the Moving Picture World Department, 

"Stage and Pit." 



Big Time 

Picture House 
Stage Shows 
Are to Last 

Presentation Means Everything on 
the Bill— The Policy Not Only 
Refers to Bandshows, But 
Also for Prologues 

With the New Year with us and the 
many problems confronting theatre 
managers one of the most important 
is the policy of stage entertainment 
in the picture theatres. Now that the 
Keith-Albee and Orpheum Circuits 
have merged into one enterprise, many 
independent Exhibitors are wondering 
whether or not presentation or the 
stagehand policy will continue or 
whether it will revert to the former 
days of straight vaudeville. 

According to a statement made by 
Mort H. Singer one of the supervising 
executives of the Orpheum Circuit 
who now operate the Diversey theatre, 
Chicago, and the Mainstreet, Kansas 
City on a stage bandshow basis, it is 
safe to state that the presentation 
policy in picture houses is here to stay, 
in fact it will last as long as the people 
at the head of it will supply the public 
with good entertainment, and good 
entertainment as a rule, means good 
talent. 

Title Covers Everything 

The bandshow policy which has been chris- 
tened with the name presentation was first 
introduced into the motion picture theatre by 
Paul Ash at McVickers theatre about three 
years ago. Since then this form of entertain- 
ment has been generally known as the Paul 
Ash Policy. 

In reality pres'entation as a name covers 
everything in a theatre in the form of stage 
or screen entertainment. To present an at- 
traction means to offer it, and in the last three 
years this word has become a trademark in 
the picture house where stage entertainment 
was one of its chief attractions. As stated 
before in these columns presentation does not 
necessarily mean a Paul Ash policy with a 
band on the stage, it may also mean a pro- 
logue for your feature film or a scrim pre- 
sentation for your organ solo. However, 

(Conlinnc(\ on page 53) 



Takes Films Sincerely 

Keith'Orpheum 
Theatres Now 




Dick Maxwell and Marjorie Lee 
Presentation Artists 



WE WELCOME YOU 

The Editor of this department is happy to 
welcome its new readers from Moving Pic- 
ture World, and wishes to state that "Presen- 
tation Acts Department" is always at the serv- 
ice of Exhibitors all over the world. This 
departnuent under the above heading was inau- 
gurated three years ago by Exhibitors Herald, 
and was a department exclusive with the 
Herald. It was the only Presentation depart- 
ment conducted by a Aim trade paper that 
devoted a comprehensive section entirely to the 
activities of picture house presentation. It is 
with further pleasure we announce to our 
readers that this department shall continue to 
serve and furnish readers of Moving Picture 
World with the same careful and helpful 
money making suggestions that it has been 
furnishing to the readers and followers of this 
department of Exhibitors Herald in the past 
three years. Anything pertaining to stage 
entertainment, the booking and staging of 
same, including costuming and scenery, and 
in fact anything of vital interest to you and 
your theatre that we may know ; be assured 
that through these columns the many years of 
practical experience of Exhibitors Herald will 
be gladly passed on to you without incurring 
any additional expense to your weekly over- 
head. Since starting this department three 
years ago we have organized a staff of capable 
advisers who fully cover each and every de- 
partment of theatre presentation, and all in- 
formation that we may possess and that may 
be of interest and benefit to you and your 
theatre will be supplied to you upon request. 
Again the Editor welcomes readers of Moving 
Picture World into the Herald family. 



Run Pictures 

Since the Pathe-Keith-Albee-Or- 
pheum Merger, Vaudeville Has 
Become an Integral Part of 
the Presentation Field 

By A. RAYMOND GALLO 

Since the Keith-Albee Circuit and 
the Orpheum Circuit merger has been 
consummated, there has been a great 
deal of talk going on whether or not 
these two organizations would still 
maintain separate booking offices in 
their respective territories. 

Inasmuch as the actual merger of 
these two enterprises has only gone 
into effect on January 1, it is rather 
difficult to say what steps may be 
taken regarding this matter. 

In an interview with ]\Iort H. Singer, an 
executive officer of the Orpheum Circuit, it 
was learned that E. F. Albee, president of the 
Keith-Albee Circuit, has been elected presi- 
dent of the new organization which is to be 
known hereafter as the Keith-Albee-Orpheum 
Circuit. Marcus Heiman, president of the 
Orpheum Circuit, has been elected executive 
vicepresident of the new corporation. 

New Corporation Formed 

Because of this combine it has been neces- 
sary to exchange shares of the stock of the 
former corporations for shares in the newer 
one. Before a complete board of directors 
can be appointed, it will be necessary for the 
stockholders of both organizations to hold a 
meeting for the purpose of transferring stock. 

When these necessary corporation transac- 
tions have taken place it will then be possible 
to learn the new executive board as well as 
other executive members who will carry on 
the future booking problems of the new cir- 
cuit. 

Although no official statement has been 
made as to who would head the booking of- 
fice of the Chicago agency, it stands to reason 
that C. S. Humphrey, for many years in 
charge of the Keith-Albee agency of the Chi- 
cago office, will in all probabilities be put in 
charge of the new Keith-Albee-Orpheum Cir- 
cuit Chicago office. 

Since the inception of the Orpheum Circuit 
on June 30, 1887, Chicago has been the general 
headquarters' for its executives. Whether or 
not the executives of the former Orpheum 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



53 



corporation will remain in Chicago depends 
entirely upon the new plans laid out in New 
York l3y the new board of directors. 

Big Change Expected 

What dispensation will be made of Sam 
Kahl, known as the booking manager for the 
Junior Orpheum time and also as a Western 
representative for the former Orpheum Cir- 
cuit, is not as yet known. 

There are over 12 bookers on the fifth floor 
of the Orpheum Circuit and about four on 
the Keith-Albee, whether or not these same 
bookers will be retained is also a question. 
Up to the time of the merger, Thomas J. 
Carmody officiated as booking manager of the 
Western Vaudeville Alanagers Association, a 
subsidiary of the Orpheum Circuit, while Sam 
Kahl was booking manager for the Junior 
Orpheum Circuit. 

The general booking for the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit was always transacted through the New 
York office, with affiliation and the coopera- 
tion of the Chicago office. The New York 
office also carried on bookings for the Inter- 
state Circuit under the direction of Charles 
Freeman. 

Agency Books 500 Theatres 

With the new merger of the Keith-Albee 
and the Orpheum Circuits interests, both own- 
ing and operating more than 150 theatres in 
the United States and Canada, it is now pos- 
sible for artists of both stage and screen to 
secure more than 100 solid weeks of bookings 
by this new consolidation. It stands to reason 
that headline acts and featured artists will be 
taken under contract as heretofore for a 
period of at least three to five years to appear 
exclusively on these circuits with at least 20 
weeks bookings in Europe through affiliated 
circuits. 

Nearly 500 vaudeville theatres in America 
and Canada will hereafter be supplied with 
Keith-Albee-Orpheum entertainment. This 
means that more than 10,000 artists will be 
employed yearly by this circuit, ranging from 
a salary of $200 to $2,500 a week for headline 
attractions. 

Another point of good interest in this new 
move to unite the activities of both circuits is 
the recent merger of the Keith-Albee vaude- 
ville circuit with the Pathe-De Mille picture 
corporation which will hereafter operate as 
the Pathe Exchange, Inc., with John J. Mur- 
dock as its president. This affiliation assures 
both the Keith-Albee and Orpheum theatres 
of first run photoplays produced under the 
personal supervision of Cecil B. De Mille, and 
other famous producers which will hereafter 
distribute under the brand of Pathe. 



Now that the two leading vaudeville circuits 
in the world have joined forces with one of 
the long established film companies, it now 
places these theatres in a class of deluxe pic- 
ture houses with a presentation policy. It is 
safe to class them as such for nearly all of 
them now run motion pictures, whether feature 
length or short subject. It also is safe to state 
that nearly every theatre in the country now 
running film of some sort, with the exception 
of legitimate and musical comedy theatres, 
can be classified as deluxe picture houses with 
a presentation policy. 

To substantiate this statement, one has only 
to investigate the Marcus Loew Circuit, the 
Pantages Circuit and the new consolidated 
Keith-Albee-Orpheum Circuit and their affili- 
ated enterprises which represent the major 
stage entertainment booking organizations of 
the world. 

Chicago Office to Continue 

Whether or not the artists will hereafter be 
expected to deal with the separate subsidiary 
organizations as heretofore, is another ques- 
tion which is unable to be answered at this 
time, but it seems logical that after many 
years of building up a trade mark such as the 
Keith and the Orpheum people have, that they 
probably will not allow their third rate houses 
to exploit stage-entertainment as Keith-Albee- 
Orpheum vaudeville but only as to the class 
of their merits which may come under the 
heading of Junior Orpheum or Association 
vaudeville. 

However, regardless of how many booking 
outlets the new firm may have the general 
booking transaction will probably be carried 
on in one office with the Chicago headquarters 
continuing with changes above stated. 



Policy Will Last 



{Continued from page 52) 

when the stagehand craze first hit Chicago, the 
entire middle west went stagehand mad, doing 
what is a very serious thing to do in the show 
business, and that is resorting to too much 
of one type of entertainment, which generally 
tires the public. 

To install a policy in your theatre is not a 
matter that requires only a few minutes of 
your time to decide, it is a matter of great 
importance for once you make the final step 
in deciding a policy and commence oiTering it 
to your audience, it then becomes standard- 



ized, and the form it is presented in can 
either educate your audience in liking or dis- 
liking the policy. 

Feature Your Films 

It is true that nowadays very few motion 
pictures are made that can draw a crowd at 
the box-office on its merits, however, it isn't 
very wise to just bury your films behind an 
expensive stageshow that will more or less 
convey the idea that your motion picture is a 
secondary item on your program and that 
your stage policy is the chief magnet at your 
box-office. Never lose sight of the fact that 
no matter how good a stageshow you present 
to your audience, it is always the feature 
photoplay or comedy subject that draws most 
of the people into your house. 

This is true beyond a shadow of a doubt 
otherwise the tremendous amount of money 
involved in the production and distribution of 
motion pictures would have not reached the 
stabilized basis that they are now operating 
under. It seems that the public of today has 
become fed up on just one class of entertain- 
ment and unless they are in the mood or in a 
financial condition to see a whole evening's 
entertainment of one type, they would much 
rather see a diversified program which today 
happens to be pictures and presentation. 

This new department in the amusement 
world carries out the ideas and entertainment 
value of both, in this manner, that a comedy 
drama or a musical comedy in addition to its 
principal players may now be presented in a 
condensed form enabling the average wage 
earning theatre attendant to receive about 
three hours of entertainment at a popular ad- 
mission price to meet his pocketbook. 

Acts Can Book Solid 

It is now possible with the recent merger of 
Publix and Loew's presentation units together 
with the affiliation of the West Coast theatres 
to offer presentation artists an entire year's 
work, of consecutive booking which proves 
for itself that the new policy having started as 
a fad has now become recognized as a national 
institution which shows a neat profit on the 
books of every deluxe picture theatre owner. 
To cantinue with this profit making you must 
give your audience a little of both as they now 
have become accustomed to this type of enter- 
tainment. 



Hares Broadcasts 

Ernest Hares, featured organist of the Pagent 
theatre, St. Louie, gives an organ recital evei-y Fri- 
day noon from station KMOX, the largest radio 
broadcasting station in that city. 



DAVID GOULD 

LUBLINER & TRINZ 
BALABAN & KATZ 

Production Dept. 
Chicago 



RAY TURNER 

Featured Organist 

CORONADO THEATRE, ROCKFORD, ILL. 

(A Great States Theatre) 
USING JIMMY SAVAGE SPECIALTIES 



BENNY and WESTERN 

And Their 

WHISK-BROOM DANCE 




Have Made 
Good in All 

PUBLIX 
THEATRES 



Direction 
Wm. Morris 
Agency 



JACK MARTIN 



Featured Organist 



NEW GARFIELD THEATRE, MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
Solo Presentations — — Photoplay Synchronizing 



BERNARD COWHAM 

Oriental Theatre Milwaukee 
Just another organist with a publicity complex 



54 



EXfflBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 




Jerome H. Remick 
&Co. 



EVERYTHING comes to 
him who orders hash — BUT 
when you order a REMICK 
slide novelty, you get 

A SLIDE NOVELTY 



Novelties now ready for 
your use are: 

HERE'S YOUR CHANCE 
TO BROADCAST 

(A community set) 

WHO KNOWS 

(Straight & Comedy) 

I TOLD THEM ALL 
ABOUT YOU 

(A real novelty) 

BLUE RIVER 

(A musical treat) 

Starting off the New Year 
with the following great 
songs. 

KEEP SWEEPING THE 
COBWEBS OFF THE 
MOON. 

COBBLESTONES. 

THE SING SONG SYCA- 
MORE TREE. 

AUF WIEDERSEHN 

(We'll meet again) 

YOU'VE GOTTA BE 
GOOD TO ME. 

RAINY DAY PAL. 

Write for the above and start 
the New Year RIGHT with a 
REMICK SONG. 



J. H. Remick & Co. 

219 W. 46th St., 
New York City. 

CLIFF HESS, Mgr. 
Special Service Dept. 



Sincere 
Best Wishes! 

Below we reproduce just a few of 
the telegrams that have poured into 
the ofEce of the Editor of this de- 
partment when word of the merger 
of Exhibitors Herald and Moving 
Picture World reached the presenta- 
tion field. These wires display and 
express the interest and whole 
hearted support of some of the most 
popular people in presentation who 
represent only a small part of the 
large family of Exhibitors Herald 
readers; who with this issue join 
forces with the readers of Moving 
Picture World. Through this de- 
partment we wish to extend our sin- 
cere thanks and appreciation for the 
wonderful tributes and interest 
shown by the senders. 

EXHIBITORS HERALD 

AND MOVING PICTURE WORLD 

Having just learned of the merger of the 
two greatest trade papers in our industry we 
extend to you congratulations and the confi- 
dence that together you will give to the 
exhibitors the greatest trade paper during 
1928 that the industry has ever seen. I wish 
you personal greetings for the new year and 
hope that in the merger it will give added 
breadth and scope to your department on 
presentations, for this particular section is of 
untold value to the theatre operator today. 

JACK KNIGHT, 
Supervisor of Theatre Management, Balaban 

and Katz Corp. 

EXHIBITORS HERALD 

AND MOVING PICTURE WORLD 

Just read with keen interest the announce- 
ment of the amalgamation of the Exhibitors 
Herald and Moving Picture World. As a 
reader of the Exhibitors Herald since its in- 
ception and a devoted follower of the presenta- 
tion column, accept my congratulations and 
sincere best wishes for a continuation of your 
success. 

H. LUSTGARTEN, 
Manager, Lubliner and Trinz Harding theatre. 

* * * 

EXHIBITORS HERALD 

AND MOVING PICTURE WORLD 

I know that the great service your depart- 
ment has rendered will now through this new 
merger create a leverage of still greater pos- 
sibilities and I congratulate you and extend 
my best wishes because you deserve it by all 
the rules of merit. 

ALBERT F. BROWN, 
Featured organist, Marks Bros. Chicago the- 
atres. 

EXHIBITORS HERALD 

AND MOVING PICTURE WORLD 

Let rae extend my felicitations upon your 
consolidation with another wonderful period- 
ical, the Moving Picture World. Together you 
now stand alone in your line of endeavors. 
Again accept my congratulations. 

AL BELASCO, 
Band leader for Lubliner and Trinz Senate 

and Harding theatres, Chicago. 



Presentation 

LETTERS 



In 





L CARLOS 
MEIER 

Featured 
Organist 

Ascher's 
TERMINAL 

Theatre 
CHICAGO 

Past Nine Monlhs 



this open forum those interested in 
presentation may discuss important matters 
bearing upon this phase of theatre entertain- 
ment. Only signed letters will be published. 



PRESENTATION ACTS— To the Editor: I would 
like for you to send me more information on your 
"year's advertising campaign." For instance, could 
one take a sort of semi-monthly policy, say evei-y other 
issue for approximately one-half the amount of the 
year's campaign? And if so, what are the terms? 
I v/ould like to take up a year's campaign of adver- 
tising in the HERALD but I do not feel that I can 
afford the price at the present time. 

It may interest you to know that the Jefferson had 
a midnight show New Year's Eve, with an entire 
change of program. I opened the show with a special 
set of slides called "Astronomy" featuring "My Blue 
Heaven." Miss Winnifred Stroud assisted in this 
number, singing "My Blue Heaven" in a blue spot, 
after which she made an exit and I continued with 
the number, when the audience stai-ted to sing on this 
number they did such a thorough job of it that I 
couldn't hear the organ. Next Peg Ulrey did her in- 
terpretation of Sophie Tucker singing "Someday 
Sweetheart," she received a big hand, as this is a 
return engagement for her, and she is well liked 
here. Happy Busch and Ethel Joy followed in a 
musical novelty and didn't receive quite such a good 
hand. The chorus followed with a good number, 
"Is She My Girl Friend," in which they did some 
mighty good stepping. After which I pulled the old 
gag of some one singing in the organ chamber, but 
this was new here and the audience liked it. Next 
Peg Ulrey and Bob Bonebrake sang a duet, "High- 
ways are Happy Ways," and were well received. 
Happy Busch and Ethel Joy came back and were 
received passably well. After which Bob Bonebrake 
and the chorus did a number, "Blue Baby," with 
everyone out for the finale. The whole program 
was good and was well liked, it finishing exactly at 
twelve o'clock and was followed by a feature picture, 
"A Hero for a Night," and plenty of noise. Very 
truly yours, Jake Hammond, Solo Organist, Jefferson 
theatre, Huntington, Ind. 

PRESENTATION ACTS— To the Editor: It wish 
that you would run down to Joliet some afternoon 
and see this marvelous theatre. We could frame up 
a very interesting news item about same, as it is 
so very unusual to have such a house in such a small 
city. I am sure that the visit and your time spent 
would be amply repaid. You can get a 1 p. m. Rock 
Island train leaving La Salle St. Station and get to 
Joliet by 2 :30 p. m. and return to Chicago on the 
4:05 p. m. train. 

If you feel that you can run down we can arrange 
about my stunt at that time, otherwise let me know- 
when I can see you in your office. I usually drive 
in to Chicago on Tuesday and Friday mornings. 
We would therefore have to make an appointment. 
Best wishes and good luck for the New Year, Leo 
Terry, Organist Soloist, Rialto theatre, Joliet, III. 

PRESENTATION ACTS — To the Editor: I will 
be in Chicago in about ten days, so please let this 
matter ride and when I arrive I will look you up 
and give you what I want. We are rushed to death 
down here. 

With very best wishes and hoping that you are now 
entirely well, I am Very truly, Al Short, Howard 
theatre, Atlanta, Ga, 

PRESENTATION ACTS— To the Editor: Thanks 
for your Christmas card ; and allow me to extend 
you the best greetings of the season in return. 
Sincerely yours, Chamberlin and Himes, "Ziegfeld 
Follies," New York, N. Y. 

PRESENTATION ACTS — To the Editor: Sorry I 
was away when you came in. Let the matter rest 
until the next time I get to Chicago and will work 
out a little advertising campaign. VeiT truly yours, 
Abe Lastfogel, William Morris Agency, New York 
City. 



Local Choir Used On 
Christmas Program 

Bob Blair, manager of the Texas theatre, San 
Antonio, decided to give his patrons an additional 
entertainment feature during Christmas week. He 
obtained permission from the largest Catholic school 
in San Antonio to use their boys' choir gratis four 
times a day for the whole week and built a special 
overture production around this attraction. Blair 
also used a local singer, violinist and harpist. The 
entire production was worked in connection with an 
overture called "Christmas Carols," directed by Ern- 
est Hauser. The set consisted of a huge lighted 
cathedral window, two ten-foot candlesticks, a scrim 
and two curtains. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 




LOS4YS STAGE SHOWS 



about 
Everyone 



WELCOME, BOYS! 
Greetings and best wishes for the New Year ! — I 
wish to extend personal greetings and welcome to 
readers of Moving Picture World, who with this 
issue become a part of the large family of readers 
of Exhibitors Herald. . . . This little column written 
now and then (mostly then) appears in this section 
each week, that is, it should appear each, but some- 
times I get lazy. . . . You know we all do at times. 
. . . Well, anyhow, the point is this : Any time you 
have something of news interest that you would like 
for me to print, shoot it along in the mail ... I 
love to open lettere if they are not ones with bills 
in them. . . . Well, now that we have talked about 
the merger of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World, let us go on with the news. ... Oh say ! 
while on the subject of merger, let us say a word 
about the recent Pathe-DeMille-Keith-Albee-Orpheum 
— oh gee! I had to take three separate breaths to 
say that. . . . Both circuits will soon operate their 
booking office under one head. . . . They also will 
run Pathc films. . . . West Coast Theatres have 
taken over Saxe and the Finklestein & Ruben houses, 
and begin operating them this week. . . . With Publix 
and Loew uniting their stage units over their cir- 
cuit, presentation artists can now work more than 
a whole year without a break. . . . "Tink" Hum- 
phrey, the genial general manager of Keith-Albee's 
Chicago office, just returned from a holiday vacation. 
. . . The new Shore theatre that opened in Chicago 
last week had our friend, Cornelius Matfie, as its 
guest organist for the opening program. . . . Speak- 
ing of openings, on January 5 the Butterfield 
Circuit opens a new house in Ann Arbor, Michigan, 
called the Michigan. . . . Starting on January 10 
the Chicago club rooms of the N. V. A. resumes 
"Movie Night" and "Clown Night," two special 
frolics for the artists and members of the theatrical 
profession. . . . Florence Brady, a presentation artist, 
is now suing her husband for divorce, so is Marion 
Harris, a record artist. . . . Both claim no "atten- 
tion." . . . What is a husband good for if he can't 
"attend" to his own wife? . . . We hear that Clark 
& McCuUough are now playing de luxe picture houses. 
. . . We knew it, sooner or later they fall for it. . . . 
Or it falls for them. . . . Nearly every picture house 
in Chicago had a "midnight show" on Christmas and 
New Year's Eve. . . . Most of them had "kid shows" 
for a stage program. . . . Listen, Exhibitors! Here's 
a good stunt. . . . On some special holiday night 
turn your orchestra loose in the lobby and let your 
audience dance for a while. . . . The Granada of 
Chicago did this on New Year's Eve. . . . Mark 
Fisher was given a gi-eat welcome reception at the 
Senate theatre, Chicago, last Monday. ... He cele- 
brated it with five shows that day. . . . Another 
good man has gone wrong. . . . Jimmy Savage, well 
known in Chicago for his organ solo writing, has 
gone and got himself engaged to Olive Hope. . . . 
She is Mort Infield's secretary. . . . Have you folks 
ever met Glenn Burt? . . . He's the fellow who 
books presentation houses on the Keith- Albee circuit 
out of the Chicago office. . . . While speaking of 
agents and brokere, let us say a word about Tommy 
Burchill, the good natured booker of the W. V. M. A. 
Coast time. . . . Well, he's a heck of a fine guy, 
that's all. . . . Our good friend Jesse Crawford re- 
turns to Chicago next week for a long stay at his 
former stand. . . . Saw Jack Benny last week at 
the Chicago Palace and feel that he should do a 
master of ceremonies in picture houses. . . . Think 
it over, Jack. . . . Just got a wire from Bernard 
Cowham, organist of the Oriental theatre in Mil- 
waukee ; it said — oh well, look up his ad in this 
issue and read it. . . . Ray Turner is another organist 
that sends telegrams, only Ray wires money with 
them. . . . That's cooperation for you. ... I hope 
Cliff Hess reads this column this week for I made 
a promise that I forgot to keep. . . . Anyhow, that 
dog novelty is a great stunt, ClifE, and I'll tell the 
world about it. . . . Well, I might as well say 
something about Lester Santly, he's a friend also 
and _ might feel slighted. . . . That press book and 
music was fine. Keep your eyes on the next 
issue of "Better Theatres," Lester. . . . Gee, whiz! 
why did I start this! . . . Now I've got to mention 
Larry Spier's "Up and Down the the Alley"— ever 
read it? „ ..-i 

Presentily yours. 



Chicago Chicago 

Week Ending January 1 

The holiday show at the Chicago should be called 
"Infant Week." Never has this reporter seen so 
many infants, displaying such good talent, on any 
one stage in one show. The youngest was not a day 
older than three years, I'm afraid, and the rest ranged 
in ages from this baby on up, and every one of them 
worked like old timers. Where the Chicago got this 
array of wonderful infants and youngsters, I don't 
know. However, they had them and each was a 
wow. 

The main presentation was called "Cinderella," 
and the entire show was built around this sort of 
pageant, with Buffano acting as master of cere- 
monies and his band furnishing the music. The 
scene where Cinderella arrives in a stately carriage 
drawn by four Shetland ponies and followed by a 
procession of court folk was impressive and beauti- 
ful. The rest of the show, with the exclusion of 
the Mason dancere, and Joe Mendes, the man monkey, 
was composed entirely of the aforementioned chil- 
dren, who danced, sang and did all the other stunts 
usually put on by grownups. Every act was well 
applauded by the audience. 

The man monkey was good if you like such acts, 
in fact he was about the best trained monkey seen 
by this reporter, if that means anything. The 
Mason dancers contributed two finely executed dance 
routines, but after all, the credit goes to the infants. 
They were the whole show. 

Spitalny and his pit orchestra rendered a fine 
symphonic arrangement of popular and operatic se- 
lections. This received a fine hand. Having seen 
the last afternoon show, the always looked for and 
appreciated organ presentation of Murtagh was 
missed. 



I You cadt9o wiron^j 
With any FEIST sor ' 



St. Louis State 

Week Ending December 30 

Teddy Joyce made his bow as master of ceremonies 
for the stage shows this week. He fairly exuded 
boyish enthusiasm but seemed to be feeling his way, 
probably endeavoring to learn his audience. 

He is slim, skinny in fact, and emphasized his 
thinness by wearing a short coat and tight fitting 
trousers, while he wore a funny looking little hat at 
times. 

He is slim, lean in fact, and emphasized his 
and danced. His skating bit was the feature of 
the show. 

The Twelve Criss Cross girls also did very nicely 
under Teddy's direction. In his "Roseland" novelty 
he introduced three precocious youngsters and in the 
finale there were two French dolls in the persons of 
two tiny girls. 



Pittsburgh Grand 

Week Ending December 31 

The sole stage offering this week was Los More- 
nos and Company offering Spanish songs and dances. 
This act is ideal with a picture having a Spanish 
background but out of place with a feature like "Her 
Wild Oat" and Colleen Moore. Nicely done though. 

Overture was a medley of Yuletide songs, including 
the always popular "Silent Night," and "Pilgrim 
Chorus from Tannhauser." At finish of overture 
screen opens with a "Happy New Year" trailer 
on it. 

A comedy "Young Hollywood" and Paramount 
News was also on the bill. 

(Co'nti.nued on fogc 56) 




ED MEIKEL'S 

ORGAN CLUB 

Conducted Each Week at the 
HARDING THEATRE, CHICAGO 





THE "FEIST" SLIDE RENTAL 
SYSTEM IS AN INEXPENSIVE 
ATTRACTION FOR YOUR 
THEATRE 

Large presentations comprising 
modern art illustrated slides — 
clever- audience-proof material 
— complete cue-sheets with mu- 
sic — ready for your immediate 
showing — all for the small 
rental of 

($4.00) four dollars ($4.00) 
THE 

FOLLOWING PRESENTATIONS 
ARE NOW READY: 

"ASTRONOMY" 

(28 slides — running time 6^2 
minutes) 

A splendid slide stunt based on our 
nation-wide hit entitled 

"MY BLUE HEAVEN" 

"REQUESTS" 

(36 slides — running time 9 
minutes) 

A rousing community sing-fest that 
can't miss in any theatre compris- 
ing six "Feist" hits with gales of 
laughs mixed in between. The 
youngsters will enjoy this one. 

"BABY YOUR MOTHER" 

(24 slides — running time 7 
minutes) 

A presentation with a universal ap- 
peal; a great song and a great story 
beautifully illustrated. This will 
make a hit with the older folks. 
Send in your check or money order 
for either or all of the above pre- 
sentations at the rate of four dollars 
each. Cue sheets and music gratis. 
Slides may be used one, two, three 
days, or a week, but must be re- 
turned after programing. 



Please send a set of 

"Astronomy" 

"Requests" " 

"Baby Your Mother" 

Theatre ^ 

Address IS 

City _ 

Address all communications for rental slides 
to Dept. II. S (Ask for complete list of pres- 
entations.) 



uo. reisT IN. 

p~--, -^FEIST BLDO.-—^ 1 

231-5 W. AO^ ST,\ 

> — NE-iv YORK cj«rr— 



56 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE 



WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



STAGE SHOWS 



(Continued from page 55) 

Chicago Oriental 

Week Ending January 1 

After being away for almost two months on a vaca- 
tion to Europe, Paul Ash returned to the Oriental 
this week to resume his leadership of Chicagro's most 
well-known stagehand. The program was a varied 
one and went over big. 

Opening: Paul Small stepped in front of the cur- 
tains to sing "Greetings" to the music of "Ain't 
That a Grand and Glorious Feeling." When the 
curtains parted two large hands descended from 
above, while the ballet did a snappy dance, at the 
same time that a moving picture of Paul Ash was 
thrown on a painted likeness of himself on the 
backdrop. 

Paul appeared then in person and in a very short 
talk told how glad he was to return, hoped that the 
talent and ideas that he was able to bring back 
from abroad would please everyone and after wish- 
ing all a Happy New Year announced the first band 
number, "The Stampede." 

Ilomay Bailey then came on and sang "Dream 
Kisses," "My Blue Heaven" and "Love and Kiss 
From Your Baby to Mine." She interpreted these 
numbers in a novel and very beautiful manner, and 
of course was called for encores. 

A French trio of interpretative dancers, with Mme. 
Gesha, was next. It took the audience a minute or 
two to warm up to their work. This act was one 
of the most finished of its kind this reporter has 
seen, and they left amid loud applause. 

The band next played a concert arrangement of 
"Just a Memory." This was received with a big 
hand. 

Markell and Faun then did a boob dance to "Gor- 
geous" that provided much birth for the audience. 
This act is one of the standard picture house offer- 
ings that always clicks. It has been reported many 
times before in these columns. 

For the finale, Paul Small sang "Happy New Year" 
as the ballet appeared from a large Grandfather's 
clock above and at the rear of the stage, while the 
words "Happy New Year" were spelled out in elec- 
tric lights on the steps where the girls stood. 



Kansas City Midland 

Week Ending December 30 

Jack Sidney was programmed as "the boy of 
Kansas City" in this week's stage attraction at 
Loew's Midland, as master of ceremonies at the 
Midland, Sidney has become virtually a permanent 
part of the show. 

A medley selection was arranged by Conductor 
Carbonara of the Midland Concert Orchestra as an 
overture. Arthur Hays offered an organ novelty 
illustrated by slides, as well as organ solos during 
the feature picture. 

Benny Rabin was seen in vocal and dance num- 
bers, as was Monoff and Gifford. Kriss Kringle's 
Kiddies, thirty-five talented youngsters, were seen 
in song and dances frequently throughout the 
program. 



St. Louis Ambassador 

Week Ending December 30 

One of the most elaborate shows for the Christmas 
holidays was offered here this week. 

Lowry personally sang "Beautiful," while Ginger 
Rogers in her little-girl way sang a couple of num- 
bers about unlittle-girl subjects. 

Irmanette, a violinist who steps a bit, was also 
prominent on the bill. 

The overture was conducted by Dave Silverman. 
It was "The Toy Shop." It was accompanied by 
colored lantern slides about Santa Glaus. 



Minneapolis State 

Week Ending December 31 

Finkelstein and Ruben brought back its semi- 
annual Kiddie Revue to the State, which always is 
a favorite for holiday week, as the c:hief attraction 
on this week's bill. 

The revue was not quite up to the standard of the 
Kiddie shows of the last two years, due largely to 
the recruiting of an almost entirely new cast of 
juvenile entertainers. Several of the talented young- 
sters who have been a feature of the revues in the 
past had graduated from the Kiddie class. 

The show was played before a very novel set in 




TED LEARY 

"The Versatile Master of Ceremonies" 

SECOND SUCCESSFUL SEASON 

STRATFORD THEATRE, CHICAGO 

A National Playhouse 



"The Flying Organist" 

DON ISHAM 

FEATURED AT 

MARKS BROS. EMBASSY THEATRE, CHICAGO 

Formerly with JE\SEy Von HERBERC, JOHN HiMRICK and Other West Coast Circuits 



FLORENCE BRADY— 

"NOTHING BUT SONGS" 

Featured in the "MIDNIGHT REVUE," at the CAPITOL THEATRE, 
NEW YORK, This Week. 



RAMON BERRY 

Featured Organist 
ALAMO THEATRE, CHICAGO 

Photoplay and Solos a Specialty 



which giant musical instruments had been built to 
form houses and trees while a long, sloping runway 
backstage resembled a huge piano keyboard. 

The State band was on the stage in carnival dress, 
with its director Fred Heiseke serving in the double 
role of leader and master of ceremonies. 

The show itself was built along the mature revue 
lines, the boy entertainers being clad in miniature 
tuxedoes and the little girls simulating the roles of 
professional entertainers. Several of the youngsters 
were exceptionally good and bid fair to reap some 
of the laurels won by their predecessors. 



Atlanta Howard 

Week Ending December 31 

The Howard's presentation this week proved to be 
a merry jubilee in keeping with the gay holiday 
season. 

Al Short and his Melody Boys gave "Hello 1928," 

devised and staged by the band master and assisted 
by Virginia Semon, local dancing instructress. 

Besides a cast of professional performers, chosen 
by Short, there were also a group of Atlanta girls 
trained by Miss Semon who participated. 

Accent and Janesta, billed "Whirlwind Dancing 
Marvels," brought a good h^nd with their varied 
numbers. Bert and Eleanor Coll offered singing, 
dancing and instrumental skits and received audible 
praise. 

Billy "Uke" Carpenter, musical comedian, and 
KamberofE, tumbling accordionist, gathered their 
share of favor, also. 

Especially beautiful was "The Human Fan," done 
by a chorus of well trained diminutive girls. 

Another act of individuality was "Ladies of the 
Evening," a spectacular, scenic production given with 
special music and effects. It drew well. 



Des Moines Capitol 

Week Ending December 30 

One week it is a surprise solo number and another 
week it is a soft shoe dance that Paul Spor, master 
of ceremonies at the Capitol, uses to wedge himself 
a bit closer into the regard of his audiences. The 
little exhibition of footwork this week was a slick 
method of fastening attention where it belonged and, 
incidentally, it added to the show. 

"Dixieland," with its cargo of songs, dances and 
music from the stagehand, was celcomed generously. 
A male quartet made harmonies to start the act 
going, and there were solos by Edith Griffith, per- 
sonality girl, as a necessary foil. 

Louella Lee presented novelty dances, with Morris 
and Rapp cutting deeply into the favor of audiences 
with their original dances. Then there was Henry 
Lamont and the Gould Dancers, including eight girls, 
who added to the joys of the week. 

Joe Penner had the spot for really more time than 
anyone else on the bill. His highly original per- 
formance, comedy of a different type, if a reporter 
may use such a bromidic phrase, brought him num- 
erous encores. He sang a ditty about whispers which 
seemed to entertain especially well, a group which 
evidently understood all the sides and all the rest 
of the lingo. A few of us failed to get all the 
alleged comedy. 

Hen-bert Lee Koch at the organ was ready, as usual, 
with a Christmas medley to please his devoted fol- 
lowers. 

A colored film. "Fantasy," the news pictures, and 
"Serenade" completed a good bill. 



Francis Kromar 

de guy wot 
pounds de 
ivories and 
paddles d e 
pedals down 
by de Or- 
pheum Cir- 
cuit's Diver- 
sey Theatre, 
Chicago. 




UNIFORMS 



FOR HOUSE 
ATTACHES 



COSTUMES 



FOR STAGE 
PRESENTATIONS 



BROOKS 



1437 B'way 
N. Y. City 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



57 



Chicago Norshore 

Week Ending December 31 

B. & K. gave everyone a treat in Al Kvale's 
Christmas fantasy, which was called "Toy Town 
Follies." 

Opening: The entire cast and chorus excepting 
Al and his boys consisted of little children, none 
exceeding over 12 years of age. The show opened 
S.S Al, in neat appearing toy soldier coetume, enters 
from one side as a little girl enters and looks over 
the snow-covered gingerbread houses, which is the 
street drop. The little girl sings a popular number, 
then Al tells her a little Christmas story. 

Curtain then raises to a pretty setting of ginger- 
bread man dolls and so forth. The orchestra boys 
in toy soldier costumes play a waltz as eleven little 
girls of Miss Abbott's Dancing School offer a cute 
toy doll routine. 

Orchestra next plays Mark Fisher's song, "Every- 
-where You Go," as a little girl does a very good toe 
routine to a good hand. Al then announces a little 
Eaiit Indian doll — Little Gertie Stewart, a colored 
tot, the hit of the show, who sang "What'll You 
Do." Then did a clever jazz routine which earned 
her an encore of a well-done Black Bottom that won 
her a very fine hand. 

Little Mary and George, two bowery dolls, next 
offer a series of good acrobatic stunts to a very fine 
I'eception, Davline, a sweet little girl, next sings 
"Miss Annabelle Lee" pleasingly, then offers a cute 
acrobatic dance routine to a fine hand. Jim, a seven- 
foot Siberian bear, follows with a Hula dance and 
then wrestles with two men who are offered five 
dollars each to wrestle Jim. 

Little Rnssel Kay came next playing "Breezin" 
Along" on a small sax, then sang "Gorgeous" to Al 
and did a cute soft shoe dance that won a very fine 
reception. 

Abbott's Dancing Dolls next offered a .smart acro- 
■batic routine. 

Cloyd Griswold followed this with chorus of "Just 
a Memory" in front of small Christmas tree. Al and 
Cloyd, with faraway expressions on their faces, han- 
dle different toys and reminisce on their childhood. 
Al picks up a fife and plays a good solo of "Silent 
Night." Griswold then finishes with "Just a Mem- 
ory." Both received a very good hand. 

Two dolls dancing to "Hallelujah" as streamers 
of lights and tinsel is lowered as a beautiful lighted 
star is lowered for the finale. 



St. Louis Missouri 

Week Ending December 30 

The Missouri had a regular Christmas show in 
"keeping with the Yuletide season. 

The upper stage was arranged like a brick fire- 
place with stockings hanging from the mantel while 
two huge Christmas trees formed the banks on either 
-side. 

The acts on the bill of fare ranged from singing, 
dancing and comedy to contortion and magic by 
the Luster Brothers. The climax was the appearance 
of Santa Claus on the stage. He distributed toys 
to the Missouri girls and they in turn ran from the 
stage to give the gifts to children in the audience. 



Kansas City Mainstreet 

Week Ending December 30 

The Oska Boys in "Japanese Pastimes" topped the 
stage program at the Mainstreet this week. Walter 
Davidson aud his Louisville Loons played their 
twenty-seventh week as the stage orchestra attrac- 
tion, rendering popular selections as an overture. 

William CoUey, 5-year-old youth, proved an efficient 
musician with a harmonica and piano. Bobbie 
Randall was seen in the role of a comedian, v?hile 
Saxton and Carol are two good looking girls who 
know how to dance the black bottom. A Chinese 
version of the Apache dance is done by Bertin and 
Leo. James Grady, tenor, is seen in pleasing vocal 
mumbei-6, while Saranoff is a dialect comedian. 



also knows the value of "selling a song" to the 
audience. 

The girls were on again for a chicken dance done 
very cute with Antoinette Fabarius, one of the eight, 
stepping out for a solo bit at the finish. 

Breen Brothers were next with their dance as done 
in the show "Cocoanuts" helped put them over. 

The Finale was "Let a Smile Be Your Umbrella," 
with the band first singing it, then entire company 
with girls in back on elevator stage. Best applause 
heard on finish of act here yet. During the number 
a scrim drop was let down bearing Happy New 
Year on it. Show title, "Hello 1928." 

Overture as played by Don Albert and Orchestra 
was "Dance of the Hours" and Dick Liebert at the 
organ did a solo combining pop songs of 1927 and 
then introducing two hits for 1928. 

Feature was "Love" with Gilbert and Garbo. 



Milwaukee Wisconsin 

Week Ending December 30 

The stage band of the Wisconsin this week have 
appropriately called their presentation, "Bye, Bye, 
1927." It opens with a drop of large newspapers 
carrying headlines of some of the leading events of 
the year 1927, including Lindbergh's flight, Dempsey- 
Tunney fight, and Coolidge's slogan, "I Do Not 
Choose to Run." From behind each of these sheets, 
one of the Abbott Dancers bursts forth appropriately 
dressed for the banner line on the news sheet. Each 
do a little dance and receives good applause, for it is 
a real clever introduction, well executed. 

The orchestra then plays a selection entitled, "Bye, 
Bye, 1927," which is done in their usual effective 
manner. The orchestra number is followed by 
George Boyce, who shows the audience some snappy 
soft shoe dancing, and for which he receives big 
applause. 

Helen Kennedy, a tall miss, sang with plenty of 
pep and not at all a bad voice, a number of 
popular songs, including "Hello Cutie" and "Dew 
Dewy Day." She had a fairly pleasing personality 
and made a good hit. 

"Madame Bebbe" was the next number by the 
orchestra done in good style with the various mem- 
bers of the band singing snatches of the song. 

And now the Abbott Dancers in black costumes 
did their stuff to the tune of the orchestra in a 
hot dance number known as the Dixie stomp. The 
girls worked nicely and drew good applause. 

"Highways Are Happy Ways" was played by the 
orchestra and Eddie Galbrecht sang in the chorus. 



Pittsburgh Penn 

Week Ending December 31 

The stage show this week compares favorably with 
anything this house has done since it opened. Dave 
Harman and Band and the Penn Rockets are held 
over. 

The curtain opens on the Rockets doing "The Doll 
Dance," done very well. Harman and the band next 
play a medley of waltzes. Including "Diane," a banjo 
• solo of "World Is Waiting for the Sunrise," and a 
string trio vrith "Sweetheart" from "Maytime," and 
finally a trombone solo by Dave, "My Hero." This 
number was well received. 

Bemis and Brown followed with their two collegiate 
dances and the surprise finish with the girl taking 
■off her hat proved she was a girl and not a boy 
got to the audience. 

George Dewey Washington with two songs tied up 
Tthe show and was forced to make a speech. His 
voice is unusual in quality and tone value and he 



BiUy 
RandaU 

the 

"Singing-Dancing 
Violinist" 

STILL PLAYING 

DeLuxe Picture 
Houses 



Now Touring MARCUS LOEW CIR- 
CUIT. 

Direction — Wm. Morris Agency 




Dick 



Marjorie 



MAXWELL & LEE 

"Just Jesters" 




Just 
Completed 
a Successful 
Season in 
Picture Houses 

Watch This 
Space for 
Important 
Announce- 
ment 



taking Billy Meyers' place, who is sick. The number 
went over big for Eddie has a fairly good voice and 
he also obliged with singing "Little Gray Home in 
the West." 

And then none other than Sophie Tucker herself, 
who sings new songs and old favorites as only 
Sophie Tucker can sing them. She also aids the 
leader direct the band as well as singing, proving 
she is a versatile lady indeed. She pleased the 
audience nightly with such songs as "She Don't 
Wanna" and "Absolutely, Positively." With her 
ability to make enough people laugh she had the 
audience chuckling most of the time, and went over 
real big. Ted Shapiro at the piano for Tucker, 
proved himself no mean pianist as well. 

The grand finale brought the Six Abbott Dancers 
to the upper stage behind large drums which were 
lighted up from behind showing only the girls' 
silhouettes to the audience. The entire number was 
well staged and executed and inaugurated to Mil- 
waukee theatregoers the company's new price policy, 
which calls for a slight increase in prices on week- 
ends and holidays with a slight reduction at week-day 
matinees. It is also the first of a series of big 
stage presentations with big stars as Sophie Tucker, 
heading the presentations each week. 

All in all, with the exception of Tucker, one 
might say that the presentation was not a great 
deal better than those offered at lower prices. 

The photoplay was "The Gay Defender," with 
Richard Dix. 



Philadelphia Fox 

Week Ending December 31 

The presentation acts at the Fox constitute a very 
well-balanced and entertaining program, though there 
was nothing particularly characteristic of the holiday 
season except two large gaily-decorated and lighted 
Christmas trees, one on each side of the stage. 

Forbes Randolph's Kentucky Jubilee Choir, the out- 
standing feature of the bill, received a very enthusi- 
astic welcome. The setting was an old log cabin, in 
front of which were grouped eight colored singers clad 
in overalls and broad-brimmed straw hats. Their first 
number was "My Old Kentucky Home," followed by 
a humorous selection, after which they sang a beau- 
tiful and haunting negro spiritual that gripped the 
audience. This was followed by a camp meeting 
song accomi>anied by the usual handshaking and hal- 
lelujahs characteristic of a colored revival meeting. 
This is a wonderfully well-blended chorus and they 
carry off their act with such naturalness that the 



Have You Ordered 
Your Copy Yet? 

Buy from Your Local 
Music Store, 25 Per Copy 



9 



FfLMCgiKLOCK 

For Clockine Motion Pictures 



[ 




TIMING AND CUEING PAD 
-for 

OrganistsMusical Directors^. 

By RU MLPH BERLINER 



V31a Moret, Inc. 

Publishers 
Kress Bldg. San Frcuicisco 



58 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



audience is swept along- with its realism. The ap- 
plause was long and enthusiastic and the sole criti- 
cism wa6 that it was not long enough. 

Max Fisher and^his orchestra played the usual jazz 
selections exceptionally well. The members of the 
orchestra, including the leader, fourteen in number, 
were dressed in Pierrot costumes against a circular 
stained glass window, flanked on each side by a tall 
vase against blue curtains embroidered in silver, a 
very effective and ai-tistic setting. In addition to 
the orchestra's musical numbers, three of the boys 
sang various humorous songs, and one of them sang 
through a megaphone Irving Berlin's "Let's Start 
All Over Again." 

Art Clifton and Ned Brent, the bouncing rubber- 
legs of dance, are artists in their line and kept the 
house in amazement and uproar with their clever 
antics. Never once did they descend to slapstick to 
put over their act. 

Fred Harris and Julie Claire, in their dance from 
"The Love Song," gave a splendid exhibition of good 
teamwork. 

There was a Christmas medley overture by the 
Fox Theatre Orchestra. 



Chicago Granada 

Week Ending January 1 

This week's show at the Granada was called 
"Thunderland," featuring some velry good artists 
whose names were not given by the announcer. 

The first number on the program was "Change- 
less," by the orchestra. 

Walter Bradbury did not make much of an attempt 
to please with his singing of "Among My Souvenirs," 
but was called for an encore. 

"Fifty Years Ago" was the humorous ditty sung 
by a couple who came out riding an old-fashioned 
velocipede. They looked just like the characters on 
an old "tintype" and brought a big hand. A pleas- 
ing duet from "My Chocolate Soldier" was next 
given. 

The Loomis Twins were next singing "A Night in 
June" and "Say It Again." The dramatic reading 
to "O How I Miss You Tonight" was well received. 

The dancing girls did a clever ballet, aided by a 
male tap and eccentric dancer. 

For the last number three fellows did an amusing 
shell game ballyhoo that brought a lot of laughs. 
They played "At Sundovm" and "He's the Last 
Word" to a big hand. 

The finale was short and loud, but quite effective. 



Boston Metropolitan 

Week Ending December 30 

Christmas week brought with it an unusually at- 
tractive stage show entitled "High Lights," produced 
by John Murray Anderson. The orchestral prelude 
which opened the program was entitled "A Christ- 
mas Fantasy," and consisted of familiar carols sung 
by the Metropolitan Vocal Ensemble. The stage set- 
ting for this number was very effective. It repre- 
sented a street on Christmas eve, and with the 
aid of the camera the effect was given of snow 
falling before the houses. The carolers were in 
picturesque costume. Two lighted Christmas trees on 
either side of the orchestra gave the finishing 
touches. Arthur Martel's weekly organ classic com- 
bined opera and jazz in a selection entitled 
"Donizetti vs. Donaldson." 

Gene Rodemich and the Met Band as usual opened 
the stage show with a jazz number. Then Sherry 
Louise sang "Caro Nome," accompanied by the 
orchestra. Between her and the orchestra there was 
a gauze curtain beaded with rhinestones and tiny 
electric lights which twinkled and sparkled, making 
an attractive background for Sherry's song. 

A clever dance was put on next by the Foster 
Girls as the "Living Marionettes." They were in 
gayly colored costumes of red, yellow and green 
check, and their arms and legs were attached to 
strings suspended from above stage, which made 
them look like real marionettes. 

A syncopated highlight was next on the program 
in the person of Helen McFarland. She put pep into 
everything from a vocal rendering of "Is He My 
Boy Friend," and a snappy jazz dance, to a peppy 
xylophone solo. 

In contrast to this vivacious bit of humanity. 
Douglas Burley gave us a slow motion number. He 
apparently had no. bones in his body for he twisted 
himself up in such queer contortions. He made 
quite a hit when he leaned down and looked at 
the bottom of his foot with no effort at all. 

"I Told Them All About You" was played by the 
band here, although unannounced on the program. 
After this came the Foster Girls again, this time 
in a military tap. 

Lou Masse and Ambrose Dietrich then put on some 
acrobatic dancing. They were dressed as traffic cops, 
and their number was entitled "A Traffic Highlight." 

A comedy highlight, and the hit of the perform- 
ance was next, with Maizie Clifton and Billie de 
Rex as the two hard-boiled actresses. The scene 
was supposed to be in front of a Paris saloon, but 



AL KVALE 

AT 

Balaban and Katz 

NORSHORE THEATRE 
f CHICAGO 

With HARRY GOURFAIN and 
CHARLEY NIGGEMEYER and 
A Great Happy Family 

What More Could an Ex-Saxophonist Ask For? 




ARTHUR RICHTER 

SOLO ORGANIST 

WISCONSIN theatre, MILWAUKEE 



Return Engagements Everywhere !! 

HELKNE HELLER AND RILEY 

COMEDY SINGING DANCING 

Such Popularity Must Be Dpsoi vcd 
Now Pliiyinf: Deluxe Picture Houses. Direetion— M AX TURNER— Wm. Morris Ajiene: 

r. S.— i\IAKKKI,I, and FAl'N are now Dlu.viuft icliirn dntts for I'l'm.lX. 



they were so "tough" we thought they must be from 
down by the Winegar Wbiks. Their jokes and songs 
got three encores. 

For the finale the entire company contributed. The 
Foster Girls did another tap step, this time in avia- 
tion costirme. Masse and Dietrich in Russian costume 
did some fast dance steps, and Helen McFarland 
came back for a few minutes with her xylophone, 
while Sherry Louise sang "Where Lanterns Glow." 

The film was "Two Flaming Youths." 



Kansas City Capitol 

Week Ending December 31 

"The American Girl" was the stage production 
presented by the Bert Smith Revue company at the 
Capitol this week. Tuneful songs and splendid 
scenery were plentiful. Vi Shaffer again was seen 
as the feminine lead, while Billy Van Allen played 
the leading male role, both appearing in frequent 
song and dance numbers. 

"Chuck" Hoback also was seen in vocal numbers, 
as was Geneva Mick. The Golden Gate Four rendered 
several vocal numbers, while the Broadway Beauty 
Chorus did its share of the work. 

A medley of the songs used in the show was played 
by the Capitclites, the theatre's permanent orchestra, 
as an overture. 



Philadelphia Stanley 

Week Ending December 31 

The presentation acts at the Stanley this week 
were designed particularly to appeal to children, even 
the overture being an arrangement- of "Mary's Little 
Lamb," compiled by Gabriel Hines, with a Fitzpatric 
scenic film in colors showing the origin of the im- 
mortal nursery rhyme. Sascha Jacobibnoff, concert- 
meister, then played a beautiful violin solo, "Ave 
Maria," with harp accompaniment. 

A holiday divertissement, "The Stanley Christmas 
Party," with Catherine Littlefield and a cast of 
twenty and the Sylvania Concert Quartette, followed. 
The act was in three scenes. 

Scene 1. The Sleigh Ride. There was a moving 
background of wind-blown clouds as a horee drew 
an old-fashioned sleigh across the stage, while the 
Sylvania Concert Quartette sang "Jingle Bells." 

Scene 2. The Snow Glen. Beautiful scene showing 
snow-laden trees and winding roads as the quartette 
in spot sang "Silent Night" and "Joy to the World." 

Scene 3. Under the Christmas Tree. An elaborate 
act showing a bright fire burning in a grate and a 
gigantic gift-laden Christmas tree with a group of 
dolls and toys standing stiffly under the tree. This 
scene consisted of eight numbers. In the first, Emma 
Zuern, soprano, sang "Toyland." In the second, "The 
Awakening of the Toy Doll," Catherine Littlefield 
took the part of the doll most realistically. The next 
four numbers represented trick dolls, singing, danc- 
ing and acrobatic dolls and mechanical toys in action, 
the parts being taken by members of the Littlefield 
Ballet. 

The wooden soldier by Joseph Ross, with his clever 
acrobatic stunts, brought down the house, while the 
twin bears and the green monkey were especially 
good. 

Then there was a doll ballet by Catherine Little- 
field and her company and in the finale all of the 
dolls and toys paraded stiffly around the stage. The 
stiff, mechanical motions of the dolls and toys made 
it hard to believe that they were real flesh and blood, 
and the dim firelight and the character of the music 
made the illusion of a Christmas Eve frolic of toys 
complete. 

The Stanley staif, who staged and arranged the 
Christmas party, deserve great credit. 



Bennie Krueger 

Feature Attraction 

~ at — 

Balaban 
and Katz 

UPTOWN 

and 
TIVOLI 
Theatres, 
Chicago 




January 7, 1928 



EXfflBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



59 



Chicago Uptown 

Week Ending January 1 

The program at the Uptown this week was com- 
posed almost entirely of little folks, and the audience 
surely did like them. Bennie Krueger and his band 
supplied the music. 

Opening: The Morgan Dancers did a "Rabbit 
Dance," and while the band played "Silent Night" 
the "House of Mother Goose" was presented. The 
backdrop was illustrated with all the childhood story 
book characters, and a big pie covered the band, who 
played "Bye Bye, Blackbird." Then eight little tots 
who were dressed as fairy tale characters sang a 
group of the nursery rhymes. At this point Krueger 
arrived, and when the children all gathered around 
him, he said, "They think I'm Father Goose." 

The Morgan Dancers then did a "Babbit Dance" 
and the band followed with "Just a Memory," with a 
vocal chorus by Jackie Heller and a saxophone solo 
by Krueger that was excellent. 

"Two Little Blackberries" did a pleasing skit ; a 
revue performed to "Annabelle Lee," and a bouncing 
clown sang "No Wonder I'm Happy." 

Baby Jane was next playing a saxophone solo, 
"Let Me Call You Sweetheart," and then sang "Why 
Are You Jealous of Me?" A flapperette and two 
soldiers sang "Under the Moon" and did acrobatic 
dancing. 

Roberts and Clark presented a very novel act. The 
man was dressed in a bulldog outfit that was just 
about as realistic as it could be without being the 
real thing. His howling and antics caused many 
laughs. 

Some Irish "triplets" and some Dutch "twins" 
came out and added to tha color and completeness 
of the show. 

Tommy Wonder, who was reported in last week's 
Oriental report, again scored with his clever dancing. 

For the finale, the Morgan Drncers held torches 
spelling out the words "Merry Xmas" and screens 
of tinsel descended while the band played "Jingle 
Bells." 



Brooklyn Strand 

Week Ending December 30 

In celebration of Christmas Week managing director 
Edward L. Hyman presented an especial stage in- 
cident called "A Christmas Fantasy," which fully 
upheld the reputation of this house for offering pres- 
entations of timely interest. In addition, there was 
another stage number which offered stage band and 
featured artists. 

The feature photoplay was the comedy-drama, 
"French Dressing," which ran 1 hour and 10 minutes. 

The theatre front, lobby and interior were deco- 
rated with garlands of holly, etc., for Christmas and 
two large Christmas trees flanked the production 
stage. These trees were fully decorated and were 
used during the "Christmas Fantasy." This presen- 
tation, "in one" with a newsboy tenor coming out 
in front of the fabric draw curtains singing "Rags." 
A steel-blue spot from the dome covered the boy. 
At the conclusion he did a little pantomime of a news- 
boy trying to keep warm in the cold as the curtains 
slowly opened, disclosing a tableau in full stage be- 
hind a scrim of angels, these being the members of 
the ballet. 

Newsboy slowly made his exit as a soprano off stage 
sang "Holy Night" while the girls went through some 
specially prepared business. Four light blue spots 
from either side on the set and violet floods from 
the dome on scrim. 

At the conclusion of this the James A. Fitzpatrick 
technicolor film, "Mary's Little Lamb," was thrown 
on the screen while the Famed Mark Strand Or- 
chestra played the si>ecially scored music. After this 



Organs Use 18,000,000 
Pounds of Wind Daily 

( special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

TOLEDO, O., Jan. 4.— More than 
18,000,000 pounds of air are blown 
within the pipe organs of the United 
States every day to provide music 
in the nation's churches, theatres and 
auditoriums, according to figures 
compiled by ventilating engineers 
who are conducting a survey to show 
the important part that electrically 
controlled air plays in every phase 
of American life. Driven by power- 
ful blower type fans, veritable gales 
of wind pressure are created within 
the pipe organs to produce the res- 
onant musical notes from inanimate 
metal. In the modern p'pa organ, 
the fans are specially constructed 
with special motor, mounted as a unit 
on an absorbent foundation and pro- 
vided with a Bexible air pipe connec- 
tion so that not the slightest machine 
or air noise will magnify or travel 
through the quietness of a church or 
similar building. 



Ted Fiorito, on the piano, played his best known 
compositions. Two blue side spots on band and white 
spot on Fiorito. "Mellenberg Blues" was the next 
band offering, after which Caiferey and Miller, acro- 
batic danc3rs, did their stuff ; all lights white. The 
number closed with "Miss Anna Belle Lee." 



the screen was raised, disclosing a nursery set, in the 
center of which was a huge bed. Members of the 
ballet, 12 in number, were dressed in kiddie pajamas 
and went through a dance, after which they all piled 
into bed. 

Lights were dimmed as Santa Claus with pack on 
his back made his entrance singing Victor Herbert's 
"Toyland." The children awakened, discovered Santa 
and rushed to him, each getting toys and dolls. Tl , 
followed a novelty dance in which kiddie cars played 
a prominent part. Santa Claus then made his exit 
as the children retunied to bed. This "Christmas 
Fantasy" required 20 minutes in full. 

After the Topical Review, Ted Fiorito, the com- 
poser, appeared in full stage with his Victor Record- 
ing Orchestra of 12 musicians and went through a 
well balanced program. The routine, taking 20 min- 
utes, was as follows: the band opened with "Char- 
maine." Four amber spots and 4 blue spots covered 
the set ; bridges 1 and 2 amber floods, with dome 
also amber. 

Carelena Diamond, the dancing harpist, was the 
second number. She was covered by white spot from 
dome ; bridges oif. The drummer then came forward 
to sing a comedy song ; the dome covered him with 
an amber spot ; bridges 1 and 2 also amber. 



Pittsburgh Penn 

Week Ending December 24 

After a series of names this house ccmes back to 
the stagehand policy with added acts presenting a 
well balanced bill for its return, to the most popular 
picture house policy today. 

Dave Harman and his band opens the presentation 
playing "Pale Moon," using a special arrangement. 
The Penn Rockets, eight girls well trained, next do a 
number. Charles Gregory, who was planted in the 
band, steps out to do his musical specialty of playing 
a rubber glove, balloon, rubber tire and a saw. Next 
came the Capital Quartet, who pleased with three 
numbers. Lloyd and Brice stopped the show with 
their acrobatic act, well spattered with laughs. 

Dave, assisted by the bana, sung "That's a Good 
Girl" and the Penn Rockets on again for another 
dance. Murray and Alan, with two comedy num- 
bers. "Liars" and "10,000 Years Ago," came along 
and tied up the proceedings. 

The finale had everybody on the stage with the 
girls in the rear of the stage on the elevator, which 
came up with a lot of set pieces, all having thou- 
sands of mirrors on them, making a beautaful sight. 

An overture by Don Albert and the Penn Symphony 
Orchestra entitled "The Spirit of Christmas" had the 
Capitol Quartet and Virginia Futrelle singing "Holy 
Night" and "Adeste Fidelas" and scenic effects. The 
feature, "Body and Soul," with an "Our Gang" com- 
edy wound up the bill. 



Chicago Diversey 

Week Ending December 31 

The "Toy Shop" was the title of this week's stage 
show at the Diversey. 

The music by the Musical Funsters, who were led 
by Joe Kayser, was exceptionally pleasing. 

The opening music was a medley of childhood songs 
that was very well liked. After a revue by the 
dancing girls, Za Bell Thall did a toe dance to some 
unappropriate music. 

Fauntleroy and Van played "How Can I Call You 
Friend After I've Called You Sweetheart" on brooms, 
and then "The Old Grey Mare" on bellows. Their 
clogs, trick hick songs and "recitations" drew a big 
hand. 

Jazzlip Richardson was next with acrobatic and 
eccentric dancing to "Sing Me a Baby Song" and 
"Just Like a Butterfly." He went over big. 

The boys in the orchestra then dished up some hot 
and harmonious jazz, and the show closed with the 
revue by the dancing girls. 



Originator of the New Organ SCRIMAPHONE PRESENTATIONS 

Albert F. Brown 

FEATURED ORGANIST 
Alternating at the MARBRO and GRANADA Theatres, Chicago 
All Solos Conceived by Albert F. Brown and Staged by RAYMOND Q. DALTON 

KEPRESENTS A NEW ERA OF DE l.I'XE THEATRE ENTERTAINlNrENT 




CHARLES KALEY 

"The Singing Band Leader" 
An Exclusive COLUMBIA Artist 
Now conducting MARKS BROS. Presen- 
tations, alternating at MARBRO and 
GRANADA Theatres, Chicago. 



COSTUMES FOR RENT 

PAUL ASH uses a set of PARAMOUNT Costumes each week at the ORIENTAL 
Theatre, Chicago. We wUl Rent same outfits to OUT-OF-TOWN THEATRES 

PARAMOUNT COSTUMERS 

MRS. ALICE PIERCE, 
Telephone State 3465 Manager Room 600, Loop End Bldg. 



60 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 




ORGAN SOLOS 



(With Apologies to O. O. Mclntyre) 
The wide open spaces of Broadway, where 7th Ave. 
branches off in front of the Palace theatre. ... A 
big and beautiful Christmas tree in front of the 
Times building, bearing this message, "To all New 
York, and to the strangers within her gates." . . . 
Of all the unexpected things — in the very heart of 
the "alley," the biggest electric sign of them all says 
"CHICAGO." ... A blind man folds his pencil tray, 
sticks his "I am blind" sign in his coat, and scoots 
around the corner. . . . Irving Berlin in a hurry. 
... A birth control salesman in front of the Para- 
mount building. . . . The ballyhoo from uniformed 
attendants in front of the Paramount theatre. . . . 
The beautiful hundred foot soda foundtain in Wal- 
green's drug store. . . . Peacock Alley in the Astor 
Hotel, running from 44th street to 45th street, lined 
with beautiful women, waiting for someone (not me). 
. . . Taxicabs, all colors of the rainbow, and stream- 
ing by in hundreds. . . . Believe it or not, a music 
store with twenty-five people hanging around outside, 
and not a single soul inside. . . . Hope Hampton, in 
all her beauty. . . . Newsboys on every corner (by 
the way, did you know that some news stands along 
the "alley" ai-e worth twenty-five thousand dollars a 
year). . . . Four Rolls-Royces, one after another. . . . 
Too cold for Coney Island, so the bus venders take 
you through the Holland Tunn&l and return for four 
bits — that's if you want to go. . . . Something just 
passed in a hurry, may have been Lon Chaney. . . . 
Remember the old Claridge Hotel? (What a difference 
today!) . . . The Automat (always crowded). . . . 
Eddie Elkins, dashing to the Strand theatre stage 
entrance. . . . Terrific crowds, going to terrific shows. 
, . . Raccoon coats from Yale, Harvard, etc., in New 
York for the holidays. ... Of all people, O. O. 
Mclntyre himself (I blushed). . . . What ever happened 
to all those "mammy" singers ? . . . The famous 
corner of 47th street which resembles a local union 
•during the daytime (the difference being in price). . . . 
Flora Rnch, remember her? . . . With the exception 
of two, there are no more cafes or night clubs on the 
avenue ; they have all moved to the side streets, and 
the Chop Suey joints have taken their places. . . . 
Louis Mann (wing collar and all). . . . Charlie Isaac- 
son (a hustling Berlin plugger). ... At Fiftieth 
street, west bound pedestrian traffic going to the 
hockey game at Madison Square Garden. . . . Elec- 
trically lit antennas atop the Park Central Hotel (a 
sight for many questions). ... A few feet from 
the "alley" the Roxy theatre, doing a big business. . . . 
The Casa Lopez with Lopez standing out in front (to 
the delight of many flappers). . . . "What-ever-they- 
are" hanging around in front of Lindy's Restaurant. 
.... An old man with a monocle and a young girl 
with a dog, strolling together as if they were on the 
boardwalk in Atlantic City (I'm sure he wasn't her 
father). . . . Roseland, America's first big ballroom. 
. . . One block further up, the Arcadia Ballroom. 
. . . Both doing a good business and built with Phila- 
delphia money. . . . The Colony theatre, faring pretty 
badly (would make a marvelous "legit" house). . . . 
The crosstown elevator (holding up increases in prop- 
erty value). . . . Hammerstcin's new theatre, playing 
to capacity business with the "Golden Dawn." . . . 
From here to Columbus Circle its "epis" (if you know 
what I mean) so I grabbed a cab and went home. 
* * * 

RUMORS have it, that: Paul Whiteman intends 
leaving the Victor Company and joining the Colum- 
bia. . . . Walter Douglas and Addy Britt of the Wat^ 
terson, Berlin and Snyder organization are going into 
the music publishing business with the celebrated 
Walter Donaldson. . . . Paul Ash is to have his hair 
cut. . . . Philip Spitalny will soon be the maestro at 
the Hotel Pennsylvania. . . . Samson never knew 
Delilah. . . . Sammy Levy was barred out of Madison 
Square Garden. . . . Jimmy Carr isn't a doctor. . . . 
Jack. Robins owns a piece of Variety. . . . The Variety 
owns a piece of Jack Robins (anyway you want it). 
. . . Eddie Foy is a bachelor. . . . Gene Austin is 
colored. , , « 

There, now, you have the latest "dirt" — make the 
most of it ! I ! ! ! I ! ! 



Milton Charles (Chicago Oriental) entitled his solo 
this week "Sing Out the Old, Sing in the New," and 
the following songs were played, "Dream Kisses," 
"Is She My Girl Friend?," "Just a Memory," "Auld 
Lang Syne," "My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean," 
"Crazy Words," "Ain't She Sweet?," "At Sundown," 
"Sing Me a Baby Song," and "My Blue Heaven." 
This is one of the many novel stunts that Charles is 
noted for originating. 



Julia Dawn (Houston Kirby) used as a special 
Christmas overture a production prepared by Manager 
Floyd Smith. The orchestra played the opening bars 
of "Holy Night" and the work curtain opened re- 
vealing Julia Dawn, the Kirby's golden voiced organ- 
ist in front of a gray drop, attached to which was a 
shadow box representing a huge cross. On each side 
of the cross was a large Christmas wreath, centered 
by a burning candle. Miss Dawn sang, in her clear 
soprano, "Holy Night." At close of chorus the cur- 
tains came down with orchestra completing number 
with a fan flare of joyous melody. Wade Crosby, 
art director for Publix Theatres in Houston, designed 
the set. 



Edmund Fitch (Chicago Sheridan) played the 
week ending December 11, "Sextette from Lucia." 
and "Vo-do-de-o-do, " "Barcarolle from Tales of 
Hoffman," "She Don't Wanna," "Are You Happy?" 
"Is She My Girl Friend?" and "Memory Blues," in 
the usual Fitch symphonic style that was well re- 
ceived. 



Muth (San Antonio, Texas) offers "The Organ 
Speaks" this week, with a special introductory trailer 
which explains that the organ is capable of imitat- 
ing the most intricate instruments, bands, symphonies, 
etc. He then goes into the slides, showing the 
origination of the organ from the cathedral instru- 
ment, and then playing to represent jazz bands, 
martial bands, symphonies, and various instruments. 
The number went over great, and Muth got one of 
the best hands all week that he has received in 
a long while. 



Henri A. Keats ((Chicago Uptown). The first slide 
read "At Your Service" and those following told 
of his being at McVickers theatre, and asking all 
those in the audience to help him uphold his repu- 
tation by singing. He used the music of "It All 
Depends on You" for this and then played "Are You 
Happy?," "Did You Mean It When You Said I Love 
You?," "A Night in June." One of the slides read 
"Singing denotes happiness, lets start the New Year 
right." After playing "My Blue Heaven" as his 
last number he was applauded until he gave as an 
encore "Jtist Once Again." 



Edward K. House (Chicago Granada) played "Hail, 
Hail, the Gang's All Here" while the opening slide 
said "Happy New Year." Then House announced 
that although everyone was looking forward to the 
new year, he believed the audience would like to sing 
some of the old year's songs, and the following were 
selected: "Memories," "Down by the Old Mill 
Stream," "East Side, West Side," "My Irish Rose," 
"In the Shade of the Old Apple Tree," and "Auld 
Lang Syne." He then played two or three new songs 
that were well received. 



New 500 Seat Houses 

Open in Pittsburgh 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

PITTSBURGH, Jan. 4.— The New Roxy, 
500 seat theatre, opened here December 26, 
with Tii¥any-Stahls, "The Haunted Ship." The 
New Roxy has been built by the Floyd 
brothers, who have operated the Family the- 
atre here for some years. Joseph De Lisi, 
owner of the Liberty theatre in Saltsburg, 
opened his beautiful new Delmore theatre at 
Avenmore on, Monday Dec. 19th. The new 
house seats 400 people, is a two story structure, 
with apartments and storerooms. 



niPuMj^a ec^ of- 

Momhlv SLIDE ne^e U^b^ 
for and. about thcGDGANIST 

lop. ^a^fc&e, 




5^ W QANDOlPU 6T CHiCJOO 



SIP $4 

atou^ 




STILL NUMBER ONE! 

"My Blue Heaven" (Leo Feisi). 

Coming Fast! 

"Among My Souvenirs" (DeSylva- 
Brown & Henderson). 

NEXT BEST SELLERS 

"The Song Is Ended" (Irving Berlin). 
"Charmaine" (Sherman Clay). 
"Just a Memory" (Harms). 
"The Desert Song" (Harms). 

HENRY'S MADE A LADY OUT OF LIZZIE— (De 
Sylva, Brown & Henderson) — ^An excellent comedy 
song with the new Ford car as an angle. Is getting 
one of the best radio plugs on the market. Looks 
like one of those things that will make an impression 
all over the country. Words and music by a new 
writer, Walter O'Keefe. 

* * * 

WE'LL HAVE A NEW HOME IN THE MORNIN' 
— (Irving Berlin, Inc.) — One of the tuneful songs in 
the Gene Buck production, "Take the Air," now 
playing in New York. By the way, one of my 
favorites is starring in the show, none other than 
Will Mahoney. Melody and lyric by Gene Buck, 
J. Russell Robinson and Willard Robinson. 

« 4 « 

SOL' AWAY TO GEORGIA— (Robbins Music 
Corp.) — I don't know what this means, but it's the 
theme song of the moving picture version of "Uncle 
Tom's Cabin." Words and music by Eva Jessye. 

« « « 

THE WALTZ OF LOVE— (Ted Browne Music Co.) 

— A pretty waltz number by Ted Koehler and Joe 
Verges. A story of love in a ballroom. 

* * * 

ROSALIE — (Harms, Inc.) — Sigmund Romberg and 
George Gershwin, two of the greatest, collaborated 
and the result couldn't help but be 100 per cent in 
the Ziegfeld production of the same name, featuring 
Marilyn Miller and Jack Donahue. 

* * * 

WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR, MARY?— (Leo 
Feist, Inc.) — A song with an original lilt that is both 
infectious and melodious. I heard Mark Fisher sing 
it for the first time at a Christmas benefit at the 
Oriental theatre and it sounded great. Walter 
Donaldson wrote it — enuf said. 

« * « 

JAPANSY — (Harms, Inc.) — AI Bryan, who wrote 
the lyric, as usual has an unusual play on words. 
This number is of the melodious type, handled in 
an Oriental manner and arranged as a waltz. 

* * » 

AMONG MY SOUVENIRS— (De Sylva, Brown & 
Henderson) — This is a repeater but will again say 
that this looks like one of the biggest hits of 1928. 
Both the lyric and melody are perfect. Words by 
Edgar Leslie, music by Horatio Nicholls. 

* * * 

MY MELANCHOLY BABY— (Joe Morris Music 
Co.) — A melancholy fox trot ballad with a tinge 
of blue. Another come-back song. This one also 
was a big hit several years ago but has a great 
opportunity of duplicating this feat as it is a great 
song. Words by Geo. A. Norton, music by Ernie 
Burnett. 

« * « 

VOICE OF THE SOUTHLAND— (Austin, Bloom 
& Koehler, Inc.) — A new Dixie song by a new firm 
which is headed by Gene Austin, The Victor Record 
Star. Austin has the ability, single handed, to start 
the song. Co-writers, Max-ty Bloom and Ted Koehler. 
s * * 

WHY DO YOU TELL ME YOU LOVE ME— (Ted 
Browne Music Co.)— Written by Gene Austin who 
has quite a name in the record world. This should 
give it quite a start. A fox trot melody with a nice 
story in the lyric. 

« • « 

THE SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS— (Irving Berlin. 
Inc.) — The theme song of the picture of the same 
name. It ought to be good as it is by the writers 
of the famous "Among My Souvenirs," by Edgar 
Leslie and Horatio Nicholls. 

« ^ # 

P. S. — Have you made your New Year's resolutions? 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



61 



SERVICE TALKS 



Incorporated in this department of Exhibitors Herald, which is a department containing news, in- 
formation and gossip on current productions, is the Moving Picture World department, ^'Through 

the Box Office Window^" 



WELCOME— Am LISTEN! 

W ELCOME — all you interesting and, I 
trust, interested new readers — and listen:' — You 
are just in time to hear the regular monthly 
explanation of the fundamental and quite im- 
portant differences distinguishing the "Service 
Talks" which appear in this space from the so- 
called "box office reviews" which have appeared 
and continue to appear, for some more or less 
obscure reason, in the trade journals published 
under other than this banner. If I ramble 
somewhat, even becoming autobiographical, 
please be patient. It's a big sidjject. And if I 
do not make myself wholly clear, please do not 
hesitate to write in and demand additional 
statistics. Or, if you prefer, wait four weeks 
until the next regular monthly thesis on the 
subject. The explanation for January follows: 
The "Service Talk" is, in simple, one man's 
opinion of a motion picture. The "box office 
review" is, of course, one man's opinion of a 
picture also. Here the similarity ceases. As 
to wit: 

Whereas the man writing a "box office re- 
view" pretends to be gifted with some sort of 
second sight which enables him to tell his 
readers, in advance of exhibition, the amount of 
money the picture will or will not draw to the 
theatres in which it may be exhibited, the man 
writing a "Service Talk" pretends to be noth- 
ing more than a human being with a fairly 
representative knowledge of current product 
and with no second sight of any sort. The 
writer of a "Service Talk," therefore, does not 
make random guesses about box office attrac- 
tion power, money-making qualities or enter- 
tainment reactions. The reason is— and here 
the autobiography begins — this: 

For better than nine years this paper did 
maintain, I blush to admit, that its reviewers, 
carefully selected and well paid eye-and-type- 
writer men, could guess the earning power of 
an untried picture by looking at it. During 
those nine years, however, this paper also con- 
ducted a "What the Picture Did for Me" depart- 
ment, wherein exhibitors wrote actual box 
office reports of actual exhibitions, and a com- 
parison of actual exhibition records with re- 
viewers' predictions, previously published, told 
its own very plain story. That story is, simply, 
that it can't be done. To make doubly sure, 
to remove the possibility that unfortunate selec- 
tion of reviewers had been made, the files of 
contemporary publications were searched and 
similar comparisons made. This clinched the 



By T. O. SERVICE 

conclusion that no mere human being can look 
at a new picture upon the screen and success- 
fully predict its earning capacity. Incidentally, 
and it is curious that no one thought of this 
before, it became evident that any human being 
who could make successful predictions would 
be no less than an imbecile to write mere re- 
views when he could so easily amass untold 
wealth by running a theatre. 

When these investigations were completed, 
and these are but a few of the checks and 
cross-checks applied to the "box offive review," 
the institution was booted bodily out of the 
paper and the present plain and unpretentious 
department of personal opinions substituted. 
The "Service Talk," it now is quite generally 
admitted, provides adequate answer tol the 
traditional trade inquiry, "How'd you like the 
picture " and of course that's all anybody ever 
wanted to know anyway. It has other advan- 
tages: 

It is more plainly a personal opinion, hence 
less likely to mislead exhibitors into buying 
pictures by guess. 

It is less involved in structure, hence easier 
to read. 

It is less pretentious — in fact not pretentious 
at all — hence easy to forget when it does not 
jibe with reader opinion and to remember when 
it does. 

It is what it seems to be, nothing more nor 
less, without mystery or fake whiskers, and I 
hope you grow to like the department whether 
you agree with each and every "Service Talk" 
or not. 

(P. S. — And perhaps this is a good place to 
quote a letter from James Hare, County Thea- 
tre, Bangor, N. Wales, who states, among other 
paragraphs praiseful of this book, "/ have found 
Service Talks particularly helpful." May the 
same good fortune attend each and every one 
of you.) 

"LOVES OF CARMEN" 

OU who have been in the business since 
it was young, or relatively so, no doubt remem- 
ber the year when Fox and Famous burned up 
studio overhead and overtime in getting out 
their respective and hotly competitive versions 



of "Carmen." You recall that Bara did it for 
Fox, Farrar for Famous, and that the trade was 
swept for a time with the never satisfactorily 
settled argument that one (or the other) was 
better than the other (whichever it was). If I 
recall correctly, I cast my vote for the Farrar 
version, which may have been due to an 
assumption that, having sung the thing, she 
should know more about its enactment than 
the songless Bara. However — 

It was several years later, I forget just how 
many, that First National imported the Negri 
version of "Carmen," made abroad, and ex- 
hibited it in this country under title of "Gypsy 
Blood." An interesting sidelight on this, if 
confessions are as interesting as the success 
of confessional magazines seems to indicate, 
consists of the fact that I saw this picture in a 
projection room (on one of my last visits to 
such places, for cause) and pronounced it a 
whale. It turned out, as you know, to be a 
snail. Anyway — 

The medal which should go to the producer 
doing the best job of "Carmen" for the screen 
now may be wrapped up and forwarded to 
William Fox, whose "Loves of Carmen" is an 
expanded and ornamented but extremely engag- 
ing version of the old, old story. I think this 
Fox version of the picture should go down in 
history as "the camera Carmen," for liberties 
taken with the script have been in aU cases 
productive of immense camera benefits. The 
finished product is a brighter, snappier, more 
interesting "Carmen" than I would have be- 
lieved could be contrived at this late date. 

This Carmen is portrayed by Dolores Del Rio, 
and at this point I wish to suggest that Pola 
Negri, Geraldine Farrar and Theda Bara look 
at this specimen if they would know what was 
wrong with their efforts in the piece. This girl 
acts, without acting, snaps without cracking and 
hits without stinging. She is my idea of the 
right actress in the right place, and may Fox 
find many more roles as good for her as this 
one. I'U guarantee to report each of them 
faithfully, though their observation take me to 
ihe darkest wilds of South Chicago. 

The other big factor in this version of the 
picture, visibly, is Victor McLaglen. His 
Escamillo is the first I've seen that looked like 
the fellow might kill a bull if he had a mind 
to do so. McLaglen, the picture makes one feel, 
would not be at all disturbed by a herd of 
bulls on a lone prairie. And for his handling 



62 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



of the amorous duties imposed by the story he 
deserves what Tex Guinan calls a big hand. 

Atop of which, and extremely important, the 
direction of one Raoul Walsh (who may have 
directed the Bara version for all I know) stands 
up prominently among the assets. He has had 
his flops, some of them memorable, but this 
picture makes up for all of them so far as I'm 
concerned. 

Look at "The Loves of Carmen" if you like 
to look at good pictures. 

"THE. DOVE" 

T 

X WENT to the new United Artists theatre 
four days after the opening, purposely delaying 
my visit to escape first night congestion and 
to permit the program to "set," and I feel I 
should have waited at least another week. I'm 
sure I should have waited until "The Dove" 
had flown, and surely another week would have 
witnessed that phenomenon. And phenomenon 
is the right word, for if "The Dove" can fly 
there is nothing distinctive about Lindbergh. 
As, of course, there is. 

"The Dove" was a stage play. It was a 
vehicle for Holbrook Blinn. It ran pretty well 
in the major metropoli and Blinn was the 
show. Made into a picture, for Norma Tal- 
madge, with Noah Beery attempting the Blinn 
role with captional inflections intended to re- 
produce the orality of the stage play, it may or 
may not make a million dollars (which is, as 
stated, none of my concern) but it certainly 
isn't a snappy evening for such as I. Indeed, 
I stayed to the finish out of no more fascinating 
motive than an abiding sense of fair play and 
an appended, if thin, hope that something might 
yet transpire to make it all worth while. Noth- 
ing did. 

The story, if indeed it be a story, concerns 
a dance hall gal in a place that looks like Spain 
and "the best damn cabaUero" in those parts, 
the) word meaning gentleman, according to 
caption, and the individual being the reverse 
thereof. Miss Talmadge is the girl, Mr. Beery 
the man. Miss Talmadge's new leading man 
(whose name I never remember) is the boy 
friend and there are other people, plenty of 
them, in the cast. Told in State Street lan- 
guage, which puts it more briefly and at least 
as pleasantly, "the guy don't make the grade 
and the dame cops." Endless scenes get this 
intriguing information across, amid endless 
sets and innumerable close-ups of Beery's teeth, 
tongue, palate, larynx — in fact I looked away 
from the screen several times lest the dis- 
closures become even more personal. The only 
thing in the picture less pleasant than these 
lens explorations of Mr. Beery's esophageal 
regions are the scenes showing his American 
friend, whose name I missed, ridding himself 
of spirituous liquors by the most expedient 
method. And aU these things in a Norma 
Talmadge picture, in a nice new theatre, on a 
nice Winter's evening at 75 cents the copy to 
the excellent accompaniment) of Dr. Hugo 
Riesenfeld's orchestra. 

I think, although it's entirely beside the 
point, that the picture might have been made 
eyeable by the presence of Mr. Blinn, whose 
Spaniards are DeLuxe, but I am quite sure 
there wasn't a picture in "The Dove" to begin 
with and so there was little or no chance of 



This is an introductory service 
to the readers of Moving Picture 
World, and it is the hope of Mr. 
Service that every new reader finds 
in this department information of 
inestimable value to him. 



getting one out of it. Sorry, too, for Miss 
Talmadge, whose pictures now, by the book, 
should be at their best. 

"THE GORILLA" 

D ESPITE every effort to the contrary, I 
came in upon the middle reelage of "The 
GoriUa" and of course that was my hard luck. 
It wasn't spooky, after that, and so of course 
the comedy wasn't a scream either. But, I am 
very sure, that was my misfortune. The luckier 
people who got in before the thing started 
seemed to be having the time of their lives, 
screaming one moment with laughter and the 
next with fear. From this testimony: 

It seemed that Charles Murray's humor was 
at its peak as the dumb detective, that the 
mystery surrounding the identity of the mur- 
derer was quite successfully maintained, and 
that the whole elicited about the required 
amount of audible reaction from the assembled 
witnesses. Isn't that all you ask of a spook 
comedy? If it is, and it must be, "The Gorilla" 
has it. 

"THE VALLEY OF THE GIANTS" 

T 

X HEY, who should know, tell me that 
Milton Sills was Professor of Psychology at the 
University of Chicago for four years before 
taking to the easier psychology — and money 
— of the films. If this be true, and his pictures 
make me doubt it, I should like to know why 
Mr. Sills does not apply himself to his no doubt 
treasured text books before attacking his next 
picture — or letting his next picture attack him, 
if that's the case. Or, if by any chance Mr. 
SUls has already consulted such text books, 
I should like to know their titles so that I can 
inform Mayor Thompson of his oversight in 
not having these dreadful tomes burned at the 
lake front. For — and now I get to my story — 
Mr. Sills has not had an adult picture in so 
long that I'm beginning to doubt the existence 
of Santa Claus. 

This one, "The Valley of the Giants," starts 
out beautifully. It begins with magnificent 
scenes showing the California Redwoods fore, 
aft and alongside. The trees play their roles 
splendidly, as does the camera man, but aside 
from that the picture is quite a terrible bore. 
The story enacted in this scene — and maybe this 
is the trouble — could as well be laid in a 
Carolina pine camp, a Tennessee plantation, a 
Montana _ ranch or the vaguely defined and 
much maligned Northwoods. It just isn't big. 
In fact, it might be written thus: The hero had 
a couple of scraps with the villain and won 
the second one. (A Dempseyite would add 
that he got a 14 count in the first session, but 
that would be a dirty dig.) 

In all sincerity, I am very much in favor of 
Milton Sills' continuance in pictures and as a 



star of the first rank. He's a great fellow, a 
wholly masculine type, a good battler and, 
apparently, a square shooter. All he needs, it 
seems, is a story to work in, for mere camera 
fodder doesn't look like much alongside his 
burly frame. And I know that stories good 
enough for an actor like this are rare. This 
explains my wish, above, that Mr. Sills would 
look at his text books and cook up a yam 
for himself which would engage the attention 
of citizens older than six years. If he finds 
none of them there, and if they come not to 
hand from other sources, let me suggest that 
he refrain from appearing in pictures until 
time brings to his desk, as inevitably it must, 
a yarn worthy of his efEorts. 

"The Valley of the Giants" is the old scrap 
about the lumber lands, done again and not 
so well. 

"SPOTLIGHT" 

STHER RALSTON is back in her element 
again, and good again, in "Spotlight." That 
makes it a good picture. It is light, likeable 
and pictorially attractive, as Miss Ralston's 
pictures should be. If the story has marks of 
familiarity, it has distinguishing marks as well, 
these mainly in the form of clever camera 
slants, neat captions, directorial niceties and a 
general suavity which gives a big lift to the 
proceedings. 

Miss Ralston, in this case, comes into the 
picture a dumb blonde, is made a Russian 
brunette and an actress for publicity pictures, 
finds love in the camouflaged section of her 
role and emerges — as you shall see if you see 
the picture. In the enactment of the unvital, 
unpretentious and eminently charming little 
anecdote the star and her several aides get 
over a lot of good stuff. It's a good picture. 

I like Miss Ralston, as veteran readers of 
these columns will attest, for several reasons, 
not the least of them being more prominently 
displayed in previous vehicles than in this one. 
That I like her as well in this, when her golden 
tresses are doused beneath a nightblack wig 
and the sheathing is rather complete through- 
out, must be a tribute to the lady's acting abil- 
ity. I had not suspected, I may as well confess, 
that this latter was among her possessions. Glad 
to note it. 

Yes, "The Spotlight," or maybe it's just "Spot- 
light," is an excellent little picture, not a tre- 
mendous thing nor an unforgettable one, just 
one of those nice little evening's entertainments 
that the theatre never yet has had enough of 
at a given time. More — more of the same. 

"LOVE" 

I T was my misfortune, if you look at it that 
way, to read Edgar Saltus' "The Imperial Orgy" 
the evening before I went to the Roosevelt to 
see "Love," which is Hollj^vood jargon for 
"Anna Karenina." Accordingly, I disbelieved 
the blather about the "honor" and such of the 
Russian court and I doubted various other 
aspects of the yarn — but the fact that it im- 
pressed nie as a pretty good picture in spite of 
these things seems to be in its favor. Yes, it 
must have been good, for when I can watch 
Greta Garbo grieve for reel upon reel because 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



/ 

63 



PRESIDENT R. F. WOODHULL OF THE M. P. T. O. A. (below the Hag and leaning forward) and M. J. O'Toole (directly across 
from WoodhuU and with glasses) were guests of the A. M. P. A. at the Christmas luncheon party in the Cafe Boulevard in New 
York. 



her stupid husband believes she shouldn't come 
home from her sweeties to fondle the boy- 
child, there is no explanation save that of 
virtue — I am referring to the picture. Yes, 
I'm sure it's a good picture, although I don't 
know why. 

Maybe it's the glitter of the uniforms that I 
liked, or maybe the Gilbert of this kind of 
picture is a pretty distinctive figure, or maybe 
there was curiosity to see what they had done 
to the story after they decided — and if they 
decided — it wasn't quite suitable for the picture 
houses as written. Anyway— 

I did sit through "Love," although it was 
very late and although I'd have gone else- 
where had I not seen all the other pictures in 
convenient radius, and I did note there were 
many people at the Roosevelt to see the thing 
on a night when not many people are expected 
to be at the Roosevelt for any reason, and 
maybe that's enough reason for thinking that 
"Love" is a pretty good picture. I think I'll 
just pass it along to you with these observa- 
tions. 

"TOODLES" 

J. OODLES"— or maybe it's "Toddles"— 
is the first of the short Paramount pictures I've 



seen, perhaps because the Chicago theatres use 
so many "presentations" that they seldom have 
program time for more than one screen attrac- 
tion, and I believe the unit making these things 
has a chance to do some excellent stuif. The 
youngster is younger than most of the juvenile 
cinematics, and smart as v^ell as "cute." Fur- 
ther, this comedy, at least, is done without 
captions, which fact is not foolishly exploited. 
I have hopes for the project. I should like to 
request, however, that other incidents on a 
level with the ancient drunken-duck stuff in 
this one be shelved as (1) too old for use and 
(2) badly out of key with the juvenile idea of 
comedy. 

"BRIDGES" 

Bridges around the world" is 

the title of an extremely interesting scenic used 
on the opening program of the United Artists 
theatre in Chicago. The thing has a good 
central idea which is well followed throughout. 
Too, the local projectors of the thing have 
hooked on a civic interest touch by finishing 
with views of the chief bridge in these parts, a 
touch worth remembering and one which 
brought applause. 



OVR GANG 

0 UR gang are something like their old 
selves in the comedy I saw last week, the title 
of which was lost in the folds of the screen 
drape. It is the one in which the hypnotist 
makes the children believe they are various 
animals. The action is snappy and there is 
something, at least enough, in the basic idea. 
More luck to the kiddies. 

NEWS REVIEWS 

1 HAVE seen several of the newsreel "annual 
reviews" and have seen none that are bad. The 
best, I believe, is the Pathe edition seen at a 
downtown theatre the other night, which re- 
peated local news events almost exclusively 
and finished with Lindbergh. Showmanship 
here — and what a rare quality in newspictures 
or elsewhere. But need we wait a full year 
for these flashbacks? Why not an item in each 
newsreel, headed "One Year Ago Today" as 
the newspapers use items originally published 
"Ten Years Ago Today," etc., and who'll be 
first to introduce this feature? I make no 
charge whatever for the suggestion and I lay 
the idea before all and sundry newsreel editors 
simultaneously with the typing of the following 
period: 



TO WORLD READERS 

Service departments of MOVING PICTURE WORLD will be found on the folloiving pages of this issue of EXHIB- 



ITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD: 

"Selling the Picture to the Public" 64 

"Through the Box Office Window" 61 

"Quick Reference Picture Chart" 69 

"Better Projection" 50 

"Little Pictures with the Big Punch" T 47 

"Hollywood" ; 40 

"Straight from the Shoulder Reports" 79 

"Live News from Coast to Coast" 46 

"This Week and Next" 36 

"Stage and Pit" 52 



64 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



THE THEATRE 



Incorporated in this department of practical shotvmanship of Exhibitors Herald are the Moving 
Picture World departments, "Selling the Picture to the Public" which was established September 
23, 1911, by Epes Winthrop Sargent, and "Better Business Builders." 



4^ 



The Theatre'' Begins the M. B. I. Club 



■My Best Idea Club 
Will Be Permanent 
Part of "Theatre ' 

With the first issue of Exhibitors 
Herald and Moving Picture 
World, "The Theatre begins a new 
feature for all theatremen, and here- 
with inaugurates the M. B. I. club. 

The membership will be composed of 
any and all theatremen interested in 



theatre exploitation and showrnanship. 
The club is created for the purpose of 
giving exhibitors a new theatre service 
and to furnish them with exploitation 
ideas that have proven to be successful. 

The initials stand for "My Best Idea." 
Your "My Best Idea" is the one of which 
you are most proud. Among all the good 
exploitations that you have put across 
during your years as a theatreman there is 
one exploitation that stands out above all 
the rest. It was a knockout and you are 
proud of it. It's the one you like to relate 
to fellow exhibitors when you get to- 
gether for a chat or a round of poker. 

Your "My Best Idea" is just the exploita- 
tion that "The Theatre" wants to hear 
about, and to give you an incentive to send 



Production Hints from Edward L. Hyman 

Managing Director, Mark Strand Theater, Brooklyn 



Our New Year program was designed to 
give young 1928 a big boost on his way to 
popularity and prosperity. This, not merely 
as a spurt for the inaugural week, but as 
conclusive proof that 
a still "bigger and 
better" policy is being 
put into practice, to 
remain the whole 52 
weeks. In the past 
we have won the con- 
fidence of our patrons 
not by occasional 
spurts but by giving 
more and more and 
better and better from 
week to week and 
month to month. 

This performance 
had as the feature 

photoplay the widelv ^j^^^j l. Ilyman 

discussed United 

Artists production, "Sorrell and Son," a some- 
what longer feature picture than is the usual 
thing here. This caused the shortening of the 
rest of the show, thus our entire attention 
was centered in the production of one big 
stage presentation which served to introduce 
a personality we have been advertising and 
exploiting for weeks. 

Art Kahn, who hails from Chicago and 
is new to the East, was advertised far and 
wide for the past three weeks as "That 
Rollicking, Rhythmic Master of Ceremonies," 
"The Ed Wynn of Music," "The Personality 
Playboy of Modern Music," "That Frolic- 
some, Friendly Fellow," etc. We al.so adver- 
tised the fact that he would appear with his 




stage band of "Twenty Talented, Tireless 
Musicians" and with favorite artists. It was 
our aim to make this inaugural appearance 
of Art Kahn in a big act a real epic of 
showmanship and after the first performance 
on Saturday, December 31, we knew he had 
got "over" in great shape. 

The entire length of this program was two 
hours and one minute, of which time "Sorrell 
and Son" required one hour and 36 minutes. 
This left 25 minutes for Kahn and his enter- 
taining accomplices, and on the upper show 
there was time to inject a two-reel comedy 
to run 20 minutes. 

"The All Night Club" was the programmed 
title of Kahn's first-week act. It opened with 
a film leader introducing Kahn and the va- 
rious entertainers. The silver draw curtains 
were then closed over the production stage, 
"In One," and a specially made film from the 
booth projected the exterior of a night club 
upon the curtains, with the words, "The All 
Night Club," flashing on and off the marquee. 
This film ran continuously as pedestrians 
made their way into the club, each having 
a "gag" to pull just before entering. In this 
way it was possible to work up Kahn's name 
before he appeared. 

With a black-out on the final gag the cur- 
tains opened disclosing the interior of the 
club, with tke 20 piece orchestra seated. Kahn 
wielded the baton and the band struck into 
"Blue Baby," the special arrangement giving 
various brass and string instruments a 
chance to get hot. Then Kahn introduced 
a number of performers, played some hot 
stuff on the piano and led his band through 
»,c\cral popular pieces. 



in your "My Best Idea," the club is being 
organized. 

The rules for membership are simple. Every 
exhibitor who sends in his "My Best Idea" is 
made a member of the M. B. I. club. 

As soon as you send in your "My Best 
Idea" and it appears in this department, 
you will receive a notice that you have 
been made a member, and you will also 
receive an attractive certificate of member- 
ship upon which is contained your "My 
Best Idea" just as it appeared in "The 
Theatre." The Certificate will make a fine 
appearance hanging on the wall of your 
private office, and it will preserve in print 
forever your "My Best Idea." After you 
have become a member, you won't have to 
tell other exhibitors about your "My Best 
Idea." You can show it to them. Now 
just a bit more about your "My Best Idea." 
It makes no difference what it is. It may 
have been an advertising campaign, or it 
may have been just one ad. It probably 
was some little stunt to develop good will 
for your theatre. It may be as old as the 
hills, or you may have put it over yesterday. 
But if you regard it as your "My Best 
Idea," write a short letter to "The Theatre" 
explaining what it is, and be sure to include 
your picture. 

"The Theatre" believes the M. B. I. club is 
going to be a great feature of this department. 
Remember that your "My Best Idea" may help 
some other exhibitor to boost his own business, 
and the "My Best Idea" of another exhibitor 
may help you to knock your old house record 
sky high. 

It makes no difference how big or how 
little your "My Best Idea" is. An exhibitor 
running the smallest theatre in the coun- 
try has just as much chance of becoming 
a member as the biggest exhibitor in the 
world, so send in your "My Best Idea" at 
once, and let "The Theatre" know what 
you think of the M. B. I. club. 



Redheads Get Passes 

During the showing of the "Parisian Red- 
heads," a woman's band composed entirely of 
girls with red hair, the Lyric theatre invited 
all redheads to be guests of the house. Co- 
operating with a local newspaper, the natural 

titian-headed women merely had to clip a 
coupon out of the newspaper and take it to 

the theatre, where, if the color of the hair 
was correct, they were admitted. 



Potatoes for Admission 

The neighborhood theatres of Indianapolis 
recently participated in an apple and potato 
matinee under the auspices of the Indorsers 
of Photoplays. The matinees were given espe- 
cially for children and the admission instead 
of money, was by foodstuffs, which in turn 
was distributed to the needy poor of the city. 



January 7, 1928 EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 65 

"Something for Nothing" Idea Wins 



you'll Love This! 

Our Coupoo Program Treat 




The bmth of th« Crcat Outdotirr; the boo- 
ty ol silken luxury; the vrip of throbbing 
dmms and the lure of brea^ileu romance are 
«onLalned In thla tUrring etory of a Man who 
wu Af rahL 



WARNER 
BAXTER 



e le olvars good tan, eomething 



■KcitlnK a 
n Uie CoK 



Prograins at Ui{ King 
Nfwa IB proud of the 
nuny FAMILIES that atteod. The 
happier, the more congenial for ttda 
^aj fun — tonlher. 



COME AND 
JOIN 

OUR HAPPY 
COUPON 
PARTY! 



KING THEATRE 
['■. r\ December 2n(l 

Mart at D^ ' _ 



Ewry ^rldsr Aftrmeon and F.«rnln)| 

THE moNroe county ^EWS 

EntcrUlo* lu Rudcn al thf 



Your Entertaimnent Coupon 

CAHhd and Prrwoipd ■! Ibc 

TlVOU THEATRE 

H'l-VI ONE PAID ADULT ADMISSION 
ADftUTS TWO 
THURSDAY, DECEMBER I 
To SEE 

ESTHER RALSTON 




BE THE GUESTS of Ihe OMAHA SUN. Use 
this Entertainment Coupon and enjoy this rol- 
licking Coupon Program Picture — 

"FIGURES DONT HE" 
with Corseouslj blonde ESTHER RALSTON. 




Every THURSDAY •flBaoon ud 
nini! it COUPON PROCRAM 
DAY •! Ihm 



Two Adult Ad 
«F \t\V ran thb liappy 

o»L\a.^ M N r.\itT¥. 



Happy Thanksgiving To You! 



Wednesday Only 

"The 
Desert 
Demon " 




"In Old Kentucky" 



A Btiutir. B«*n Interest 
Serean Ent«ruUiiiiMnt 
Deal ThaAlarlvlac Pun 
Be Here' 



S«turdky 
KEN 
MAYNARD 



Clip your Entertain- ■ 
mtnX Coupon NOW ^ 




\ Th. 



^ LINCOLN THEATRE 



Three ads which show how theatres in the Iowa territory are using two-for-one admissions to boost patronage. The 
local newspapers co-operate in the venture and give fine publicity. On the whole, these three ads are excellent. 
White space has been used to good advantage. The Tivoli ad could afford to have the name of the picture in larger 

type, particularly so because the illustration depends upon the name. 



Iowa Exhibitors Tieup with 

Papers on Two for One Plan 

Capitalizing on what they know of human nature, a group of Iowa motion pic- 
ture house managers, have successfully put over the entertainment coupon idea 
by giving the people "something for nothing." At least that is the reaction to 
the scheme of admitting one person holding a coupon when accompanied by 
another person holding a paid adult ticket. 

E. A. Schoneberger of the Tivolij^ South nothing. When that something proves to 



Omaha ; Kenneth Thompson of the King at 
Albia, Harry Mitchnik of the Lincoln in 
Chariton have proved the wisdom of such 
procedure in their towns. J. P. Martin of 
the Strand and Willard at Creston and P. D. 
Alleman of the Strand and Rialto at Clin- 
ton with probably others not listed are seri- 
ously considering the expediency of trying 
out the plan. 

Tieups with papers is the favored plan 
although the theatre often does a solo in 
advertising the strategy. The Omaha Sun 
helps Schoneberger; the Monroe County 
News helps the Albia house and the Leader 
backs Mitchnik at Chariton. In such cases 
the theatre uses its regular ad space for 
advance films and depends on the paper to 
advertise the coupon picture. 

When the paper acts as host, the pictures 
usually get plenty of notice and the houses 
draw well. One theory is that the coupon idea 
when used by the community, helps create the 
theatre habit. The lobby displays on advance 
bookings as well as trailer lure are vital factors 
in advertising the coming films. The manager 
figures that the patrons had better be at the 
movie seeing the advance notices than at home 
with no thought of the film world in mind. 

Papers in the smaller towns almost 
always have a corner devoted to news of 
the film world. This is supplied by pub- 
licity departments with which the theatres 
are allied or by the managers unless some 
outside service comes in to supply this 
gratis. 

Good will for the paper makes the plan 
popular in many towns, but the underlying 
thought is that of getting something for 



be worth while, the favorable attitude to- 
ward the theatre grows by leaps and 
bounds. 



Newsboys Entertained 
atU's "Shield of Honor'' 

Through the courtesy of William Raynor, 
manager of the Lafayette theatre, Buffalo, 
3,000 newsies clapped and cheered a special 
Saturday morning showing of "The Shield of 
Honor.' 

The Buffalo release of Universal's produc- 
tion featured the dedication of the picture to 
Chief of Police James W. Higgins and his 
force. Higgins' picture was published in the 
Times, and the interest of the whole city 
awakened. This is just an example of what 
this form of exploitation will mean ; there are 
477 other police chiefs' throughout the United 
States who will share this honor. 



Theatres, Store Tieup 

The Pagent, Lafayette, Maplewood, Grand- 
Florissant, Woodland, Powhattan, and New 
Michigan theatres of St. Louis and Maplwood, 
Mo., and the Lyric theatre. East St. Louis, 
111., have tied in with a popularity contest be- 
ing conducted by a number of merchants. 

It is promised that 20 girls will be taken 
on a free trip to Florida and Havana, Cuba. 
The merchants have contributed the $7,500 
needed to defray all the expenses of the trip 
for the girls. Standings of the contestants 




Put this in your scrapbook for 
Christmas ideas next year. There 
are 1,500 toys and 86 dolls ( count 
them) here. They were accepted as 
admissions by A. B. Leak, manager 
of the Lyric theatre, Huron, S. D., 
at a special performance and dis- 
tributed to the poor by the Boy 
Scouts. The stunt brought him four 
front page stories in the local news- 
papers. Laura La Plante, Universal 
star, looks as if she would like to 
have the kewpie doll. 

are shown nightly at the theatres. It is be- 
lieved this arrangement has attracted some 
business to the show houses. The contest is 
in the nature of a "Patronize Your Naborhood 
Dealers" drive. 



66 EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD January 7, 1928 




When the Grand theatre, Columbus, O., played the Warner picture, "Ham and 
Eggs at the Front," 500 newsboys were given a special performance, and the chef 
hats, shown in the picture, served as admission for the boys. 



'Lonely P. A. ^Breaks 
Theatre Record with 
''Love'' Radio Stunt 

Down in Memphis, Tennessee, at Loew's 
State theatre, there's a "lonely press agent" 
by the name of J. H. Burnett who breaks 
the monotony (?) of his existence by read- 
ing this department, and now and then he 
gets inspiration from it. When the theatre 
played "Love," the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
picture starring John Gilbert and Greta 
Garbo, he put over a novel radio exploitation 
that broke the house record. But read what 
he did in his own words: 

"There's a lonely press agent way down 
in Memphis, Tennessee, that's been read- 
ing the Herald consistently. He has ob- 
tained some mighty good ideas, too, by this 
aforementioned indulgence. He's been read- 
ing a lot about what Manager Bob Blair, 
down at the Texas theatre, San Antonio, 
has been doing. 



"It's been great stuf? and since a thing 
like that is somewhat contagious, it has 
prompted this lonely press agent to give 
the world what he believes to be an original 
exploitation idea on 'Love,' the Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer production with John Gil- 
bert and Greta Garbo. 

"During the week of December 19, Leona 
Lamar, heralded psychic, opened an en- 
gagement at Loew's State. The idea of a 
radio program was put over whereby Miss 
Lamar during her half hour on the air was 
to broadcast a thought message to the lis- 
teners. They were asked to write down the 
first 10 words that came into their minds 
during the minute's silence and mail them 
to a local paper. The Memphis Evening 
Appeal. The word, according to Miss La- 
mar's radio announcement, was to be one 
that meant a whole lot to everyone. The 
next day the paper announced that 'Love' 
was the 'key' word and Wednesday they 
broadcast it over the big station. We 
opened 'Love' Monday, December 26, to 
the largest crowd ever to visit the theatre. 

"How's that, Mr. Blair?" 



One Ad Pays Cost 
of 73,000 Programs 
for Eleven Houses 

The eleven Milwaukee Theatre Circuit 
houses under the direction of N. J. Blum- 
berg, put Carl Laemmle's Joy Week, Dec. 
25 to 31, over in great shape. D. J. Gold- 
man, manager of the Downer theatre, ar- 
ranged with a well known Milwaukee shoe 
man to have his advertisement appear on 
75,000 calendars distributed at the various 
theatres. 

These calendars, printed on heavy card- 
board and measuring about 8x9 inches, 
were distributed at each of the 11 houses, 
the name of the theatre and manager as 
well appearing on the calendar at the re- 
spective theatres at which they were dis- 



When the 11 Milwaukee Theatre Cir- 
cuit houses observed Universal's 
"Joy Week," D. J. Goldman of the 
Downer theatre prepared 75,000 of 
these calendars which were distrib- 
uted by the 11 houses. The ad at the 
top paid for the calendars. 

tributed. The upper section of the sheet 
carried the shoe man's advertisement, while 
below this was the greeting of the theatre 
and manager as well as a picture of Carl 
Laemmle. Below this was the entire pro- 
gram of the theatre for that week. 

The cost of printing these 75,000 calen- 
dars for the Wilwaukee Threatre Circuit 
was nil. The advertisement on the top paid 
for that. The only thing that the theatres 
had to do was to distribute them, which 
they were glad to do since they carried 
their week's program on the calendar. This 
Milwaukee shoe man has advertised before 
in connection with the Milwaukee Theatre 
Circuit, and has found it to be very profit- 
able. A tieup with a theatre in connection 
with this type of advertising is usually a 
very good medium for a merchant. 



Document Pulls Patrons 

J. M. Franklin, manager of B. F. Keith's 
theatre, Ottawa, Can., caused a holiday scare 
among his friends by sending out formidable- 
looking summons by mail to a long list of 
patrons to attend the special midnight per- 
formance on Friday, December 30, to cele- 
brate the closing of the year. The document 
was drawn up with many legal terms, a red 
seal and court style. 

The first impression, on opening the enve- 
lope, was truly shocking. Then came the 
laugh. The theatre was filled to the doors 
for the cabaret gala. 




When the Princess theatre, San Antonio, Tex., ran "Annie Laurie," the M-G-M 
picture starring Lillian Gish, the name was changed to "Ladies from Hell." Ush- 
ers were dressed in the kilts similar to the ones worn by the soldiers in the pic- 
ture. The costumes and bare knees attracted a great deal of attention, and helped 
the picture to do better than average business. 



Office Houn: 
■ 


^uUttilP ^rpPttngB from 

SINSHEIMER'S 

PEDI-GENIC INSTITUTE 
"The ONLY PLACE OF ITS KIND in the World" 

^RsDCD ya. Hrw WUcoodn Tbutn Bids 6ih ts4 7n*eaiula An. 

Sinsheimer's Shoes Have Brought "Joy" Into Many a Life 






"GIVE YOtJR TROUBLES tUe MERBY HA HA" 

MURRAY THEATRE 


The How SaB <d 
Tbia Tbcitn wiibn 

'™A MERRY 
XMAS and A 

HAPPY 
NEW YEAR 

BEST WISHES 
GENE M- ARNSTEIN 


"OUR JOY WEEK SCREEN OFFERINGS" PROGRAM FOR THE WEEK 


SUN, DEC, 2S 
Jime Marlovre 

"wiid 

Beauty" 


HON.. DSC. Z6 
Barbara Kent 

THESMALL 
BACHEIOR" 

AiMlr* Bsnneer. 
and Ned Spicta 


TUES. & WED. 
DEC. 27-28 
DOLORES 
COSTELLO 

"THE COUiGE 
WIDOW 

Wra. CotUn-. Jr. 
SpccUl XiBu 

Xmas Pinf 


THUR. DEC, 29 

"The 
Cancelled 
Debt" 

With »n AH Sat 
CiM 

New* 


FRI. Md SAT. , 
D£C. 30-31 

DOLORES ' 
COSTELLO 

"OiTSan 
Francisco" 

"A Son of Anais" ' 
Interna tion*l 
News 

2:00 Id S;00 P. Ifl ' 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



67 



NEW PICTURES 



In "New Pictures" the EXHIBITORS HERALD and 
MOVING PICTURE WORLD presents in concise form 
information on current and forthcoming attractions. 

The facts as presented will serve exhibitors in booking 
and in the preparation of their advertising campaigns. 

ALIAS THE LONE WOLF: Columbia mysteiy, with Bert Lytell, Lois Wilson. 
William V. Mong, Ned Sparks, James Mason, Paulette Duval, Ann Brody, and 
Alphonz Ethier. Directed by Edward H. Griffith. Released Aug-ust 23. Length 
5.831- 

TYPE AND THEME: This Lone Wolf, then, is after all a U. S. secret 
service agent. As in the first Lone Wolf tale by Joseph Louis Vance ( in which 
L. W. was kind enough to abjure the secret service), the action is largely on 
shipboard. Eve has jewels ivhich she tvants to smuggle into the United States 
to obtain money to help her brother. A gang and . the Lone Wolf play each 
other for the baubles, with the latter, however, working in the interests of Miss 
Eve Finally in New York the gang seems triumphant, but L. W. turns up as 
Mr. Secret Service, and arrests and sentiment foUoiv. 

BARE KNEES: Gotham comedy-drama, with Billy Duiey, Larry Cook, Jane 
Longworth. Paul Gladden, John Longworth, and others. Directed by Erie C. 
Kenton. Released February 1. Length 6.000. 

TYPE .A.ND THEME: This one has considerable action, therefore much de- 
tail. But briefly the story is this : Billie ( a girl, be assured) visits her married 
sister in a small town and scandalizes the natives with her cigarettes and bare 
knees. Her only kindred spirit is a young man, Larry. It seems the sister- is 
having an "affair," and Billie learns of the contemplated elopement. The hus- 
band, as district attorney, raids the notorious resort which is the rendezvous, 
finding to his surprise his %vife, but also Billie. Then tl9e place catches on 
fire. Larry rescues Billie, the husband promises to be more attentive to his 
ivife, and all's U'ell. 

BEAU SABREUR: Paramount melodrama, with Gary Cooper, Evelyn Brent. 
Noah Beery, William Powell, Roscoe Karns, Mitchell Lewis, Arnold Kent, Raoul 
Panli, Joan Standing, Frank Reicher, and Oscar Smith. Directed by John 
Waters. Released January 7. Length 6,586. 

TYPE AND THEME: Paramount' s sequel to "Beau Geste" and a picture 
of love and ivar in North Africa. Beaujolais (Cooper) is Beau Sabreur, "beau- 
tiful sivordsman," a title earned from his tincle zvhen he subdues Becque. a 
traitor to France. The uncle is anxious to make an empire of the African 
tribes and sends his nepheiv to the Ai-abs to study their ways. There he learns 
of an uprising being fostered by Becque. He hurries to Zaguig, where he meets 
Mary, an American journalist, and in ensuing battles he rescues her from the 
rebels. The Arabs are destroyed and in a dugout Beaujolais kills Becque in a 
duel. There also Mary and he confess their love. 

COME TO MY HOUSE: Fox drama, with Olive Borden, Antonio Moreno, Ben 
Bard, Cornelius Keefe, Doris Lloyd, and Richard Maitland. Directed by Alfred 
E. Green. Released December 25. Length 4,300. 

TYPE AND THEME: This is an adaptation of a Liberty Magazine story 
by Arthur Somers Roche. Olive Borden is Joan, a beautiful, wealthy girl 7cho 
takes great pride in her social ability to do anything she chooses. Renee tvants 
her to marry her brother, Murtagh. One night at a party she meets Bennings, 
ivho, smitten by her, says, "Come to my house tonight." Shortly afterward she 
promises to marry Murtagh, but that night she can not sleep, and finally does 
go to Benning's house. She is seen leaving by Fraylor, who attempts blackmail. 
Joan tells Bennings, who kills Fraylor. At the trial Bennings refuses to expose 
Joan, but she tells the truth, achieving his acquittal. Then she realizes that it 
is Bennings she loves. 

EAST SIDE, WEST SIDE: Fox drama, with George O'Brien, Virginia Valli, J. 
Farrell Maedonald, Dore Davidson, Sonia Nodalsky, June Collyer, John Miltern, 
and others. Directed by Allan Dwan. Released October 9. Length 8,154. 

TYPE AND THEME: Something of an epic, though not quite. It tells 
the story of a lad born the son of a wealthy New Yorker and a servant in his 
home. When he is sixteen, shipwreck in the East River casts him on the shore 
of Manhattan, and from now on the story of Neiv York City is sketched as 
Van Horn fights his ivay up the East Side, to Fifth Avenue, forming friends of 
distinction, going to Columbia University to study engineering, winning the love 
of fair women, but cherishing only that of Becka Lipvitch, whom he learned to 
love in his East Side days. 

FINNEGAN'S BALL: First Division comedy-drama, with Charley McHugh, Ag- 
gie Herring, Blanche Mehaffiey, Mack Swain, CuUen Landis, Westcott J. Clarke 
Kewpie Morgan, and D.^nny Finnegan. Directed by James P. Hogan. Re- 
leased September 15. Length 6,750. 

TYPE AND THEME: It's Irish, even to the director, and was adapted 
from the trouping stage play of the same title. The Finnegans in Ireland join 
the Flannigans in America, and once more Molly a,nd Jimmy are united. Fights 
folloiv the reunion, however, and then tvhen Finnegan becomes heir to an es- 
state, his family S7iubs the Flannigans. But the Finnegans prove the ivrong 
heirs, where\ipon the Flann'gans forgive them, while Molly and Jimmy seal tlit 
peace treaty by naming the date of their ivedding. 

GET yOUR MAN: Paramount comedy-drama, with Clara Bow, Charles Rogers, 
Josef Swickard, Josephine Dunn, Harvey Clarke, and Frances Raymond. Di- 
rected by Dorothy Arzner. Released December 10. Length 5,889. 

TYPE AND THEME: Nancy (Miss Bozu) is less discreet than determined 
to get her man. In Paris she meets Robert, a young Frenchman, who had been 
engaged (in a prologue) when a child. Meeting again in a wax-works museum. 
Nancy and Robert are locked in for the night. The next morning they are in 
love, but Robert tells of the impending ivedding. Contriving a fake accident 
near Robert's home, Nancy soon thereafter has won the love of Robert's pros- 
pective fathcr-in-law, who, at her request, breaks the engagement. Robert, how- 
ever, is estranged by her conduct vjith Simone's papa. But she gets him into 
her room and into her arms just as Simonc, her papa and Robert's papa entei . 
They demand the marriage of Nancy and Robert to save the family nanu\ Sn 
Nancy gets her man — but how ! 

LOVE: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer drama, with John Gilbert, Greta Garbo, Georjie 



Fawcett, Emily Fitzroy, Brandon Hurst, and Philippe De Lacy. Directed by 
Edmund Goulding. Released January 2. Length 7,365. 

TYPE AND THEME: Adapted from Lyof Tolstoi's celebrated novel, "Anna 
Karenina," this is the story of a ivoman's two loves, one for her child, the 
other for a man not her husband, and being faithfully Russian, it ends unhap- 
pily. Anna, ivife of the cabinet minister, Karenin, is taken to an inn by Cap- 
tain Vronsky, who encounters her sleigh wrecked in the snow. She repulses 
him that night but later becomes his mistress. Her only other love is that for 
her child. Karenin discovers her duplicity when an accident to Vronsky com- 
mands her anxiety and he forbids her his home and their child. Then Anna 
learns that Vronsky, because of her, is to be discharged from his regiment. But 
his discharge is rescinded, Anna having promised the Grand Duke — herself. 

PEAKS OF DESTINY: Paramount-UFA drama, with Louis Trenker, Leni Rief- 
enstahl, Erents Petersen, and Frieda Richard. Directed by Arnold Fanek. Re- 
leased January 28. Lenth _ 

TYPE AND THEME: Made in Germany, this one tells the story of the love 
of two men for one tvonian high in the Alps. VigO' and Diotima love each 
other, but Diotima is mildly intrigued by the youthful friend of Vigo. When 
she is enthusiastically congratulating him for his success in a skiing contest, 
Vigo sees and is made envious. He asks his friend to climb a dangerous peak, 
but when the friend's life depends on his strength, he suffers to save him. 
Through Diotima they are rescued — and Vigo is assured of her undying love. 

POLLY OF THE MOVIES: First Division comedy-drama, with Gertrude Short, 
Jason Robards, Mary Foy, Corliss Palmer, Stuart Holmes. Jack Richardson, 
and Rose Dione. Directed by Scott Pembroke. Released November 1. Length 
6,900. 

I'YPE AND THEME: Polly (Miss Short) has dreams of being a great ac- 
tress. She's only a maid in a rooming house, but a beauty contest seems to be 
her big chance. To insure success, she sends in a picture of another girl who 
really is beautiful, but the subterfuge is discovered. Hoivever, the contest man 
does take her to Hollywood, followed by Angics, who loves her. Angus puts 
up the money enabling two jake producers to make a drama. It turns out to 
be a comedy — and how! Polly is hurt, but a real producer follows Angus to 
the hospital and buys the picture. Angus and Polly leave for Hohokus, rich and 
happy. 

QUALITY STREET: Metro-Gold wyn-Mayer (Cosmopolitan) comedy-drama, with 
Marion Davies, Conrad Nagel, Helen Jerome Eddy, Flora Finch, Margaret 
Seddon, Marcell Corday, and Kate Price. Directed by Sydney Franklin. Re- 
leased January 28. Length 7,627. 

TYPE AND TFIEME: The noted James M. Barrie wrote this as a stage 
comedy, ivhich was produced by Charles Frohman in 1901. Thus it comes of 
good family and perhaps receives neiv blood from the popular Marion Davies. 
But in 1928 the story is not new. As pretty Phoebe (in England), Miss Davies 
is in love with Dr. Valentine Brown, from whom the expected proposal does 
not come, for. the doctor enlists for the Napoleonic ivars. When he returns, 
Phoebe has turned spinster and he withholds his proposal once more. Angry, 
Phoebe dolls up and represents herself as her niece. Captain Brown is quickly 
captured. 

RUSH HOUR, THE : Pathe light comedy with Marie Prevost, Harrison Ford, 
Seena Owen, David Butler and Ward Crane. Directed by E. Mason Hopper. 
Length 5880. Released December 12. 

TYPE AND THEME: Margie Dolan is a steamship ticket clerk who longs 
to travel. She has a sweetheart and proposes a Niagara Falls trip for a 
honeymoon, but he is shocked at such extravagance. She delivers a ticket 
aboard ship and stows away. She is employed by a couple as a "companion" 
but they plan to use her in their nefarious scheme of robbing the millionaire 
Finch. Margie leads a hectic life and becomes sadly and excitingly implicated 
in their plan, which leads to a duel between her and her mistress. Dan, her 
sweetheart, arrives in time and consents to that trip to the Falls. 

STAGE KISSES: Columbia drama, with Kenneth Harlan, Helene Chadwick, John 
Patrick, Phillips Smalley, Ethel Wales, and Frances Raymond. Directed by 
Albert Kelly. Released November 2. Length 5,435. 

TYPE AND THEME: Hoiv spunk and charm may make a stage girl ac- 
ceptable to her husband's snobbish family. Donald is disoivned when he marries 
Fay, and they must struggle against poverty. Fay, wishing to get another 
dancing contract, seeks help from her former partner and sioeetheart, Keith. 
Keith loves her and one night ivhile Donald is at his club, he breaks into her 
boudoir, just as Donald comes home. To demonstrate her innocence. Fay places 
Donald's uncle in a position corresponding to hers, concealing herself in his 
house and compromising him before his ivife. The device works. She and 
Donald, who also adduces a confession from Keith, are taken into the family 
circle. 

STRANDED: Sterling drama, with Shirley Mason, William Collier, Jr., John 
Miljan, Florence Turner, Gale Henry, Shannon Day, Lucy Beaumont, Rose 

Gore. Directed by Phil Rosen. Released August 15. Length 

TYPE AND THEME: Anita Loos wrote this one, which tells the story of 
a girl "crazy to get into the movies." Her hard-working mother gives her the 
money to take her to Hollyivood, where her only good luck is to meet a 
hardy old trouper, Lucille. Joining other picture-mad girls on a party, she 
meets Payne, a ivealthy profligate. When she does get a chance to act, she fails 
miserably. Then a 'etter comes telling her that money is needed for an operation 
on her mother. This is Payne's chance and he takes it. But Lucille had sent 
for Sally's sweetheart, ivho arrives in time to put on a finish fight with Payne 
and carry Sally back to the old home town. 

TELL IT TO SWEENEY: Paramount full-length comedy, with Chester Conklin, 
George Bancroft, Jack Luden, Doris Hill. Franklin Bond and William H. 
Tooker. Directed by Gregory- La Cava. Released September 24. Length 6,006. 

TYPE AND THEME : Though there's a yarn, this one's to laugh at because 
of Bancroft and Conklin and the "gag-man." The co-stars are engineers and 
friendly enemies. Conklin has a daughter loved by the son of the railroad 
president, but Bancroft likes her too, and from this follows comedy built around 
a contest of strength between the son and the engineer. Tlie contest never 
occurs, but the eflopement of girl and president's son does, resiilting in a 
wild, slap-stick and futile chase with an irate father down the tracks to the 
county seat, where Bancroft realises that he never could have won the gal 
anyway. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



PRESS SHEETS 



ADVENTURER, THE (M-G-M) : Try a correct 
contest for a "still" that shows Dorothy Sebastian 
and Tim McCoy together, giving free tickets to 
those who guess nearest what they are saying. The 
locale of the film is in South America, therefore 
obtain tieupe with merchants on Spanish shawls, 
earrings, combs, laces, dresses, jewelry, etc. If pos- 
sible get a radio tieup for the picture, telling what 
other productions Tim McCoy has appeared in, and 
giving a synopsis of the story of "The Adventurer." 
Run a story contest on "What is the most exciting 
moment in 'The Adventurer'?" or an identification 
contest, to see who knows the most M-G-M stars, 
and what pictures they have played in. A tango 
would make an appropriate presentation feature to 
be used before each performance. 

ADVENTURE MAD (Paramount) : A window 
contest and a lobby stunt, although they seem to 
have no direct relation to the film, are suggested 
for exploiting this production. The window con- 
test is described this way ; display a large clock in 
one of the town's leading show windows a few days 
before the film is to be run, with copy informing 
the public that the clock will be started at a certain 
time, and that prizes will be given to those who 
estimate nearest the time that it vpill stop. Make 
it understood that a person is not obliged to buy 
anything in order to give an estimate. For the lobby 
stunt, obtain a small safe and announce that the 
person who can discover the combination and can 
open the safe without using violence will be given 
the prizes that are within it. 

FEARLESS RIDER, THE (Universal): Place the 
stills from this film in the window of some sporting 
goods store and announce a contest to see who can 
write a synopsis of the story from the material given 
in these photographs. The prizes need not be at all 
expensive, and there is sure to be interest aroused. 
For the newspapers try to have a layout made of 
some of the famous fearless riders of United Sta/tes 
history, such as Roosevelt, Buffalo Bill, Sherman and 
Annie Oakley, with a story on "The Most Fearless 
Rider in U. S. History." 

HERO FOR THE NIGHT, A (Universal): As 
aviation is the key-note of this farce comedy, which 
is built around a non-stop flight from the United 
States to Russia, use all effort to tieup with the 
local aviation field, or with any aviators that are in 
your locality in pulling off some kind of a race or 
contest. Perhaps you could get them to distribute 
heralds by dropping them from their planes. If your 
town hasn't any aiiTX>rt, show the need for one, and 
launch a drive for the building of such a community 
asset. About two weeks in advance of your play 
date get the newspapers to break the announcement 
of a contest for "A Search for the Hero of the Night 
in Blankville." Readers will be invited to send In 
accounts of various night-time adventures. Be siire 
to get in humorous ones such as the story about the 
fellow who has to walk the floor with the baby all 
night ; and the man who tried to get into the wrong 
house and was nabbed as a burglar, etc. 

IF I WERE SINGLE (Warner) : Your tieup line 
for jewelers, florists, candy shops, lingerie stores, etc., 
can read, "Don't let your wife whisper to herself 

'If I Were Single!' like May Avoy does at the 

theatre in the Warner Bros, picture 'If I Were 
Single'." Run a hundred word essay contest on 
"How to Hold Your Husband," or if you want to 
touch a lighter vein give a prize for the best daily 
matrimonial joke. Install a radio amplifier in your 
lobby with a microphone attached inside the theatre 
to carry the laughs from the audience to the side- 
walk. This is a good suggestion and the results 
should be in exact proportion to the actual worth of 
the film. 

LET 'ER GO GALLEGHER (Pathe) : This is from 
the story written by the famous Richard Harding 
Davis, and is about a newspaper office boy who solves 
a baffling mystery. Try to interest the boys from the 
press and if possible get an office boy to review the 
picture. Have an artist draw the figure of a man's 
hand, one finger of which is missing, and use this 
copy to describe it, "This missing finger was re- 
sponsible for bringing a murderer to justice in 'Let 

'er Go Gallegher' which will be shown at the. „ 

theatre -...(dates)." Offer free tickets to all 

boys whose names are Gallegher, and tieup with the 
book stores and the library on the works of Richard 
Harding Davis. 

UTTLE BUCKAROO, THE (FED): The ideas 
expressed in this press sheet for the betterment of 
motion picture entertainment, should be interpreted 
by exhibitors as being the real goods. Exploitation 
suggestions are: print a typed letter from Buzz Bar- 
ton, who is the boy star in this film, addressed to 
your patrons. The copy for this letter reads well, 
and if your audiences are satisfied with this produc- 
tion they should certainly come back for moie. A 

letter fi-om the manager of the theatre is also printed 



to be used as a house letter, and a small card, to be 
handed to adult patrons, which reads "As a father or 
mother do you think the Buzz Barton pictures are 

the type which should be shown to boys? Yes 

No " For the lobby or front of the theatre 

get an old dilapidated trunk, bind it with rope and 
place this copy over it on a large card, "What's in 
this ? Only the bandits know ! See Buzz Barton in 
The Little Buckaroo, now playing here, for the solu- 
tion." 

RIDING RENEGADE, THE (F B. O) : If there are 
any Indians in your town invite some of them to a 
particular perfoi-mance and then have a reporter 
interview them on what they thought of the show, 
etc. Perhaps if you found some Red Men who had 
never seen a motion picture before, you could get 
a good story from them. Very catchy teasers with 
these titles are printed, "REWARD"— "DISOWNED" 




FIRST NATIONAL STUDIOS 
BURBANK, CALIFORNIA 

WHERE DID PROF. ERSKINE 
GET ALL HIS DOPE ABOUT 
HELEN'S PRIVATE LIFE STOP 
CAN'T UNDERSTAND WHY 1 
MISSEO ALL OF HER SECHET 
LOVE AFFAIRS STOP I MUST 
HAVE BEEN BLIND. 

HOMER 




BLANK THEATRE 
BLANKVILLE 

I WANT TO RETRACT WHAT I 
WROTE ABOUT HELEN'S FACE 
LAUNCHING A THOUSAND 

SHIPS STOP afte;^ seeing 

YOUR MOVIE VERSION OF HER 
PRIVATE LIFE AM CONVINCED 
SHE COULD OUTSPEED A 
THOUSAND AIRPLANES 

KIT MARLOWE 





WESTER UNION 



FIRST NATIONAL STUDIOS 
BURBANK, CALIFORNIA 

SAY! CAN'T A GIRL KEEP HER 
LOVE SECRETS ANY MORE 
STOP I WOULDN'T MIND YOUTl 
SCREENING THE STORY OF MY 
LIFE IF YOU WOULD HAVE 
ONLY OMITTED MY PRIVATE 
LOVE AFFAIRS STOP NOW 
EVERYBODY WILL KNOW THE 
SECRETS I HAVE BEEN KEEP- 
ING FOR 2700 YEARS 

HELEN OF TROY 



Suggested telegrams to be used in newspa- 
per ads in throw-aways, teasers, tack 
cards, lobby displays, house letters, or 
window displays, for the First National 
special, "The Private Life of Helen of 
Troy," with Maria Corda, from the best- 
seller of the same name, written by John 
Erskine. 



—"ESCAPED"— "CAPTURED," and the last ad 
reads, "Jailed by his own father. Accused as a 

bandit because. ," etc. How about giving your 

patrons a small identification card suitable to put 

into a wallet with this copy, "My name is 

my address is . In case of accident notify 

" On the other side you could have at- 
tractively printed copy describing your house, the 
type of pictures you show, and your policies. 

SECRET HOUR, THE (Paramount) : The title 
suggests a tieup with jewelry stores or any place sell- 
ing clocks, using such copy as this : "No Secret 
Hour here. Pola Negri will tell you all about it 

next week at the theatre." Other copy cani 

read, "Why keep good things secret? We don't, 
neitlier does Pola Negri in The Secret Hour, playing 

at the _ theatre next week." The story is a 

tale of the orange groves and a tieup with a fruit 
dealer would be rather novel. Cut out the outline of 
a_ clock with the hands pointing to twelve, work the 
title on the face, and place this in a conspicuous 
place, playing it up in as many ways as possible. 

SERENADE (Paramount) : Do any of your hotels 
or restaiu-ants employ an orchestra? If so, each eve- 
ning in the week preceding the showing of the pic^ 
ture, have a violinist "serenade" some good looking 
girl customer. Have this done subtly so that every 
one will turn around and wonder what's going on. 
At the end of the piece, a card should be displayed 
with the copy, "You have just witnessed a scene from 
Adolphe Menjou's Paramount picture 'Serenade.' 

Why not see the real thing? It will be at the.... 

theatre next week. Don't miss it." Have the organ- 
ist or musical director play all the well-known sere- 
nades during the time the film is being shown. Stage 
an "Old Fiddlers Contest" and offer prizes for the 
best interpretation of the serenade you select. Per- 
haps the confectionery and drug stores will vary their 
soda fountain menu by selling a special "Serenade"' 
sundae. 

SWIFT SHADOW, THE (F B O) : For stores sell- 
ing Glover's Dog Remedies use this copy, "Give them 
all they deserve. Your dog deserves the best of care 
and attention. Ranger, one of the world's great dogs 
is given all of Glover's Renowned Remedies. See this 
glorious dog in 'The Swift Shadow,' now playing at 

the. _ theatre." In the stoi-y the dog is forced 

to choose between two masters. Get patrons to write- 
opinion of whether Ranger decided on the right one. 
Have selected the best, or the champion police dog 
of the city, and borrow it during the run of the pic- 
ture. Place the dog in an advantageous position in 
the lobby or in front of the house, with this copy,. 

"The town's champion police dog _ (Name 

and owner.) Compare him with the mighty canine 
star. Ranger, in 'The Swift Shadow.' now playing 
here." 

BEAU SABREUR (Paramount) : This is the sequel 
to Beau Geste, which won the Pliotoplay Medal for 
being the best picture of the year. Beau Sabreur 
was wi-itten by the same author, and produced by the 
same company. Tieup with the book stores, and tell 
the town about this picture. Decorate the lobby with 
swords, water bags, Arab attire and tents, and run a 
special "Beau" night when all patrons who come to- 
gether in couples, that is, a boy and a girl, or man 
and woman, will be admitted at a reduced rate. Run 
teasers, and give the story as much advertising as 
you can afford. It pays. For the larger houses this 
film suggests some wonderful stage presentations. 

HER SUMMER HERO (F B O) : Sponsor a swim- 
ming contest, and be sure to run a herald telling of 
the famous swimming stars that are appearing in this 
production. If possible run a "handsomest man con- 
test," and get the interest of all the students, the 
story is the type that should appeal to them. If there 
are any local swimming heroes get them in on this 
by running their pictures in the paper, printing de- 
tailed stories of their rescues, history, etc., and by 
having them appear at each perfonnance. All police 
and firemen heroes can be admitted free, and their 
names printed in the papers. A display of their 
medals in the best store window in town or in front 
of your theatre, will attract everyone's attention. 

CASEY JONES (Rayart) : A lobby ballyhoo might 
be used in this way : Obtain the phonograph record 
of the song, "Casey Jones," and run this on a 
machine where passers-by can hear it. A musical 
setting and a reproduction of the song sheet is 
printed in this press book. Tieup with all toy stores 
handling toy engines, getting them, if possible, to- 
have a window display showing a train mnning 
around a track with the proper stills from the picture 
placed in the center. Tieup with music stores, with 
radio broadcasting stations, railroad associations or 
unions, etc. If possible try to get your posters on 
street cars and railroad trains. Don't overlook rail- 
road benefit funds, if yours is a railroad town, and 
you find such methods profitable. 



QUICK REFERENCE PICTURE CHART 



Incorporated in this department of Moving Picture World is the Exhibitors Herald department, 

"Available Attractions." 



F— Farce 

M — Melodrama 

W — Western 



The key to abbreviations used in denoting the type of 
picture: 
C — Comedy 
D — Drama 
R — Romance 

My — Mystery 

Where the picture is a comedy-drama, comedy melo- 
drama, etc., there is a combination of these abbreviations. 
Stars denote reissues. 

The dates published under the "Review" column are 
those of the issues of Moving Picture World in v^hich the 
pictures were reviewed. 

The dates prior to January 7 published under the "New 
Pictures" column are those of the issues of EXHIBIT- 
ORS HERALD in which "New Pictures" information was 
printed. The January 7 and subsequent dates are those of 
the issues of EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING 
PICTURE WORLD in which this information will be 
printed. 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures 



Reviews 



Columbia 



1927 



1927 



Aug. 22 Oct. 1 

.Aug. 10 ..-Dec. 3 ..July 23 



Alias the Lone 

Wolf (D) Lytell-Wilson 5831. 

Blood Ship, The (M) Bosworth-Logan 6843 

By Whose Hand? 

(MyD) „ Cortez-Gilbert 5432 Sept. 15 

College Hero, The (CD)..Agnew-Garon 5628 Oct. 9 

Isle of Forgotten 

Women (D) Tearle-D. Sebastian.... 5645 Sept. 27....Dec. 3 

Lone Wolf Returns (M).. Lytell-Wilson 5750 .July 31 

Opening Night, The (D)..Wind6or-J. Bowers .... 5524 Nov. 14 

Sally in Our Alley (M) .._ Mason-Allen 5892 Sept. 3 

Pleasure Before Business 

(F) „ Davidson 5569 , May 14 

Screen Snapshots...- 1000 Aug. 28 

Stage Kisses (D) Harlan-Chadwick 5435 Nov. 2 

Stolen Pleasures (CD)....Revier 5054 

Sweet Rosie O'Grady 

(CD) _ Ma£on -...6108 ~ Oct. 2 

Tigress, The (M) _ Holt-Revier -...5357 Oct. 21 

Wandering Girls (CD)....Revier-Agnew 5426 

Warning, The (M) Holt-Revier _ 5791 Nov. 26 ....Dec. 3 



Cranfield & Clarke, Inc. 



1927 



1927 



Real Charleston L^esson Novelty 2000 Apr. 24 

Angelns, The (D) 2000 May 15 

Wooden Shoes International May 8 



Emblem Films 

.1927 

Husbands or Lovers _...Jannings 6250 .. 



1927 

..Dec. 3 



1927 



F B O 

1927 

Aflame in the Sky (M)....Luden-Lynn Dec. 18 Dec. 10 

Bandit's Son, The (W).. Bob Steele 4765 Nov. 20....Dec. 10 

Breed of Courage (D) Ranger 4910 Aug. 7 

Boy Rider, The (W) Buzz Barton 4858 Oct. 23 Dec. 3 Oct. 8 

Cherokee Kid, The (W)....Tyler- Lynn _...4837 Oct. 30 Nov. 26 

Clancy's Kosher Wed- 
ding (CD) _ George Sidney 5701 Sept. 17 Sept. 10 

Coward, The (D) Warner Baxter _.5093 Aug. 21 Sept. 10 

Desert Pirate (W) Tom Tyler 4754 Dec. 25 Dec. 24 

Don Mike (RD) _ Fred Thomson 5723 ...„ Mar. 5 

Flying U Ranch, 

The (W) Tom Tyler _ 4913 Sept. 4 

Gambler's Game, 

The (W) Tom Tyler - Oct. 30 

Gingham Girl, The (C)....Lois Wilson 6300 Oct. 2 Nov. 26 July 30 

Great Mail Robbery, 

The (M) Von Eltz-Nelson 6507 Aug. 15 July 2 

Harvester, The (D) Orville Caldwell 7014 Nov. 23 ....Nov. 19... .Nov. 19 

Hook and Ladder 

No. 9 (D) Ed Hearne 5240 Nov. 13 Dec. 3 Nov. 26 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures Reviews 



In a Moment of Temp- 
tation (M) _ Kit Guard , 5665 Sept. 18 Dec. 10 

Jake the Plumber (C) Jesse De Vorska 5186 Oct. 16 Dec 3 

Judgment of the 

Hills (D) Darro-Valli 6481 Nov. 6 Nov. 12....Aug. 20 

Legionnaires in 

Paris (C) _ Gooke-Guard _ Dec. 27...„.Dec. 10 

Lightning Lariats (W).... Tyler 4536 _ Jan. 22 

Magic Garden (D)..._ 6807 Feb. 26 

Mojave Kid, The (W) Bob Steele „.4924 Sept. 25 Aug. 6 

Moon of Israel (D) Maria Gorda -.6680 July 9 

Mother (D) _ Belle Bennett 6885 _ Mar. 19 

Moulders of Men (M) Frankie Darro 6412 Apr. 9 

Naughty Nannette (CD). .Viola Dana 4949 May 9 

Not for Publication (M)..Ralph Ince 6140 Aug. 31 July 23 

Outlaw Dog (M) Ranger 4721 _ Apr. 23 

Racing Romeo (D) Ked Grange Dec. 10 

Ranger of the 

North (D) Ranger _...4941 Oct. 9 Dec. 3 

Shanghaied (M) Ralph Ince 6004 Oct. 19 Dec. 3 Aug. 20 

Silver Comes Thru Thomson 5476 May 28 

Slingshot Kid, The (M)....Buzz Barton 4886 Dec. 4 Dec. 10 

Sonora Kid (W) Tyler 4565 _ Mar. 5 

South Sea Love (D) Patsy Miller 6388 Dec. 10 Nov. 12 

Swift Shadow, The (D).... Ranger — 4892 Dec. 11 Dec. 10 

Tarzan and the Golden 

Lion A Jungle Fantasy 5807 Apr. 2 

When the Law Rides 

(W) Tyler-Darro — Dec. 24 

1928 1928 
Chicago After Midnight 

(M) Inoe-Mendez - Mar. 4 

Coney Island (D) Lois Wilson Jan. 13 Dec. 17 

Dead Man's Curve (D).... Fairbanks, Jr. 5511 Jan. 15 Dec. 17 

Driftin' Sands (W) Bob Steele ._ 4770 Jan. 1 Dec. 17 

Little Mickey Grogan 

(D) _...Frankie Darro 6515 Jan. 30 Dec. 17 

Wizard of the Saddle 

(W) Buzz Barton Jan. 22 - Dec. 24 



Excellent 



1927 

Back to Liberty , 

Bowery Cinderella (M).... 

Broadway Madness. 

Nest, The (D) _. 

Satan and the Woman.... 

Stronger Will, The 

Your Wife and Mine (F). 



Walsh-Breese 5980 Nov. 10 

O-Malley-Huletto 6900 Nov. 1 ... 

De La Motte-Keith....6300 Oct. 1 

Frederick-Herbert ....7393 Aug. 1 

Windeor-C. Keefe 6900 Dee. 20 

Percy Marmont 

Phyllis Haver 5867 Sent. 1 



1927 

.Nov. 26 



First National 



.6300 
.6333.. 



1927 

April 2 

Oct. 9 Nov. 19 Oct. 22 



-6422 Mar. 5 



1927 

All Aboard (C) J. Hines 

American Beauty (D) Billie Dove 

An Affair of the 

Follies (D) All-star 

Breakfast at Sunrise 

(CD) C. Talmadge 6042 Oct. 23 Nov. 12....Nov. 26 

Broadway Nights (C) L. Wilson 6765 May 21 

Canulle (D) Norma Talmadge 8692 Sept. 4 May 2 

Chaser, The (C) Harry Langdon Feb. 12 

Convoy (D) Sherman-Mackaill ....7724 _ May 21 

Crystal Cup, The (D) Mackaill-Mulhall 6380 Oct. 16 Nov. 12. Oct. 29 

Dance Magic (M) Lyon-Starke 6585 Aug. 13 

Drop Kick, The (D) „.BarthIemess 6802 Sept. 25 

Easy Pickings (MyM) A. Q. Nilsson —.5400 Feb. 26 

Framed (M) Sills 5282 July 9 

Gorilla, The (My) Murray-Kelsey 7133 Nov. 13 ....Nov. 26.. ..Nov. 26 

Gun Gospel (W) Ken Maynard 6288 Nov. 6 Dec. 17 

High Hat (CD) Lyon 6161 Mar. 19 

Her Wild Oat (CD) Colleen Moore 6118 Dec. 25 Dec. 3 

Home Made (C) Johnny Hines 6524 Nov. 20 ....Nov. 26 Oct. 29 

Life of Riley (C) Murray-Sidney 6712 Sept. 18-- Oct. 1 

Lady in Ermine (D) C. Griffith 6400 Jan. 8 

Lonesome Ladies (CD)....Nilsson-Stone 5718 Sept. 24 

Long Pants (C) Langdon _ 5550 Apr. 9 

Lost at the Front Sidney-Murray 5559 _ June 25 

Love Mart, The Billie Dove 7388 Dec. 18 

(Previous title: Louisiana) 

Lunatic at Large (F) L. Brro! 5321 _ Feb. 5 

Man Crazy Mackaill-Mulhall 5542 Nov. 27 Nov. 26 

Masked Woman (D) Nilsson-Blinn 5442 _ Jan. 22 

McFadden's Flats (C) Murray-Conklin 7845 Feb. 12 

Naughty But Nice (C)-.C. Moore 6520 July 16 

Notorious Lady, 

The (D) Stone 6040 May 14 

No Place to Go (CD) Hughes-Astor 6431......0ct. 30 Nov. 12 Dec. 10 

Orchids and Ermine 

(CD) C. Moore 6734 _ Apr. 9 

Patent Leather Kid (M)..BartheIme6S _ 11,412 Aug. 20 



70 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD - January 7, 1928 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures Reviews 



Perfect Sap (C) 

Poor Nut (C) 

Prince of Head Waiters 

(D) -.. 

Red Raiders, The (W).... 
Rose of the Golden 

West (D) 

Sea Tiger (D) 

See You in Jail (FC)...„. 
Smile, Brother, Smile .... 

(CD) 

Stolen Bride (M) 

Sunset Derby (M) 

Tender Hour (D) 

Tesas Steer, A (CD) 

Three Honrs (MyD) _ 

Three's a Crowd (C) 

Twinkletoes (D) 

Valley of the Giants 

(D) 

Venus of Venice (C) 

White PanU Willie <C) 



Lyon-Starke 5620 Jan. 22 

Mulhall 6897 _ Sept. 10 

Stone 6400 July 23 

Ken Maynard 6214 Sept. 4 Oct. 15 

Mary Astor 6477 Oct. 2 Nov. 19 Oct. 8 

Sills 5606 - _ May 14 

Mulhall 5800 _ Apr. 23 

Mulhall-Mackaill . 6669. Sept. 11 .Sept. 17 

Dovc-Hughes 7179 ....Sept. 3 

Astor-ColUer 5000 „ ~ July 2 

Dave-Lyon 6631 „ _ May 28 

Will Rogers 7419 Dec. 4 Dec. 3 

C. Griffith 5760 Apr. 16 

Langdon 5668 Oct. 8 

G. Moore 7833 „.Jan. 1 

Milton Sills Dec. 11 Dec. 24 Dec. 3 

C. Talmadge 6300 May 7 

Hines 6350 Aug. 6 



1928 

French Dressing (D) Lois Wilson .... 

Private Life of Helen of 

Troy, The (CD) Maria Corda .. 

Noose, The (D) „. Barthelmess 

Sailors' Wives (CD) Hughes-Astor 

Shepherd of the Hills 

(D) _ Francis-O'Day 



1928 

6344 Jan. 15 Dec. 10 Dec. 17 

7694..._.Jan. 8 Dec. 24 

-.'...Jan. 29 Dec. 10 

_ Jan. 22 Dec. 24 



.8188 Jan. 1 Dec. 3 



First Division 



1927 



...Oct. 1 

„.Sept. 15 



1927 
Aug. 20 



..Oct. 15 



Death VaUey (W) „OarrolI Nye 5900. 

Finnegan's Ball (C) Mack Swain 6750. 

Ladies at Ease (CD) Garon-Short 6293. 

Love in a Cottage Betty Compson Dec. 1 

Merry Wives of Windsor.. Pauline Garon „.Dec. 15 

Polly of the Movies Gertrude Short 6900 Nov. 1 

Ragtime (D) _...De La Motta 6700 .Sept. l.._..Nov. 26 Sept. 3 

Return of Boston 

Blackie (D) Glenn-Palmer . 5700 Aug. 1 

Say It With Diamonds.... Betty Compson. . — 5900 Aug. 15 

Temptations of a Shop 

Girl Betty Clompsou Oct. 15 



Fox 



1927 



1927 



Ankles Preferred (CD).... Bellamy 5498 _ Mach 12 

Arizona Wildcat, 

The (W) Tom Mix „ _ 4665 JSTov. 20 Nov. 19 

Auctioneer, The Sidney _...5500 Eeb. 5 

Blackjack (W) Buck Jones 4777 Sept. 25 

Blood Will Tell (W) Buck Jones 4556 Nov. 13 Nov. 12 

Broncho Twister (W) Mix 5425 ._ April 2 

Cameo Kirby (D) John Gilbert 6078 Aug. 28 

Chain Lightning (W) Buck Jones 5333 Aug. 14 

Circus Ace, The Mix 4810 June 18 

Cradle Snatchers (FC)....razenda 6381 _ June 4 

Come to My House 

(CD) „. Olive Borden ...4300 Dec. 25 

Desert Valley (W) Jones _ 4731 Jan. 8 

East Side, West 

Side (D) O'Brien-Valli 8154. Oct. 9..._ Oct. 22 

Gay Retreat, The (C) Cohen-McNamara 5524 Sept. 25 Oct. 1 

(Jood as Gold (W) Jones _ 4545 June 11 

Heart of Salome (MyR)..Rubens _ 5617 _ May 9 

High School Hero (C)......Phipps-Stuart _5515 Oct. 16...- Oct. 29 

Hills of Peril (W) _ Jones _ 4983 May 14 

Honor First (D) John Gilbert 4851 Sept. 18 

Is Zat So? (CD) -...O'Brien-Lowe _...6940 _ May 21 

Joy Girl, The (CD) ....Olive Borden 6162 Sept. 18 — . Sept. 24 

Ladies Must Dress (CD).. Virginia Valli 5599 Nov. 20 ....Nov. 19 Dec. 17 

Last Trail (W) Mix ....5190 _ Feb. 5 

Love Makes 'Em 

Wild (D) Harron 8538 - Oct. 1 

Loves of Carmen (D) McLaglen-Del Rio ....8538 Sept. 4 Oct. 8 

Madame Wants No 

Children Corda .5415 _ Apr. 16 

Marriage (D) Valli „ 5440 Feb. 26 

Monkey Talks (D) Lerner _ 5500 . Mar. 5 

Music Master (D) A. B. Francis ....7734 - Jan. 22 

One Increasing Purpose 

(D) Lowe 7677 Jan. 15 

Outlaws of Red River 

(W) Mix „ 5327 Apr. 23 

Paid to Love (D) O'Bvien-Valli 6898 Aug. 4 Aug. 6 

Pajamas (CD) Borden-Gray 5876 Oct. 23 Dec. 10 

Publicity Madness (CD).. Moran-Lowe 5893 Oct. 2 

Rich But Honest (CD).... Beebe 5480 June 4 

Secret Studio, The (CD).. Borden 5870 June 25 

Seventh Heaven (R) Farrell-Gaynor 10726. ...Oct. 30 May 28 

Shame (M) John Gilbert 5467 Nov. 27 Nov. 26 

Silk Legs (CD) Madge Ballamy 5446 Dec. 18 

Silver Valley (W) Tom Mix 5009 Oct. 2 Dec. 17 Oct. 29 

Singed (D) Baxter-Sweet 5792 Aug. 21 July 16 

Slaves of Beauty , (D) Herbert-Tell 5412 June 11 

Stage Madness (D) Valli 5620 Jan. 29 

St. Elmo (M) .Tohn Gilbert 4943 Oct. 9 

Summer Bachelors (CD).. Bellamy _ 6782 Jan. 1 

Sunrise (D) O'Bricn-Gaynor 10000 ^'^^■J 

Tumbling River (W) Tom Mix-Dawn 4075 Aug. 21 Aug. 27 

Truxlon King 4299 Oct. 30 

Two Girls Wanted (CD)..Janet Gaynor 6293 Sept. 11 

Upstream (D) Foxe 5510 _ Feb. 12 

Very Confidential (CD) Madge Bellamy 5620 Nov. 6 Nov. 12 

War Horse (W) Jones 4953 Feb. 19 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures Reviews 



What Price Glory (CD)..McLaglen-Lowe 11109....Aug. 28 

Whispering Sage (W) Jones -.4783 

Wizard, The (MyD) Lowe-Hyams 5629 Dec. 11... 

Wolf Fangs (D) Thunder (Dog) 5531 Nov. 27 



Apr. 9 
. Dec. 3 



1928 

Branded Sombrero, 

The (W) Buck Jones 4612 Jan. 8 

$5,000 Reward (W) Tom Mix 5000 Jan. 15.. 

Girl in Every Port, A 

(CD) _ Victor McLaglen Jan. 29 

Holiday Lane _ Jan. 22 

Sharp Shooters O'Brien-Moran - Jan. 15 

Woman Wise _ Eussell-CoUyer 5050 Jan. 8 



Gotham 



1928 



1927 



1927 

Blondes by Choice (C)....Claire Windsor 6987 Oct. 1 

Cheer Leader, The (CD)..Graves-01mstead 5800 Nov. 15 

'Frisco Nights (D) Percy Marmont 6200 Deo. 1 Dec. 10 

Final Extra (M) De La Motta 6000 - Feb. 19 

Girl from Rio, The (D).Garmel Myers 5950 Sept. 1 Nov. 26...Sept. 24 

Heroes of the Night (M).. Landis-Nixon 6500 — Feb. 5 

Rose of Kildare, 

The (D) Helene Chadwick 6700...„.Aug. 15 .—Nov. 19 

Satin Woman, The (D).„.Mrs. Wallace Reid....6750 Aug. 1 Nov. 19. ...Aug. 13 



1928 

Bare Knees (D) Mae Busch 6000 Feb. 1 

United States Smith(D).. AU-Star Cast 7000 Jan. 1 



1928 



Paramount 



1927 



..Sept. 
..Aug. 



10.. 



. Apr. 
..Ji.ug. 



1927 

23 
13 



Afraid to Love (C) Vidor 6199 

Barbed Wire (D) Negri-Brook 6951.. 

Beau Gcste (M) Colman-N. Beery 9879.. 

Blind Alleys (M) Meighan 5597 Mar. 5 

Blonde or Brunette? (C)..Menjou 5878 Jan. 15 

Cabaret (CD) Gilda Gray 7175 May 9 

Casey at the Bat (C) W. Beery 6040 Apr. 16 

Chang (D) Jungle Life 6536 Sept. 3 May 2 

Children of Divorce (D)..Bow 6871 - May 2 

City Gone Wild, 

The (M) _ Meighan-Millner 5408.....Nov. 12 Dec. 10 

Covered Wagon, The 

(M) Kerrigan-Wilson 7447 Aug. S 

Evening Clothes (C) Menjou 6287 Apr. 9 

Fashions for Women 

(CD) Ralston 6298 _ Apr. 9 

Fireman Save My 

Child (C) ....Beery-Hatton 5399 Aug. 1 Dec. 10 

Gay Defender, The (CD). .Richard Dix 6376 Dec. 10 Nov. 12 

Gentleman of Paris, 

A (CD) Menjou-O'Hara 5927 Oct. 15 Oct. 8 

Get Your Man (CD) Clara Bow 5889 Dec. 10 Dec. 10 

Honeymoon Hate (CD).... Florence Vidor 5415..._.Dec. 3 Dec. 31 Dec. 17 

Hotel Imperial (D).._;.. Negri ...7091 ....Jan. 8 

Hula (CD) Bow-Brook 5862 Aug. 27.... Sept. 16 

It (C) Clara Bow '5542 -Feb. 12 

Jesse James (D) Fred Thomson 8656...-.Oct. 22 ....Oct. 22 

Kid Brother (C) Lloyd 7654 Jan. 29 

Kiss in a Taxi (C) Daniels 6429 ....Apr. 2 

Knockout Reilly (CD) Dix 7080 Apr. 23 

Last Waltz, The (D) Special Cast _ 6940 Nov. 26.... Nov. 19 

Let It Rain (C) MacLean 6052 Mar. 12 

Love's Greatest Mistake 

(CD) Brent 6000 - Feb. 26 

Man Power (D) Dix 5617 -■■ Aug. 6 

Mme. Pompadour (D) .... Moreno-D. Gish 7180 Aug. 13 ....Nov. 26 Aug. 6 

Metropolis (D) Special Cast 8039 Aug. 13.... - Mar. 12 

New York (M) Cortez-Wilson 6877 Feb. 5 

Nevada (W) Cooper-Todd 6258 Sept. 10 

Now We're in the 

Air (C) B,eery-Hatton 5798 — J^ec. 17 

One Woman to Another 

(CD) Vido-Shotwell ...4022 Sept. 24 Sept. 24 

Open Range (W) Lane Chandler 5599 Nov. 5 

Paradise for Two (C) Dix-Bronson 6187 - Jan. 29 

Pioneer Scout, The (W)..Fred Thomson - ..Jan. 21 Dec. 10 

Potters (CD) W. C. Fields 6680 -Jan. 22 

Ritzy (CD) Bronson 5306 - June 25 

Road to Glory, The (D).. Jannings-Brent _ , „„ 

Rolled Stockings (CD)....Hall-Brook . 6247 July 30 

Rough House Rosie (C)..Bow 5952 V, 

Rough Riders, The (D) .... Astor-Farrell 8443.....0ot. 1 Mar. 19 

Rubber Heels (FC) Ed Wvnn 5614 July 16 

Running Wild (C) Fields-Brian 8368 Aug. 20 June 18 

Senorita (F) ....Daniels 6634 May 14 

Serenade (D) Menjou-Wray ..5209 Dec. 24 o <. o 

Service for Ladies (C).... Menjou-Carver 6170 j\ug. 6 ^. a;— ■-•S^^'^- , ? 

Shanghai Bound (D) Dix-Brian 5515 Oct. 15 Dec. 31.....Nov. 12 

She's a Sheik (C) ..Bebe Daniels 6015 Nov. 12.. JNov. 

Shootin' Irons (W) Luden-Bronson 5179 Oct. 8 

Soft Cushions (C) MacLean-Carol 6S38 Aug. 27 Aug. 27 

Special Delivery (C) E<kUe Cantor 5524 May 9 

Spotlight, The (CD) Ralston-Hamilton 4943 Nov. 19 ^^c. A 

Street of Sin (D) Jannin.gf!-Wray Dee. 1" 

Stark Love (D) Special Cast 6203 Sept. 17 Mar. 19 

Swim, Girl. Swim (CM)..I>aniels-Hall 1U24 Sept. 1- Sept. 17 

Telephone Girl (M) Bellamy r,455 May .1 

Tell It to Sweeney (C).... Conklin-Bancroft 6006 Sept. 24 Oct. 2<J 

Ten Modern Command- ^ i nt 

mcnts (CD) Ralston '!407 July 23 

Time to Love (FC) Raymond Griffith 4926 July 9 

Two Flaming Youths 

(C) Fields-Ckjnklin 5319 Dec. 17 

Underworld (M) Bancroft-Brent 7453 Oct. 2U Sept._3 

Way of All Flesh, , , „ 

The (D) Jannings-Bennett 8486 Oct. 1 July 2 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



71 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures Reviews 



We're All Gamblers (D)..Meighan-Millner 5935 Sept. 3 

Wedding Bills (F) Raymond Griffith 5869 „..JuIy 23 

Whirlwind of Youth (D).. Lois Moran 5866 „ _ June 11 

Wings (M) Charles Rogers Aug. 20 

Woman on Trial (D). Pola Negri 5960 Oct. 29 Dec. 24 Oct. 1 



1928 

Adventure Mad (M) UFA - Mar. 31 

Beau Sabreur (M) Cooper-Brent 6536 Jan. 7 

Beauty Doctor, The Adolphe Menjou Mar. 

Doomsday Vidor-Cooper Feb. 

Feel My Pulse Daniels-Arlen Feb. 

Gentlemen Prefer 

Blondes (C) Taylor- White _ Jan. 28 Dec. 10 

Glory Girl, The (CD) Esther Ralston Jan. 21 

Honky Tonk (M)..._ George Bancroft Feb. 25 

Jazz Orphan, The (CD)..Esther Ralston Jan. 14 

Last Command, The (D)..Emil Jannings Jan. 21 

Legion of Condemned, 

The „Wray-Cooper Mar. 10 

Love and Learn, Ralston-Chandler Jan. 14 

Now We're in Dutch 

(C) Beery-Hatton - Jan. 

Old Ironsides (D) Beery-Bancroft 

Farrell-Raleton Mar. 

Partners in Crime (C).... BeeiT-Hatton Mar. 

Peaks of Destiny UFA —Jan. 

Red Hair (CD) Bow-Rogers Mar. 

Santa Fe Scout, 

The (W) Fred Thomson Jan. 21 

Secret Hour, The (D) Negri-Hereholt 7194 Feb. 4 

Speedy (C) Harold Lloyd Mar. 3 

Tillie's Punctured 

Romance FTelds-Conklin Feb. 18 

Traveling Salesman Dix-Stedman Feb. J 1 

Under the Tonto Rim Arlen-Brian Feb. 4. 

Wife Savers (C) Beery-Hatton Jan. 7 



1928 



24 

18 
25 



14 

3 
17 
28 
3 



Krelbar Productions 



1927 

Broadway After Mid- 
night , 



.Betz 



,.6199.. 



1927 
..Oct. 29 



Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 



1927 

Adam and Evil (CD) Cody-Pringle 6667 Aug. 

Adventurer, The (W) Tim McCoy 4709 Dec. 

After Midnight (D) Shearer-Gray 6312 Aug. 

Annie Laurie (D). Lillian Gish 8730 Sept. 

Becky (CD) _SalIy O'Neil 6439...„.Nov. 

Ben Hut (M) Ramon Novarro 12000....Oct. 

Big City (D) Ion Chaney 

Big Parade, The (M) Gilberts Adoree 12550-...Sept. 

Body and Soul (D) L. Barrymore 5902 Oct. 

Bridal Night, The. Norma Shearer Dec. 

Bugle Call, The (D) Jackie Owgan 5821 Aug. 

Buttons (CD) Jackie Coogan 6050 Dec. 

Callahans and Murphys 

(CD) JDresser-Moran 6126 

Captain Salvation (M)....Hanson _ 7395 

Certain Young Man, 

A (D) Novarro-Adoree Septi 

Cossack, The (D) _..„.John Gilbert _ 

Demj-Bride (CD) Shearer _ _.6886 

Fair Go-ed, The (CD) Marion Davies „.6408 Oct. 

Foreign Devils (W) Tim McCoy 4658 Sept. 

Garden of Allah, 

The (D) Terry-Petrovitch 8156 Nov. 

Frisco Sally Levy (C) O'Neil „...6909 

In Old Kentucky (D) H. Ckjstello 6646 Oct. 

Law of the Range, 

The (W) McCk)y-Crawford 

Little Journey (CD) All-Star 6088 

London After Midnight 

(D) Lon Chaney „.5687 Dec. 

Lovers (D) Novarro-Terry 5291 _ 

Lovelorn, The Sally O'Neil „6110 Dee. 

Man, Woman and 

Sin (D) John Gilbert 6280 Nov. 

Mr. Wu (M) Lon Chaney 7603 

Mockery (M) _.Lon Chaney 5957 Aug. 

Patsy, The (CD) _. Marion Davies 

Red Mill (C) Davies 6337 

Road to Romance, 

The (D) Novarro-Day 6581 Sept. 

Rookies (C) Dane-Arthur _ 6640 

Rose Marie (CD) J. Murray-Crawford.. 

Show, The (M) Gilbert-Adoree 6309 _ 

Slide, Kelly, Slide (CD)..Haines-0'Neil -.7865 

Spring Fever (C) William Haines 6705 Oct. 

Spoilers of the West 

(W) McCoy-Daw 6280 Dec. 

Taxi Dancer (D) Crawford-O. Moore....6203 

Tea for Three (C) Gody-Pringle 6273 Dec. 

Thirteenth Hour, 

The (D) Lionel Barrjmiore 5252 Nov. 

Tillie the Toiler (C) Davies _ 6160 

Twelve Miles Out (M).... Gilbert 7899 

Understanding Heart 

(D) Crawford 6657 

Unknown, The (M) Chaney _ 5517 



1927 

27 Aug. 13 

10 

20 Aug. 27 

17 _ JVIay 21 

12 ....Nov. 26 

8 JSTov. 12 

10 

1 Nov. 26 Nov. 19 

31 
6 

24 Dee. 31 



..July 16 
...July 2 



24 



, Apr. 2 

15......NOV. 10 Oct. 29 

3 

5 . Nov. 19 Sept. 10 

Apr. 23 

29 Nov. 26 Dec. 3 



..Jan. 15 



3 Dec. 17 Dec. 17 

- May 2 

17......Dec. 31 

19 __D6e. 3 Dec. 17 

_ _ June 4 

13 Sept. 10 

Feb. 19 



24....NOV. 19 



• May 9 



Mar. 19 

Apr. 2 

22 Nov. 12 Dec. 10 



10 



Dee. 24 

Mar. 12 

10 Dec. 24 JSTov. 12 

26 ....Dec. 3 Dec. 3 

Jfune 11 

_ July 30 



1928 

Divine Woman, The (D)..Garbo-Hanson Jan. 14 

Forbidden Hours (D) Novarro-Adoree Jan. 7 

Love (D) „. Gilbert-Garbo 7365 Jan. 2.... 

Quality Street (D) Marion Davies 7627 Jan. 28.. 

Student Prince, The (R)..Novarro-Shearer 9566 Jan. 25 _., 

West Point (CD) Haines-Crawford Jan. 21 



...-May 14 
..June 18 

1928 



.... Dec. 3 
.Nov. 12 
,„. Sept. 24 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures 



Reviews 



Pathe 



1927 



1927 



Almost Human (CD) Reynolds 

Angel of Broadway, 

The (D) Leatrice Joy..._ 6555 Oct. 

Avenging Fangs (M) 4335 

Border Blackbirds (WD)..Maloney 5326 Aug. 

Born to Battle (W)..._ Bill Cody 4875 Sept. 

Code of the Cow 

Country (W) Roosevelt 4512 

Combat (D) Walsh-Adams 5100 Oct. 

Country Doctor, The (D)..Schildkraut 7400 Aug. 

Desert of the Lost, 

The (W) _ Walfy Wales 4933 Dec. 

Devil's Twin, The (W)....Leo Maloney 5468. Dec. 

Discord (D) Dagover-Ekman 8586 Nov. 

Don Desperado (W) Maloney 5804 May 

Dress Parade (D) Boyd- Love . 6599 Nov. 

Eyes of the Totem (M)....Hawley 6228 

Fighting Love (D) Goudal 7107 

Fighting Eagle, The (M)..La Roque-Haver 7972 Aug. 

Flying Luck (C) Monty Banks 6403 Dec. 

Forbidden Woman, 

The (M) Jetta Goudal „.6568 Nov. 

Getting Gertie's 

Garter (F) Prevoet 6859 

Girl from Every- 
where (C) 3303 

Girl in the Pullman, 

The (C) Prevost-Ford 5867 Oct, 

Gold from Weepah (W)....BilI Cody 4960 Nov. 

Golden Clown, The (D).... Gosta-Ekman 7913 Dec. 

Grandma's Boy (C) Harold Lloyd..._ 4750 J)ec. 

Harp in Hock, A (D) Schildkraut _.5990._...Oct. 

Heart of the Yukon (M)..Bowers 6563 

Heart Thief (D) Sehildkraut-De Putti..6035 

His Dog (D) Schildkraut _6788 

His First Flame (C) Langdon 4700 

His Foreign Wife (D) Edna Murphy 4890 Nov. 

Hidden Aces (M) Hutchison-Calhoun ....4620 Aug. 

Hoof Marks (W) Jack Donovan 4076 Nov. 

Interferin' (Jent, 

The (W) Buffalo Bill, Jr 4864 Aug. 

Jim, the C/onqueror (W).. Boyd-Faire 5324 

King of Kings (D) All star 13500 

Land of the Lawless, 

The (W) Jack Padjan 4131 Dec. 

Little Firebrand (C) Thornton 4615 July 

Main Event, The (D) Reynolds-Delaney 6472 Nov. 

Man Bait (CD) _ Prevost 5865 Jan. 

Meddlin' Stranger (W).... Wales 4576 

My Friend from 

India (F) _ Pangborn-Fair .i5750 Dec. 

Night Bride (FC) Prevost 5736 

Nobody's Widow (FC) Joy-Rlay-Haver 6421 

No Man's Law (W) Rex „ 6903 

Obligin' Buckaroo, 

The (W) Buffalo Bill, Jr 4575 Oct. 

Pals in Peril (W) Buffalo Bill, Jr 4740 

Phantom Buster, 

The (W) Roosevelt-Rayford 6000..._.Aug. 

Pieces of China _ (Travel) 6000 Aug. 

Pirates of the Sky (M) .... Hutchison 5465 

Rejuvenation of Aunt 

Mary (C) _ Robson 5844 

Ride 'Em High (W) Buddy Roosevelt 4542 Oct. 

Roarin' Broncs _ Buffalo Bill, Jr 4375 JSTov. 

Rubber Tires (C) Ford-Love 6303 

Rush Hour, The (C) Prevoet-Ford 5880 Dec. 

Skeedaddle Gold (W) Wales 4562.. 

Soda- Water Cowboy, 

The (W) Wally Wales 4546 Sept. 

Trunk Mystery (M) Hutchison 4329 — 

Two-Gun of Tumble- 

weed (W) „ 5670 

Turkish Delight Schildkraut-Faye 5397 Nov. 

Vanity (M) Joy 5921 

White Gold (D) Goudal 6198 

White Pebbles (WD) Wally Wales 4485 Sept. 

Wise Wife, The (C) Haver-T. Moore 5610 Oct. 

Wreck of the Hesperus, 

The (M) Hale-De Grasse Oct. 

Yankee Clipper (M) Boyd 7820 



5596 Dec. 26 Dec. 24 



3 Nov. 19 Nov. 5 

June 4 

28 Sept. 10 

11 



..June 11 
...Oct. 15 



23 

22 

18 

11 Dec. 10 

20 

9 May 9 

11 Nov. 19 Nov. 5 

May 14 

June 4 

29 Sept. 17 

5 

7 Nov. 12 Nov. 5 

Feb. 19 

_ Nov. 5 



31 Nov. 19 Nov. 5 

20 
18 
11 

10 Nov. 12 Nov. 5 

May 21 

May 21 

Sept. 3 

_ May 9 

27 

7 _ Sept. 3 

13 

21 _ Aug. 27 

Jan. 1 

: ~ Apr. 23 



25 

2 July 2 

18. Nov. 19 Nov. 5 

29 Jan. 29 

1 June 4 



19 Dec. 24 



....May 9 
..Jan. 15 
....May 2 



16 Oct. 8 

_ June 25 



14 Aug. 20 

7 

May 21 



Aug. 6 

9._ Oct. 8 

27 

Apr. 9 

12 

Aug. 6 



...Oct. 1 
..June 11 



25.. 



11 



..July 23 



_ June 18 

Apr. 9 

4 Aug. 20 

24 Nov. 19 Nov. 5 



31 



1928 

Ballyhoo Buster (W) Buffalo Bill, Jr Jan. 

Blue Danube Leatrice Joy Feb. 

Chicago (M) Phyllis Haver 5503 JMar. 

Cowboy Clavalier (W) Buddy Ebosevelt 5426 Jan. 

Laddie Be Good (W) Bill Cody Jan. 

Leopard Lady, The (M).... Logan-Hale Jan. 

Let 'Er Go 

Gallegher! (M) Junior Coghlan Jan. 

On to Reno (D) Prevost- Landis Jan. 

Perfect Gentleman, 

A (C) Monty Banks 5626 Jan. 15 

Stand and Deliver Rod La Rocque Mar. 12 

Walking Back (M) Vera Reynolds Mar. 26 

What Price Beauty 

(CD) Nita Naldi Jan. 22 



..May 14 
1928 



.Dec. 24 



16 

2 Dec. 31 



..Sept. 24 



Tiffany-Stahl 



1927 1927 

Backstage (CD) Bedford 5754 ..;.July 9 

Beauty Shoppe (CD) Busch 5669 _ July 16 

Broken Gate (D) 5300 „ Jan. 15 

Cheaters (M) O'Malley 6024 „ Mar. 24 

College Days (CD) M. Day .7300 „ Nov. 6 

Enchanted Island (D) 4887 June 25 

First Night, The (FC)....Lytell-Devore 5500 : Feb. 19 

Fools of Fashion (CD). ...Busch 6482 _ Oct. 9 

Girl from Gay Paree, 

The (F) Sherman-Bedford 5233 Sept. 15....Nov. 19....Sept. 24 

Haunted Ship, The (M)..Sebastian-M. Love 4753 Dec. 1 

Husband Hunters (C) Marsh 5600 Feb. 26 



72 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



Title 



Players 



New 

tienerth Released Pictures Reviews 



Josselyn's Wife (D) —Frederick 5800 JSTov. 27 

Lightning (W)...- J. Ralston. . .. 6049..„..Sept. 1 

Night Life fCD) Day-Harron 6235 JsTov. 1 Dec. 3.._..Dec. 10 

Once and Forever (D)....Patsy Ruth Miller 5639 Oct. 15 Nov. 12 

Sin Cargo (D) Mason - 6100 _ _ Dec. 11 

Snowbound (FC) BIythe _ 5182_ _ July 30 

Streets of Shanghai 

(RD) -Starke-Harlan Dec. 15 

Tired Business Man (C) „ _ „ _ 

Wild Geese (D) Belle Bennett 6448 Nov. 15 Dec. 24 Dec. 10 

Women's Wares (D) Brenf>Lytell 5614 Oct. 1 Nov. 12 Nov. 19 



1928 

Woman Against the 

World (D) _ Olmstead-Ford 



..Jan. 1 



Rayart 

1927 

Cruise of the Helion (D)..A11 star _ 6089 

Heroes in Blue (M) Bowers-Rand Nov. 

Law and the Man, 

The (D) Santschi-Eockwell Dec. 

Light in the Window, 

A (D) Walthal 5960 _ 

On the Stroke of 

Twelve (M) _ D. Torrence.. Nov. 

Silent Hero (M) Bonaparte _.5502 

Wanderer of the 

West, A (W) Tex Maynard. , Dec. 

Wild Born (W) —Tex Maynard. Jan. 

1928 

Casey Jones (CD) Price-Lewis Jan. 

Heart of Broadway, 

The (D) Garon-Agnew Jan. 



1928 



1927 

..Sept. 24 



..Nov. 12 
..Aug. 20 



1928 



Sterling 



1927 



1927 

Burning Up Broadway 

. (D) - H. Costello Jan. 30 Dec. 3 

Closed Gates (M) _.Harron-Novak 5563 

Outcast Souls (D) Lewis-Bonner 5400 Dec. 15 Nov. 12 

Pretty Clothes (D) _...J. Ralston-Walker 5500 Oct. 15 .Dec. 31 

Stranded (D) Mason Aug. 15 Sept. 10 



..May 28 



1928 

Marry the Girl (CD). 



1928 



United Artists 



1927 1927 

Beloved Rogue (M) _..J. Barrymore 9264 Apr. 2 

College (C) Keaton-Cornwall 5900 Sept. 10._ :...Sept. 17 

Garden of Eden, The (D)C. Griffith-Ray _ ._ JJov. 

General, The (C)_ Keaton 7500 Feb. 12 

Loves of Sonya (D). Swanson _ 7311 „ Mar. 19 

Magic Flame, The (M)....Colman-Banky .8550 Sept. 24.._ Sept. 24 

My Best Girl (M) _ Mary Pickford Nov. Nov. 12 

Night of Love (M) Banky-Colman — 7440 Jan. 29 

Resurrection (M) J^a Rocqua _ 9120 _ Apr. 16 

Sadie Thompson (D) Gloria Swanson Dec. 

Sorrell and Son (D) Warner-Nileson 9000 Nov. Nov. 19 

Tempest (M) John Barrymore _ Dec. 

Topsy and Eva (C) Duncan Sisters 7456 Aug. 13 

Two Arabian 

i Knights (CD) Boyd-Wolheim 8250 Oct. 29 

Winning of Barbara 

worth (D) „ Banky-Colman 8000 Dec. 4 



1928 

Circus, The (C> 

Devil Dancer, The 

Douglas Fairbanks as 

the Gaucho (M) 

Dove, The (M) 

Drums of Love (D) — 
Ramona (D) . 



1927 



1928 



..Charlie Chaplin.. 
...Gilda Gray 



..Fairbanks _ _ _...Nov. 

..Norma Talmadge. Jan. 

..Mary Philbin _. Jan. 



26 



Warner Brothers 



1927 

..May 9 



Bitter Apples (M) Blue 5453 

Black Diamond 

Express (M) Blue 5803 July 23 

Brass Knuckles (D) _BIu6-Bronson 6330 Dec. 3 

Brute, The (D) Blue _ 5901.._ May 2 

Bush Leaguer, The (CD) ..Monte Blue. 6281 jVug. 20 

Climbers, The (D) „ Rich _ 6631 May 28 

Dearest (D) Rich 5897 June 18 

Desired Woman, The 

(M) Irene Rich „...6408 Aug. 27 

Dog of the Regimient, 

A (M)..._ _ _.Rln-Tin-Tin 5003 Oct. 20 

Don't "rcll the Wife (C)..Rich 6972 Feb. 5 

First Auto, The Oldfield-Miller -..6767 ^pt. 18 July 9 

Fortune Hunter, 

iThe (C)..._ Syd C^iaplin 6639 J^ov. 7 

Gay Old Bird (FC) Fazenda 6284_ _ Mar. 12 

Girl from Chicago, 

The (M) -...Nagel-Loy 5978.._..Nov. 5 

Ginsberg the Great (C)....Jessel 5390 Nov. 26 

Glorious Betsy (CD) _ Dolores Costello 

CkM>d Time Charley (D).. Oland-H. Costello 6302. Nov. 12 Nov. 26 

Ham and Eggs at the 

Front (C) Wil.son-H. Conklin 5613 -Dec. 24 

Heart of Maryland (M)....D. Costello 5968— July 30 

Hills of Kentucky (M). Rin-Tin-Tin 6271 _ Feb. 26 

Husbands for Rent All Star 5200..— Dec. 31 

If I Were Sinirlc McAvoy-Nagel 6230 Dec. 17 

Irish Hearts (CD) McAvoy 5397 June 11 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures Reviews 



17, 



Jaws of Steel (D) Rin-Tin-Tin j569 Sept. 

Matinee Ladies (C) McAvoy -6352 

Million Bid, A (M) D. Costello 6310 

Missing Link, The (C)....Syd Chaplin 6485 Aug. 

Old San Francisco (M)....D. Ctostello-Oland 7961 Sept. 

One Round Hogan (M)....Monte Blue. 6357.— .Sept. 

Reno Divorce, A (D) May McAvoy 5492 Oct. 

Sailor Izzy Murphy (F)... .George Jessel 6295 Oct. 

Sailor's Sweetheart, 

A (C) Fazenda-C. Ctook 5685 Sept. 

Silver Slave, The (D) Rich-Ferrie 6124 Nov. 

Slightly Used..- McAvoy-Nagel 6412 Sept. 

Simple Sis (M) Fazenda ...6218 _ 

Third Degree (M) D. Costello _ 7647 „ 

Tracked by the Police 

(M) _ Rin-Tin-Tin .._ 5813 _ 

What Every Girl Should 

Know (CD).... Miller 6281... 

What Happened to 

Father (C) Oland 5567 

When a Man Loves (R).. Barrymore 10081....Aug. 

White Flannels (M) Dresser 6820 

Wolf's Clothing (M) Blue-Miller 7068 _ 

1928 

Across the Atlantic Blue-Murphy Feb. 25 

Beware of Married Men....Irene Rich Jan. 14 

City of Sin, The Loy-Miljan-Wong 

Jazz Singer, The Al Jolson._ Oct. 22 

Lion and the Mouse, The..L. Barrymore 

Little Snob, The May McAvoy _.Feb. 11 

Powder My Back (C) -Rich-Ferris Mar. 10 

Race for Life _ Rin-Tin-Tin Jan. 28 

Rinty of the Desert Rin-Tin-Tin Dec. 10 

Tenderloin -...Dolores C!ostello 



— — Oct. 1 

— Apr. 23 

— - June 4 

7 May 14 

4 June 25 

17..- _ Oct. 8 

22 Oct. 29 

8 Dec. 10 

24 Oct. 15 

9 

3 

June 11 

: Jan. 8 



May 21 

Mar. 19 



- July 9 

21 - Feb. 12 

- -Apr. 2 

- Jan. 29 

1928 



Universal 



1927 



1927 



..Sept. 4 Nov. 12- 



Aug. 6 
.May 9 



..Jan. 1 
May 28 



Back to God's Country 

(D) — Adoree-Prazier 5751 

Beware of Widows (FC)..La Plante 5777, 

Border Cavalier, 

The (W).— Humes-Pierce 4427 Sept. 18 

Buck Privates Lya De Putti Nov. 6 

Butterflies in the Rain 

(D) _..„ _ La Plante 7319 — . 

Claw, The (D) — Windsor 5252 

Cat and the Canary, 

The (My) La Plante............ 7790 Sept. ll„..Dec. 17. May 14 

Cheating Cheaters (C)....Compson-Harland 5623 Oct. 9 Nov. 26 

Chinese Parrot, The 

(MyD) Nixon-Turner 7304..— Oct. 23 Nov 26 

aean Up Man, The (W)..Ted Wells 4232 Dec. 18 

Desert Dust (W) Ted Wells ——.........4349 Dee. 18 Dec. 17 

Denver Dude (W) Gibson 5292 Feb 26 

Down the Stretch (M) Agnew ....6910 May 2 

Fangs of Destiny (W)— Dynamite 3295 Dec. 4 

Fighting Three (W) Hoxie 4198..- May 21 

Fourth Commandment 

(D) -..Bennett 6892 Apr. 23 

Foreign Legion (D) Kerry-Stone ..— „ 

Galloping Fury (W) -Hoot Gibson 5503 Nov. 20 Deo. 24 

Grinning Guns (W)...- Hoxie _ 4689 May 14 

Held by the Law (M) Lewis 6929 .Apr 2 

Hero for the Night, A Tryon-Miller 5711 Dee. 18 JnTov 26 

Hey, Rube (W) Hoot Gibson 

Hey! Heyl Cowboy (W)„Gibson 5378 j^pj.. 9 

Irresistible Lover, The 

(CD) Kerry-Moran .- „6958 ...Dec. 4 Dec. 17 Nov. 19 

Jazz Mad (D) Hersholt-Nixon - 

Les Miserables (M) _ Gabrio-Toulont 7713 Oct. 23 : Aug. 27 

Les Miserables (M) (Long version) 11,000 _ _ 

Loco Luck (W) - Acord 4827 _ _ Jan 22 

Lone Eagle, The Kent-Keane -5862 Sept. 18...JSrov 12 

Love Thrill (FC) La Plante. -.6038 Mav 21 

Man Who Laughs (D) ..-Veidt-Philbin -. ' " 

Man's Past, A (D) Veidt-Kent 6135 Dec. 25 .Dec. 17.. Sept. 17 

Men of Daring (W) Hoxie — 6155 ' ^pr 9 

On Tonr^Tocs (C) Denny-Worth 5918 J^ov. 27 " ~" " 

One Glorious Scrap — Humes-Holmes „4122 Nov. 20 Dec. 17 

One Man Game (W) Humes -.4689 Jeh 12 

Out All Night (C>.- Denny-Nixon 6170 Sept. 4 .'."."1..0ct. 1 

Painted Ponies (W) Hoot Gibson 5416 Sept. 25.-JJ'ov 19 julv 23 

Painting the Town (FC)..Tryon 5900 Jung 25 

Perch of the Devil (M)....Busch _. 6807 ' 5 

Rough and Ready (W)....Hoxie 4409 ...Jan. 8 

Sensation Seekers (D) Dove 7015 I.. Jan 29 

Shield of Honor (M) Lewis 6172 - „ !".!j)ec' 17 

Silk Stockings Laura La Plante. 6166 Oct. 2 _>Iov. 19 Au? 20 

Sky High Saunders Al Wilson. 4393 Nov. 6 

Small Bachelor, The (C)..Beranger-Kent 6305 Nov. 6 Dec 3 

Straight Shootin' (W) Wells 4259 Oct. 16 

Surrender (M) _ —.Philbin _ 8249 Nov 19 

Taxil Taxi! (FC) Horton 

Thirteenth Juror, The 

(D) - Bushman-Nilsson 

13 Washington Square....Jean Hei-sholt. 

Three Miles Up Al Wilson 4041.. 

Uncle Tom's Cabin (M)..A1I star 12.000.. 

Wild Beauty (CD) —Rex — 5192 Nov. 27 Dec. 24" 

Wild Blood. Rex 

Wrong Mr. Wright, The 

(P) Hersholt 6450 

Wolf's Trail - Dynamite, the dog. 4167 Oct. 2 

1928 

Air Patrol, The (W) Al Wilson 

Alias the Deacon (CD)....HershoIt-Marlowe 
Call of the Heart, 

The (W) Dynamite 

C!ohens and Kellys In 

Paris (C) Sidney Jan. 1 

Fearless Rider, The (W)..Fred Humes Jan. 15 

Finders Keepers (CD) Laura La Plante. Feb. 5 

Rawhide Kid (W) Hoot Gibson Jan. 29 

That's My Daddy (C) Denny-Kent 



•■7"2 _ Feb. 1» 

..5598 Nov. 13 Dec. 3 



..Sept. 4 



..Nov. 12 



..Mar. 5 



...4259 Jan. 1 

...6869 Jan. 22.. 



1928 

..June 25 



..Jan. 29 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



:-73 



TO WORLD READERS 

Service departments of MOVING PICTURE WORLD will he found on the following pages of this issue of EXHIB- 
ITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD: 



"Selling the Picture to the Public" 64 

"Through the Box Office Window" 61 

"Quick Reference Picture Chart" 69 

"Better Projection" 50 

"Little Pictures with the Big Punch" 47 

"HoUywood" 40 

"Straight from the Shoulder Reports" 79 

"Live News from Coast to Coast" 46 

"This Week and Next" 36 

"Stage and Pit" 52 



LETTERS 
From Readers 

A forum at which the exhibitor is 
invited to express his opinion on 
matters of current interest. Brevity 
adds forcefulness to any statement. 
Unsigned letters will not be printed. 



From Across the Sea 

LUDLOW, ENGLAND.— To the Editor: 
Herewith cheque which is one year's subscrip- 
tion to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Pic- 
ture World. 

Soon after I received your paper first, 
I began to keep a card index file of exhib- 
itors reporting to "What the Picture Did 
for Me." As an exhibitor played a picture 
which I had shown, I compared his verdict 
with mine by a simple system of signs. 
When I had a fairly big number of exhib- 
itors, I began to look up new pictures with 
the aid of the file, which showed me how 
far an exhibitor was to be relied upon. 
There are a few — Wm. Tragsdorf is one — 
whose patrons' verdicts are so exactly sim- 
ilar to my own that I could rely simply and 
solely on them. 

I began showing "Herald Chosen" pic- 
tures in September, and I can only say that 
it is the finest method in the world of 
choosing pictures where you cannot see 
them personally. 

I must als© praise "The Box Office 
Ticker." Experience has proved that pic- 
tures below 50 per cent are mostly poor. 
I would advise all small town exhibitors in 
America and England to take and study 
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World and to keep a card index file. 

I seem to know the "old brigade" who 
report regularly personally now, and much 
enjoy J. C.'s "Colyum." J. C.'s travels are 
making me familiar with the geography of 
the U. S. I suggest he write a book en- 
titled, "Painless Study of the Geography of 
the U. S. A.," written by J. C. Jenkins, 
edited by Phil Rand, with poetry by Adeline 
Further. I don't know who'll draw the 
maps. 

Over in England, production is going 
ahead like a rocket in both quality and 
quantity. In 1926 we made 26 films. For 
the year October, 1928, there will probably 
be over 100 British films available. That 
will mean small town theatres will be able 
to show '40 to 50 per cent British, as our 
percentage of hits is far greater than Hol- 
lywood's — our producers can't aiTord a fail- 
ure. I have seen them working at the 



British International studios on "A Little 
Bit of Fluff" (Syd Chaplin and Betty Bal- 
four, our most popular star) which Metro 
will distribute in America; "The Farmer's 
Wife," directed by Alfred Hitchcock, wiio 
gets £13,000 a year, and who is one of 
the world's best directors. He made "The 
Ring" recently, a boxing picture which suc- 
ceeds where others have failed — to apneal 
to women. Albert Parker saw it here a 
few days ago and said that if made in 
America it would have been the hit of the 
season. Another American said it was "a 
British movie that America would have to 
take." There are two other films in pro- 
duction at B. I., "Moulin Rouge," directed 
by Dupont, and "Toni." The only trouble 
with B. I., who sell through their own 
agency, is that they have completely lost 
their heads and are asking ridiculous prices. 
Other British firms are afflicted with the 
same disease. The Trading Scheme would 
bring them to their senses. 

Most renters are up in arms against this 
huge cooperative buying scheme, which 
might involve 1,000 theatres. These gentle- 
men foresee that it will forcibly cure them 
of their gluttonous plans to bring the 
American situation to England. Yours 
truly.— R. R. TEMPLE, Picture House, 
Ludlow, England. 



Praises "Service Talks" 

BANGOR, N. WALES.— To the Editor: 
I have the greatest pleasure in renewing my 
subscription to Exhibitors Herald and Mov- 
ing Picture World, which has been of the 
greatest assistance to me during the past 12 
months. I read every line of it and it then 
goes the round of my staff. 

I have found "Service Talks" particularly 
helpful, and to a considerable extent "What 
the Picture Did for Me" proves a useful guide. 
With regard to this latter feature, I am afraid 
in one or two cases the writers are somewhat 
biased in their reports but on the whole they 
are a very fair census of the general opinion 
regarding picture values. 

With best wishes for continued success in 
'28.— James Hare, County theatre, Bangor, N. 
Wales. 



"By Gad, We Need It" 

SALFORD, MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
— To THE Editor: Enclosed find two-year 
subscriptions and congratulations for the way 
you run your show. It is a good help to 
we poor stiffs of exhibitors, and by gad we 
need it and your report column is priceless, 
for I rather do enjoy our brother exhibitors' 
remarks on features, and renters in particular. 
All best wishes, old son.— Bill Johnson, 
Boro Cinema, Salford, Manchester, England. 



Stanley Company's 
Earnings for 1927 
Exceed $4 Share 

( special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4.— Earnings of the 
Stanley Company of America for 1927 were 
in excess of the dividend requirements of 
$4 a share by a considerable margin, it was 
announced by D. Rossheim, treasurer, to direc- 
tors at their recent regular monthly meeting. 

During the past year the number of theatres 
under the control of the Stanley Company has 
increased three-fold and the benefits of the 
absorption of several circuits are now evident. 



Loeiv's Midland Forces 
Royal, First Film Palace 
In Kansas City, to Close 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

KANSAS CITY, Jan. 4.— The Royal thea- 
tre, built 14 years ago by Frank L. New- 
man, the first motion picture house of the 
larger type in Kansas City and now one of 
three houses under lease to Loew interests, 
closed its doors January 1. The disposi- 
tion of the property has not been deter- 
mined yet, M. B. Shanberg, managing di- 
rector for Loew's theatres in Kansas City, 
said. 

From a house of large audiences the 
Royal fell to a theatre which was host to 
mere handful of people, following the 
opening of the new $4,000,000 Loew's Mid- 
land. 



Pictures to Teach History 
Soon, Educator Declares 

( special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 4.— Motion pictures 
within a few years will be used almost en- 
tirely in studying history in American schools 
and colleges, according to Charles R. Allen, 
educational consultant of the Federal Board 
of Vocational Education, who recently visited 
the studios. 

"Studios are filled with technical experts," 
said Allen, "who are specialists in their parti- 
cular field. These men could easily turn 
their talent to the making of historiral pic- 
tures with the assistance, of course, of men 
who are qualified to teach history." 



January 7, 1928 EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 75 




EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



AND FOR NEXT SEASON 




Colleen Moore's leading man for "Lilac Time" is Gary Cooper. 

John <McCormicl^presents 

COLUEEAr 

Lillac 111 me 




Director of box office 
successes galore. 



AGeoii^Rtzmauike 
ProducHon 

The greatest special of her glorious career, filled 
with glamour, beauty and heart-throbs (from the 
famous Jane Cowl stage success.) 

A"3inAt notional Picture 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



77 



JphfL 
■Comtc^p/mfitj 

PLLEEN 
OQRp 

The exciting drama of an unsophis- 
ticated girl plunged into the midst of 
New York's underworld whirlpool. 





John <McCormick 
presents'^ 



COILILIEEi^ 



The musical-comedy sensation of New York, 
London and Australia. The lilting, dramatic ad- 
ventures of an aristocratic madcap who thought 
bootlegging an easy living! 



A lirtt national Picture 




Adapted by EJsie Janis 
herself, reigning inter- 
national star. 



78 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



CLASSIFIED 
Advertising 

Ten cents per word, payable in advance. Minimum charge, 
$1.00. Copy and checks should be addressed Classified Ad 
Dept. Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World, 407 So. 
Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

The Recognized National Classified Advertising Medium 




For Sale 



FOR SALE — Late Universal Motion Picture Cam- 
era, five lenses, turrett head, tripod, leather carrying 
case. Used only three months. Address W. B. 
Crooks, Majestic Theatre, Benicia, California. 



FOR SALE— CIRCUS BLEACHER SEATS, al- 
ways a few hundred sections on hand. Five to ten 
tiers high. New and used. Can be used out or in- 
doors. Made by experienced circus people. We also 
rent seats for all purposes. Penn Bleacher Seat Co., 
Inc., 1207 West Thompson St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

FOR SALE — Two screens and three Powers ma- 
chines, will sell cheap. Address A. R. Workman, 
Marseilles, III. 

FOR SALE — 197 seat theatre in 1,600 populated 
town. Run seven days a week. Owner going west, 
must sell at once. A bargain for cash. For partic- 
ulars write Decatur Theatre, Decatur, Mich. 



Stationery 



NEARGRAVUREMBOSO Process printed station- 
ery, distinctive special 250 letterheads and envelopes 
type embossed $5.55 cash, postpaid. Samples. Ad- 
dress Sollidays, Knox, Indiana. 



Position Wanted 



THEATRE ORGANIST at liberty would like to 
get connected with a reliable house. Will go any- 
where. Address M. R. Waddell, 129 Forest Ave., 
Dalton, III. 

OPERATOR — wishes steady position with a reliable 
house, 18 years experience. Married, reliable, best 
of references. Address Fred T. Walker, 6247 Black- 
stone St., Chicago, 111. 

THEATRE ORGANIST — Experinced on all 
makes. Go any place. Mabel Young, Plaza Hotel, 
North Ave. and North Clark St., Room 212-B, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

ORGANISTS thoroughly trained and experienced 
in theatre work. Men and women now ready for 
good positions. Union or nonunion. Write salary 
and other data. Address, Chicago Musical College, 
64 E. Van Buren, Chicago. 

MALE organist, 10 years' experience, all makes, 
long time Morton demonstrator, solos, jazz, slides, 
cueing specialist. Studied Europe. Now working, 
would like position, good wages, with wide awake 
management, convinced music can draw. Send for 
circular, write-ups, photo, etc. Address Box 230, 
Exhibitors Herald, 407 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

PROJECTIONIST, 15 years' experience, desires 
connection with reputable chain. Complete repair 
shop enables me to keep equipment in A-1 condition. 
Rewind own motors and generators. Can save $s 
for any employer. Married, non-union, sober, reli- 
able. Address Box 229, Exhibitors Herald, 407 S. 
Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



MANAGER as operator, 15 years experience, can 
and am willing to do anything in the theatre, mar- 
ried, 38 years old. Address Mr. O. R. Haus, 
Hastings, Minn. 



Wanted to Buy 



PANATROPE or ORTHOPHONIC; must be a 
late model, in good condition and a bargain. 
Address Crockett Brown, Nashwauk, Minn. 



Gift Night Souvenirs 



GIFT NIGHT MERCHANDISE: Over 300 fine 
novelties in our large free catalog at genuine whole- 
sale prices. Write today. No obligation. Address 
Fair Trading Co., Inc., 307 Sixth Ave., New York. 



Organs for Sale 



SMITH UNIT THEATRE ORGANS: Factory 
rebuilt. Also Wurlitzers, Bartolas and Seeburg Pitz 
Organs. All factory rebuilt. Address Perfection 
Theatre Equipment Company, 711 Wells Street, Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. 



FOR SALE: Bartola Pipe Organ. Used Wurlitzer 
Pipe Organ, model U, very reasonable. Cremona 
Pipe Organ used or new .Reproduco Pipe Organs. 
Address S. B. McFadden, Havana, Illinois. 



Projector Repairing 

BEST REPAIR SHOP in the country for over- 
hauling and repairing projection machines, ticket 
machines, motors, etc. Expert workmanship, prompt 
service, reasonable prices. Movie Supply Company, 
844 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 



BIGGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED REPAIIt. 
SHOP in the South. Expert workmanship guaran- 
teed on all projectors, motors, generators, etc. Loan 
mechanism free. Address Monarch Theatre Supply 
Company, Memphis, Tenn. 



Mailing Lists 



21,000 MOVING PICTURE THEATRES showing 
population and seating capacity in most cases. Price 
$6 per M. or $50 for the complete list. 2,100 chain 
theatres operating from 2 to 150 theatres @ $22 per 
M. 1,043 Film Exchanges @ $10 per M. 222 Manu- 
facturers of studios @ $4 per M. 452 Moving Picture 
Machine and Supply Dealers @ $8.50 per M. All 
guaranteed 97% correct. Address Trade Circular 
Company, 166 W. Adams Street, Chicago, Illinois. 



Equipment Wanted 

WE PAY BEST prices for used opera chairs, pro- 
jection machines, ventilating fans, portable projec- 
tors, etc. Movie Supply Company, 844 South Wabash 
Avenue, Chicago. 



Equipment for Sale 



HIGH GRADE, GUARANTEED USED EQUIP- 
MENT at very reasonable prices. All makes of mo- 
tion picture machinery such as Simplex, Powers, 
Motiograph projectors. Powers high intensity arc 
lamps, compensators of all kinds, motors, and Mazda 
regulators. Also first class overhauling done on all 
kinds of motion picture equipment. An inquiry wilE 
bring a prompt quotation. It pays to investigate. Ad- 
dress Joseph Spratler. 12-14 E. 9th St., Chicago, IlL 

CHICAGO CLEARING HOUSE for Second Hand 
Equipment. Seats, Rebuilt projectors of all makes. 
Screens, Pianos, Organs and other miscellaneous 
articles for the theatre. Address Illinois Theatre 
Equipment Company, 12-14 E. 9th Street, Chicago, 
Illinois. 



"EVERYTHING FOR THE MOVIES." Guaran- 
teed Rebuilt Simplex-Powers and Motiograph Projec- 
tors, Opera Chairs — Generators — Screens, etc. Sup- 
plies and complete equipments. Lowest prices. Cash 
or easy terms. Special bulletin free. Monarch Theatre 
Supply Co., Memphis, Tenn. 



COMPLETE THEATRE EQUIPMENT including 
500 opera chairs, two Simplex Projectors, Martini 
Rotary Converter, Screeii, Ticket Selling Machine, 
Lightning Changer, Ticket Chopper, etc. Address Box 
111, Exhibitors Herald, Chicago. 



Chairs for Sale 



320 — Upholstered chairs. Every back and seat 
newly upholstered in Blue Spanish Leather. Very- 
low price and quick shipment. C. G. Demel, 845 S. 
State St., Chicago, 111. 



2,000 — Brand new veneer opera chairs, finished ire 
Gray, Mahogany and Walnut. These chairs only- 
slightly higher than used ones and are very rare bar- 
gains. Exact photo and full details submitted in first 
letter. Please state number of chairs required. C. G. 
Demel, 845 S. State St., Chicago, 111. 



FOR SALE — Used Theatre chairs, always a stock 
on hand, also veneer seats, write your requirements. 
Address Theatre Seating Co., 845 S. State St., 
Chicago, 111. 



Help Wanted 



\\''ANTED — First class mechanic and motion picture 
equipment repair man, thoroughly experienced ot» 
Simplex, Powers and Motiograph. Good salary, splen- 
did position and wonderful opportunity for right 
party. References required. Address Box 231, Ex- 
hibitors Herald, 407 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



79 




WHAT THE PICTURE DID FOR ME 

Verdicts on Films in Language of Exhibitor 



Incorporated in this original exhibitors report department of Exhibitors Herald, which was estab- 
lished October 14, 1916, is the Moving Picture World department, "Straight from the Shoulder 

Reports." 



Columbia 

ALIAS THE LONE WOLF: Special cast— 90%. A 
real good picture. Is sure to please. Six reels. — 
Earl Somerville, Opera House theatre, Raymond, 
Minn. — General patronage. 

FORGOTTEN WOMEN: Conrad Nagel— A good 
picture of the South Sea Isles. Is sure to pleajse. 
Six reels. — ^Earl Somerville, Opera House theatre, 
Eaymond, Minn. — General patronage. 

FBO 

THE MOJAVE KID: Bob Steele— 70%. December 

17. Very good Western. Will please for Saturday 
night. Plenty of action and suispense and the scenery 
is also wonderful. Fine print from Boston. Five 
reels. — G. B. Orne, Richmond theatre, Richmond, Vt. 
— ^General patronage. 

THE MOJAVE KID: Bob Steel^December 10. 
This is my first picture of this star, and it was 
20od. Had a pretty good crowd. Five reels. — Andrew 
Eapp, Theatoriura theatre, Emlenton, Pa. — General 
patronage. 

MOON OF ISRAEL: Special cast— Very 
good production. Elaborate settings. Fair 
acting. Pleased the patrons. — Mrs. J. B. 
Travelle, Elite theatre, Placervillc, Cal. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

RANGER OF THE NORTH: Ranger, the Dog— 
95%. December 2. My patrons just went wild over 
this one. They told me plenty that this was one of 
the best dog pictures that they ever saw, and I think 
myself that it is very, very good. A lot of them 
asked me when I was going to have another one, 
and I told them that I had four more and the kids 
just shouted. Six reels. — C. Gehlsen, Community 
theatre, Burk, S. D. — Small town patronage. 

THE TERROR OF BAR X: Bob Custer— 30%. 
Becember 17. A fair action picture. Scraps and lots 
of them. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville, Mich. — General patronage. 

THE FIGHTING HOMBRE: Bob Custer— 
A real good Western and went over very good 
to small houses for two nights. Made a lit- 
tle money. — W. C. Snyder, Cozy theatre. La- 
ment, Okla. — General patronage. 



Editor's Note 

Percentage ratings given by ex- 
hibitors in reports to this depart- 
ment are obtained in the following 
manner: Average daily gross of 
picture reported is divided by 
average daily gross of picture hold- 
ing house record to determine rela- 
tive box office value in terms of 
percentage. 

EXAMPLE: $75 (average daily 
gross of picture reported) divided 
by $100 (average daily gross of 
picture holding house record) 
equals .75 (percentage rating given 
picture in report). 

When a picture has received 
percentage ratings in 10 reports it 
is entered in THE BOX OFFICE 
TICKER with its current gross 
average indicating relative attrac- 
tion values of pictures listed there- 
in. 

THE BOX OFFICE TICKER 
appears on page 89. 



CLANCY'S KOSHER WEDDING: George Sidney 
— 30%. December 18. This is a good picture. Chuck 
full of laughs. Six reels. — A. G. Witwer, Grand 
theatre. Rainier, Ore. — ^General patronage. 

THE BANDIT'S SON: Bob Steele— 80%. October 
29. Tom Mix better look out or this boy will get 
ahead of him as he sure has the action. My patrons 
sure smiled. When they went out a lot of them asked 
me if there were going to be any more of them and 
a lot said, more like this big boy, then we will be 



back. Five reels. — C. Gehlsen, Community theatre, 
Burk, S. D. — Small town patronage. 

SOUTH SEA LOVE: Patsy Ruth Miller— 85%. 
December 17. This is a dandy little picture and 
pleased my patrons. Plenty of good comments. 
FBO sure has the pictures for the small towns in 
their 1927-28 line up. Seven reels. — C. Gehlsen, Com- 
munity theatre, Burk, S. D.— <Small town patronage. 
TARZAN AND THE GOLDEN LION: 
Special Cast — I advise any exhibitor to book 
this picture. I think it is as good a picture 
for the money as money can buy. Fine for a 
special. — M. H. Haymans, Dreamland theatre. 
Metier, Ga. — General patronage. 
THE GINGHAM GIRL: Special cas1^95%. No- 
vember 11. Saw some write up on this one that said 
just so much film, but this fellow must have been 
asleep when he ran it, as this one is very good. 
Had a lot of people that I never had before and got 
plenty of good comments on it. In fact, I got a 
lot of mouth-to-mouth advertising after the first 
show, so can't kick. In fact, I have not had a poor 
one from FBO on their 1927-28 line up. Seven 
reels. — ^C. Gehlsen, Community theatre, Burk, S. D. — 
Small town patronage. 

CYCLONE OF THE RANGE: Tom Tyler 
— A pleasing but poor picture. — Mrs. J. B. 
Travelle, Elite theatre, Placcrville, Cal. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

LONE HAND SAUNDERS: Fred Thomson 
— This is a good Western. Play it if you use 
Westerns. Some real thrills but someone has 
bum ideas as to the registering of a 38 or 45 
bullet on striking a metal disk, no considera- 
tion is taken of concussion. I believe I know 
now who sends Bud Fisher his ideas for Mutt 
and JefT's Bullet Proof vests. — L. L, Like, 
Dreamland theatre, Drummond, Mont. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 
BREED OF THE SEA: Ralph Ince— 80%. Decem- 
ber 5-6. A very good picture of the sea, spiced 
of the like of the South Sea Islands. A story of 
brothers, one a pirate the other a missionary. Mar- 
garet Livingston does some dandy woi-k in this pic- 
ture. FBO seems to have some pretty good stuff 
this year. Seven reels. — W. R. Bratton, Stella thea- 
tre, Council Grove, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

SMOOTH AS SATIN: Evelyn Brent— 25%. De- 
cember 13. This is an extra good program picture. 



You Join the "Herald Family" 

A hearty welcome to Van's Gang of Moving Picture World. It is the hope of the "Herald Family" that 
every member of Vans Gang finds in this department, and in the reports of members of the "Herald Family," 
the same sincerity of purpose, the same unbiased reports, which made "Straight from the Shoulder Reports" 
a department of inestimable value to the exhibitor. "What the Picture Did for Me" is conduced by the exhibi- 
tor for the exhibitor. May the members of Vans Gang remain with us for years to come. That is the New Year 
ivish of this department. 



80 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



Good crook story. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

SILVER COMES THROUGH: Fred Thomson— 
75%. December 24. Like all the rest of this star's 
pictures all extra good. This is the last one of 
F B O'e program. All good. Not one flop — some 
record. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville, Mich. — General patronage. 

THE TOUGH GUY: Fred Thomson— This 
is, or was, a good Western, but my print vfas 
bad and for some reason it did not pull for 
me. Personally I like Fred Thomson and his 
horse. — H. W. Batchelder, Gait theatre. Gait, 
Cal. — General patronage. 

KOSHER KITTY KELLY: Viola Dana— A 
string of muck. More unfavorable comments 
on this than anything I have shown for a long 
time. If one producer makes something good 
in one line the rest try to follow suit and 
make a mess of it. — D. A. Rhyner, Rialto the- 
atre, Hebron, N. D. — General patronage. 
MOULDERS OF MEN: Conway Tearle— 90%. No- 
vember 28-29. A powerful drama of the underworld 
that every one should see. Although Conway Tearle 
is getting rather old he does this kind of a role to 
perfection. The work of Frank Darro should make 
him a star. He has Jackie Coogian beat, and I 
thought Jackie was a darn good actor. If you haven't 
played F B O get wise and play some good pictures. 
This is just one of the Bell Ringers. Seven reels. — 
W. R. Bratton, Stella theatre. Council Grove, Kan. — 
Small town patronage. 

ARIZONA NIGHTS: Fred Thomson— The more 
this star makes the poorer they seem to get. Only 
one more and then I will be done with him. Seven 
reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, III. — 
General patronage. 

CYCLONE OF THE RANGE: Tom Tyler— Decem- 
ber 10. A nice little Tyler picture for Saturday night. 
Five reels. — Wm. E. Tragsdorf, Trags theatre, Neills- 
ville, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

SLING SHOT KID: Buzz Barton— December 23-24. 
Good Western. Buzz is a comer. Kids are strong 
for him. Ran this as half of a double feature pro- 
gram. Used Douglas MacLean in "Let It Rain" as 
the other half. It's a big laugh producer. Business 



light. Five reels. — E. M. Biddle, Strand theatre. 
Paoli, Ind. — Small town patronage. 

THE COWBOY COP: Tom Tyler— It's good for a 
Sunday show, but only about 100 feet of it is West- 
ern. Six reels. — ^J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, 
Breese, 111. — ^General patronage. 

First National 

THE GORILLA: Charles Murray— 80%. December 
13-14. Good picture. Pleased and seemed to give 
a title that I could work with even among those 
that knew nothing of the stage play. Did nice busi- 
ness, and for once I made money on a First National 
special. — C. S. McLellan, Rex theatre. Eagle Lake, 
Tex. — Small town patronage. 

THE GORILLA: Charles Murray— 5%. December 
23-24. For me this proved to be the biggest flop of 
any pictui-e I ever played. The worst of it was that 
it didn't please 25 per cent of the people that did 
see it. I have played three First National specials 
and all have lost money and drew less than their 
regular program pictures. The title on this keeps 
people away. They all think it is a wild animal 
show. Seven reels. — H. J. Eagan, American theatre, 
Wautoma, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

THE DROP KICK: Richard Barthelmess— 15%. 
December 19. Not so good as some other football 
pictures we have had, and didn't click so well, either. 
Seven reels. — A. G. Witwer, Grand theatre. Rainier, 
Ore. — General patronage. 

THE MAKING OF O'MALLEY: Milton 
Sills — Good show. Pleased all who saw it. 
Good picture for mining town of 1,000. — L. E. 
Pamell, Auditorium, Piper, Ala. — General pat- 
ronage. 

HARD BOILED HAGGERTY: Milton Sills— 16%. 
December 14. All our patrons seemed to like this 
one. School play cut attendance. Eight reels.^ — 
A. G. Witwer, Grand theatre. Rainier, Ore. — General 
patronage. 

MAN CRAZY: Special cast— 25%. A nice little 
story, interesting and entertaining. Will please the 
women more than men patrons. Seven reels. — H. J. 
Bagan, American theatre, Wautoma, Wis. — Small 
town patronage. 



SEE YOU IN JAIL: Jack Mulhall— 50%. De- 
cember 23. Good farce comedy. Satisfied as a pro- 
gram picture. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

SEE YOU IN JAIL: Jack Mulhall— December 
18-19. A good little program picture. When I saw 
this in the Oriental in Chi. I thought it was good, 
and still think so. If it had kept up the pace shown, 
in the first reei, it would have been a knockout. 
Seven reels. — Wm. E. Tragsdorf, Trags theatre^ 
Neillsville, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

STEPPING ALONG: Johnny Hines— 75%. Decem- 
ber 24. This was good, like all the Hines comedies- 
For my part I think he is much better than Harold 
Lloyd. Hines comedy is natural and Lloyd's is 
merely silly. We ran this on Christmas Eve. 
Started the show after the Christmas trees and had 
a pretty good crowd. Eight reels. — Robert K. 
Yancey, Bonny theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — General xiat- 
ronage. 

STEPPING ALONG: Johnny Hines— Very good if 
you like Hines. Seven reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand 
theatre, Breese, 111. — General patronage. 

NAUGHTY BUT NICE: Colleen Moore— 50%. De- 
cember 25-26. This is a good picture. I don't call 
it the best of Colleen Moore's pictures but, as always, 
the star fine and cast good. Lots of comedy, gave 
satisfaction. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
(Jreenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

SUBWAY SADIE: Special cast— 62%. Here is a 
fine, modern, every-day street life New York City 
love story, with fine scenes beautifully produced 
and a dandy vein of fun running through it. Jack 
Mulhall and Dorothy Mackaill at their best. Clean, 
enjoyable. Subway smashup good. View of big 
liner interesting, fine ending. We put it on our 
best nights to pleased house. This is not a rip- 
roaring comedy, but a pleasing love story. You 
will enjoy it. Excellent fashion show in it, book 
it. Use the Victor record "Molly Malone" for 
love theme and the new organ record "Dancing Tam- 
bourine" for subway shots. P. S. — Forgot to say 
that Charlie Murray as the taxi driver furnishes 
real comedy. — Philip Rand. Rex theatre, Salmon, 
Idaho. — General patronage. 

THE SUNSET DERBY: William Collier, Jr.— 
25%. December 15. A good racing storj-. They are 
all like this — just like the rest. — Bert Silver, Silver 
Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patron- 
age. 

SYNCOPATING SUE: Corinne Griffith— 40%. A 
good picture, finely made, splendid scenes. Tom 
Moore is good. Not a jazzy picture, nor big, but 
pleasing. Corinne is stage struck and nearly falls 
for the villain, the producer, but then Tom Moore 
as the trap drummer wins her in the end. Should 
go well where Miss Griffith is liked. — Philip Rand, 
Rex theatre, Salmon, Idaho. — General patronage. 

CAMILLE: Norma Talmadge — For the women 
folks. Wonderful acting. Will go good where high- 
class pictures are appreciated. — A. G. Miller, Lyric 
theatre, Atkinson, Neb. — General patronage. 

THE LIFE OF RILEY: Special cast— December 
18-19. Pleased a Sunday night crowd in fine shape. 
Have the projectionist hurry the fire scenes a little, 
or they might drag. Seven reels. — John L. Danm, 
Strand theatre, Wadsworth, O. — General patronage. 

THE CRYSTAL CUP: Special cast— "Crystal Cup" 
does not mean anything from a box office standpoint, 
as the story from which it was taken is not known 
to any great extent, but it is a 100 per cent picture 
from the production angle. Story sustains pretty 
well. However, character by Dorothy Mackaill is 
over-drawn to such an extent that it becomes tire- 
some, but in the end you are well repaid for having 
sat through the picture as she (Dorothy) makes up 
for all lost time. Good picture and will stand boost- 
ing quite some. Seven reels. — W. H. Brenner, Cozy 
theatre, Winchester, Ind. — General patronage. 

VALLEY OF THE GIANTS: Milton Sills— Decem- 
ber 21-22. A very good Sills picture. Pleased those 
who were here. Blame the week before Christmas 
for poor business, as nothing is doing anywhere this 




trailers Sell Seah 




NATIONAL SCREEN SERVICE!^ 

IDishibukd throughout Ihe United Siaies from 
CHICAGO NEW YORK LOS ANGELES 

845 S.Wabash Ave. - 126-130 W.46'* St. - 1922 S.Vermonl Ave. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



81 



J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum 



TUCSON, ARIZ., Christmas, 1927. 

DEAR HERALD: 

We're here. Marie and I arrived here last evening, and after a formal introduction to 
the family I v\ras handed a Christmas package in the form of a telegram from my home 
town of Neligh advising me that our home was burned to the ground last Monday with 
practically all the contents. Lovely start for a "Merry Christmas." 

If you have never experienced the sensation of having the accumulations of years go up 
in smoke, don't do it, if you must do it don't do it at Christmas time, pick some other 
season. 

From what meager advice we have they saved the piano but I am not informed whether 
they saved my golf and fishing outfit or not, but then this is Christmas, so why let a little 
thing like that spoil the occasion, therefore — 

Let's forget those things that make us worry, 
Let's forget those things that make us blue. 

— and after having relieved ourself of the foregoing, let's turn our attention to something 
more in keeping with the occasion, with the hope that each and tvery one of you enjoyed 
a most joyous Christmas and that the New Year will bring to you must of happiness and 
prosperity. 

^Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World Fills a Want None Others Can Do 

From Ft. Worth, Tex., to Tucson, Ariz., is the longest road in the world, but it is a 
wonderful scenic highway. The scenery along this route is simply magnificent in the 
extreme. It is different somewhat from the Alps in that the scenery along this road con- 
sists entirely of cactus, mesquite, sagebrush, Mexicans and hobos. The hobos are of a 
most obliging nature, as any of them will ride with you and never charge you a cent. 
If you haul one of them he will panhandle you for his feed and lodging with that air of 
self sacrifice and even condescension that would almost make one sorry he couldn't offer 
him better accommodations. 

Those going West are on their way to Los Angeles to visit a dying relative and those 
going East are trying to get back to Cleveland, O., before their sister passes away, for the 
poor girl is crying for them every day. They can put up a hardluck story that would 
wring tears out of a brass monkey, but I never shed a tear. That's the kind of a hard 
hearted wretch we are. 

We hauled one old veteran tourist for 300 miles who was on his way from Miami, Fla., 
to Los Angeles but lost him when we went into a hotel for the night. He probably didn't 
like the hotel we selected. Just out of EI Paso we picked up a young German boy. He 
reminded us so much of Eagle Eye Joe in size and looks that we just couldn't pass him up. 
He was on his way from Hamburg, Germany, to Los Angeles where he had an Uncle in 
the restaurant business. 

At Dallas, Tex., his change ran out and the poor kid was up against it. He couldn't 
hardly speak or understand a word of English but would say "Yah" or "Nine"' to about 
everything we said to him. We asked him if Hamburg was where the Hamburger sand- 
wiches came from and he replied "Yah." He had just money enough to pay for his lodg- 
ing the first night but was not going to get any breakfast. We asked him if he 
wasn't going in to breakfast and he shook his head, then we asked if he was out 
of money and he didn't seem to understand, then we said "Lonsom des gelt coom," 
and he smiled and said, "Yah," so we took him in and filled him up and then hit the 
road again. 

We struck a piece of awfully rough road and we turned to the kid and said, "Der veigh 
is schlecht, dos is vischneic dos is toonsole, hautamere gasauck," and the kid laughed. We 
don't know whether we came close to it or missed it a mile, since it has been a long time 

(Conlinued on following page) 



week. Seven reels. — John L. Damn, Strand theatre, 
Wadsworth, O. — General patronage. 

THE DEVIL'S SADDLE: Ken Maynard— A good 
Weetern story that will go over on Saturday night 
in any small town. Tarzan is fine with a number 
of new stunts. — ^E. T. Ihinlap, Dunlap theatre, 
Hawarden, la. — General patronage. 

ROSE OF THE GOLDEN WEST: Special cast- 
Mary Astor wae never sweeter than in this one, and 
Gilbert Roland did even better than in "Camille." 
He is versatile, and he should become a very popu- 
lar star. This story of old California has been done 
many times for the screen, but never better than 
this. It should please all types of patronage. Seven 
reels. — W. H. Brenner, Cozy theatre, Winchester, 
Ind.- — General patronage. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY: Billie Dove— Played on 
Chi'ietmas Eve, so can't report on its drawing power. 
Personally thought it a very thin plot, bolstered 
up by Billie Dove wearing a lot of pretty clothes in 
some scenes and not so many in other scenes. 
Would only class it as a program picture. Not for 
family nights. Six reels. — P. G. Vaughan, Sun 
theatre, Kansas City, Mo. — ^Neighborhood patronage. 

PARADISE: Milton Sills— VeiT good entertain- 
ment. Eight reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, 
Breese, 111. — General patronage. 

PALS FIRST: Special cas(>— Very good. Seven 
reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — 
General patronage. 

LONG PANTS: Harry Langdon— If you like this 
star the picture will please them. Not much to it. 
Seven reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 
III. — General patronage. 

ALL ABOARD: Johnny Hines— Very good if 
Hines goes good for you. One bath room scene 
should be cut off. Seven reels. — J. W. Schmidt, 
Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — General patronage. 

THE SEA TIGER: Milton Sills— December 17. 
Here is a dandy. It has everything, action, romance 
and thrills. Sills is good and Mary Astor is sweet. 
We don't get as good prints out of St. Louis as we 
did from Kansas City. Six reels. — Robert K. Yancey, 
Bonny theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — General patronage. 

SMILE, BROTHER, SMILE: Special cast— Very 
good picture for any night. Lots of comedy and that 
is what they like here. — W. L. Crouse, Ideal theatre, 
Bloomer, Wis. — General patronage. 

SOMEWHERE IN SONORA: Ken Maynard-^ 
This is very good. Seven reels. — J. W. Schmidt, 
Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — General jiatronage. 

THE POOR NUT: Jack Mulhall— December 16-17. 

A very satisfactory offering for any type of house. 
Business light but no fault of picture.- Book it. — 
Robert P. Doyle, Academy theatre, Nunda, N. Y. — 
Small town patronage. 

VENUS OF VENICE: Constance Talmadge— De- 
cember 11-12. Good program picture. If your fans 
like Connie they will like this one. Seven reels. — 
Wm. E. Tragsdorf, Trags theatre, Neillsville, Wis. — 
Small town patronage. 

THE GREATER GLORY: Anna Q. Nilsson— De- 
cember 13. A wonderful picture. Miss Nilsson does 
some good acting in this one. Didn't have much of 
a crowd. However, no fault of the picture. Nine 
reels. — ^Andrew Rapp, Theatorium theatre, Emlenton, 
Pa. — General patronage. 



Fox 

VERY CONFIDENTIAL: Madge Bellamy— 75%. 
November 30. Ran this with a 45 minute revue and 
it made excellent entertainment. An amusing little 
comedy of sporting life and two poor working girls. 
This has some funny titles and a good auto race in 
it. With the aid of a good comedy it ought to get 
by one night. Six reels.— W. K. Bratton, Stella 
theatre. Council Grove, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

TWO GIRLS WANTED: Janet Gaynor— 
Just a fair picture. Supposed to be comedy, 
but nothing much. Print good. Appeal 30 per 
cent. Drew all classes. Population 1,200. — 
L. W. Bagwell, Crystal theatre, Oakman, Ala. 
— General patronage. 

THE MUSIC MASTER: Alec B. Francis- 
Here is a beautiful picture, but I had the 
smallest crowd of the year. Took in $7.50 and 
I certainly hate to see a picture of this calibre 
passed up. — H. L. Bouhn, Grande theatre. Port 
Allegany, Pa. — General patronage. 

LOVES OF CARMEN: Special cast— 27%. De- 
cember 16. A well produced "Carmen." It's big 
and "hot." Failed to do the business here and 
pleased about 50 per cent of those who came. Nine 
reels. — A. G. Witwer, Grand theatre. Rainier, ©re. — 
General patronage. 



THE DIXIE MERCHANT: Special cast— 45%. I 
didn't see it but comments very good. All said it 
was a fine Southern picture with good trotting race 
and extra fine cast. Jack Mulhall and Madge Bel- 
lamy are in it. Evidently one of Fox's good ones and 
Fox doesn't seem to have many good ones at that, 
outside of Mix. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, 
Idaho. — General patronage. 

RICH BUT HONEST: Special cast— 12%. De- 
cember 20. The poor title kept them away but those 
who came were well pleased. A dandy picture with 
lots of comedy furnished by McNamara. Kept audi- 
ence laughing. Lots of action, comedy and spice. 
Will appeal to the sheiks and flappers. Seven reels. 
— R. Pfeiffer, Princess theatre, Chilton, Wis. — Small 
town patronage. 

ANKLES PREFERRED: Madge Bellamy— This 
went very good and is very entertaining. Seven 
reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — 
General patronage. 

DESERT VALLEY : Buck Jones— December 17. 
Pretty good Buck picture. More comedy than Buck 
puts in most of his. Pleased the majority of his 
fans. Six reels. — ^Wm. E. Tragsdorf, Trags theatre, 
Neillsville, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

THE BLUE EAGLE: George O'Brien — A 
splendid picture. Good direction. Should 
please any audience. Plenty of action. — Mrs. 
J. B. Travelle, Elite theatre, Placerville, Cal. 
— General patronage. 

A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING 



ARTHUR'S COURT: Special cast— This fea- 
ture is so old that some of the youngsters 
thought it new and wc were getting it before 
Syracuse. It is a dandy picture and well 
worth running. — L. E. Parsons, Parsons Hall, 
Marcellus, N. Y. — General patronage. 

DESERT VALLEY: Buck Jones— Good.— J. W. 
Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — General pat- 
ronage. 

DESERT VALLEY: Buck Jones— A typical Buck 
picture. Pleased his fans. Five reels. — -Wm. E. 
Tragsdorf, Trags theatre, Neillsville, Wis. — Small 
town patronage. 

CANYON OF LIGHT: Tom Mix— Tom does too 
much of the impossible stuff but they are never poor. 
Six reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 
III. — General patronage. 



Gotham 

THE BLOCK SIGNAL: Ralph Lewis— 10%. ^. 
cember 15. Nice little railroad story that pleased the 
average. Six reels. — G. B. Orne, Richmond theatre, 
Richmond, Vt. — General patronage. 

HIS MASTER'S VOICE: Special cast— This is a 
good dog picture and a pup in it that looks won- 
derful. Six reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, 
Breese, III. — General patronage. 



82 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum 



(Continued from preceding page) 

since we have had occasion to try it, but the kid cut loose on a line of Dutch that would 
have made the Kaiser sorry he went to Holland. 

When he got out of the car at Tucson we handed him a couple of bucks and wished him 
a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year and he smiled and said, "Donkashaen," and we 
are not just sure whether he meant, "Thank you, sir," or, "You are easy," and it doesn't 
make any difference. He was stranded, and at Christmas time, in a strange country, and 
we wouldn't have felt much like a man if we hadn't done it. What if Marie had hit a rock 
and bust a hole in a perfectly good casing that you could stick Crocket Brown's BuUfound- 
land pup in, what if our home did burn, this is Christmas and this is the day that "Unto 
us a child is born, and unto us a Savior given," and a little practice of the Golden Rule is 
good for any of us and makes of us better men and better women. 

But speaking of holes in tires. You can see more people changing tires and pumping 
'em up in 10 miles of this highway than you would see on Michigan avenue in 10 years. 
Every garage one passes one can see a fellow standing outside with tire patches in his 
hand and he is disappointed if you don't drive in. It is 60 miles from Deming, N. M., to 
Lorville, and Marie made it in nothing flat. That is, we had a flat before we started and 
another after we got there. 

It seems funny about these flat tires, out in this country. They are always flat on the 
under side, must be something about this dry air that makes it. If some guy would 
invent a tire that the flat part would always be on the top side his fortune would be 
made. After Frank O'Hara gets his system of mirrors made for seeing cars coming around 
the bend in the road he will probably tackle this tire problem, and he and George Bungle 
can make 'em if anybody can. 

Everybody down here has a goat. Some have 30 or 40, and so, to be right in style, my 
wife bought one, a regular Nannie. She's a beautiful goat and she's a warbler, she 
warbles from sunup to sundown. 

Nannie^ seems to be a little off her feed today, but that is probably because she ate 
three oyster cans and a roll of barbed wire for supper last night. Geneve says she hopes 
she doesn't get the habit of eating tar paper for she is afraid it will taint the milk. If 
Nannie starts warbling at sunrise tomorrow morning we are going to try her on one of 
Marie's punctured tires. Geneve says she always knew that Nannie had good judgment 
and that she proved it the other day when they ran out of tin cans, for she fed her an 
edition of EXHIBITORS HERALD and she seemed to relish it, especially SERVICE 
TALKS, but when she came to our "Colyum" she — Well, maybe its better that I d3n't tell 
you what she did. 

Exhibitors Herald and Moving I'icture World Fills a Want None Others Can 1)0 

We expected to cover Texas, Arizona and New Mexico after the holidays but afier get- 
ting that Christmas package from Neligh it may necessitate a change in our plans. We 
may head North, but then if there is nothing left up there but ashes what's the use. There 
is 60 degrees difference in the climate in favor of Arizona. 

Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World Fills a Want None Others Can Do 

We hope Jay will excuse us for making this letter shorter than usual, and we believe he 
will, for when one is filled up on turkey and cranberry sauce, dill pickles 'en everything 
and thoughts of what was once a home, he is not in the best mood to write much of 
interest, therefore, we again extend our best wishes to one and all for the coming New Year. 

/. C. JENKINS, 
The HERALD man. 

Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World Fills a Want None Others Can Do 



Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

ANNIE LAURIE: Lillian Gish— 50%. December 

19. In eiiite of the fact that this picture is not 
going so big in the first runs, the small towns should 
not be afraid of it. It pulled very well on a bad 
stormy night and it will please as I would not ask for 
a better picture to come into my theatre. It carries 
the special stamp all the way through and can be 
bought right. Another matter that I wish to mention 
is the extra fine condition of the reels Metro is 
putting their new product onto. It is a shame, some 
of the old worn out reels that we get from the other 
companies with a brand new film on them and it is 
almost an impossibility to rewind some of them 
without injuring the side of the print. We keep 
a set of reels in the booth and believe me, we have 
plenty of need to use them. Compliments to Metro. 
Others take notice. Nine reels. — G. B. Orne, Rich- 
mond theatre, Richmond, Vt. — General patronage. 

AFTER MIDNIGHT: Norma Shearer— 75%. De- 
cember 18-19. A good picture. Drew good on Sun- 
day but poor on Monday. Pleaaed everybody. Seven 
reels. — R. Pfeiffei-, Pi-incess theatre, Chilton, Wis. — 
Small town i>atronage. 

THE BIG PARADE: Gilbert-Adoree— Big 
in everything but the profits. Had a big crowd, 
took in b;g money, had big praise, did big 
advertising and gave Mctro-Goldwyn big 
money. — H. L. Bouhn, Grande theatre, Port 
Alkgany, Pa. — General patronage. 
BEN HUR: Ramon Novarro — Is much better pic- 
ture than "The Big Parade." I did more business 
and not as good dates. Had Sunday, Monday and 
Tuesday with "The Big Parade" last three days. It's 



the greatest and best picture I ever played in my 
theatre. — Adpheus GofRnet, Pastime theatre, Rittman, 
O. — General patronage. 

BEN HUR: Special cast— October 15-16-17. Bet- 
ter than "The Big Parade." Greatest picture ever 
shown on screen. Made good money on this one and 
gave my patrons more than expected. Every night 
got better. Good for the whole family. Got the 
ministers out this time and liked it. Twelve reels. — 
J. G. Fair, Elite theatre, Laurens, la. — General pat- 
ronage. 

AFTER MIDNIGHT: Norma Shearer— Very 
good acting with a moral. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, 
Elite theatre, Placerville, Cal. — General pat- 
ronage. 

THE BIG PARADE: John Gilbert— December 14- 

15- 16. This is a good picture but it is too long and 
high priced for a small town. Didn't make anything 
on account of having to pay so much for it. Thirteen 
reels. — Andrew Rapp, Theatorium theatre, Emlenton, 
Pa. — General patronage. 

THE BIG PARADE: Renee Adoree — Great picture. 
Will make small exhibitor money if he can buy it 
right. It certainly is big. Comedy keeps the audi- 
ence in an uproar all the time. Twelve reels. — 
Adpheus Goflfinet, Pastime theatre, Rittman, O. — 
General patronage. 

THE BIG PARADE: John Gilbert — September 15- 

16- 17. Big picture. Play it. Broke all house records 
to date. Twelve reels. — J. G. Fair, Elite theatre, 
Laurens, la. — ^General patronage. 

FRISCO SALLY LEW: Sally O'Neil— December 
20-21. A good picture. Very suitable for showing 
St. Patrick's Day or at Christmas season. Lots of 
comedy and pleased the few who saw it. — Robert P. 



Doyle, Academy theatre, Nunda, N. Y. — Small town 
patronage. 

TWELVE MILES OUT: John Gilbert- December 
13-14. I thought the picture fair but the judges 
didn't. I should have drawn the shade on office 
window and stayed inside. Instead I went out and 
took a real i-azzing in as graceful a manner as pos- 
sible. Fair business but did not please. — Robei-t P. 
Doyle, Academy theatre, Nunda, N. Y. — Small town 
patronage. 

ROOKIES: Special cast — December 17. Here is 
a good comedy drama suitable for any theatre. It is 
funny from stai-t to finish. Some said they liked it 
better than "The Big Parade." Karl Dane and 
George K. Arthur make a good comedy team. Seven 
reels. — Andrew Rapp, Theatorium theatre, Emlenton, 
Pa. — General patronage. 

HEAVEN ON EARTH: Special cast— A 
good picture. Our patrons received this one 
well, though the ending was not so good. 
Tone okey and good for Sunday. No, for 
special. — C. G. Brothers, Grand theatre. Grand 
River, la, — General patronage. 

CALIFORNIA: Tim McCoy— Did not do 
the business on this one, although the picture 
is a dandy. If could only tell them what was 
in the picture it would go over. Poor draw- 
ing title. — Ray P. Murphy, Old Trail theatre, 
Hebron, Ohio. — General patronage. 

ROOKIES: Karl Dane— This one's a scream. 
Needs unique advertising to put it over. — A. G. 
Miller, Lyric theatre, Atkinson, Neb. — General pat- 
ronage. 

THE FLAMING FOREST: Special cast— Good 
Northwest story. Good scenery. — Ernest Vetter, Ma- 
jestic theatre. Homer, Mich. — General patronage. 

SPOILERS OF THE WEST: Tim McCoy— Decem- 
ber 16-17. This Tim McCoy might be all right if he 
had stories that would interest people but after the 
first few they haven't been worth much. Played them 
all last year and two this year and it's going to be 
quite a while before we play another one. Six reels. 
• — ^John L. Damn, Strand theatre, Wadsworth, O. — 
General patronage. 

MOCKERY: Lon Chaney— Wonderful act- 
ing, but can't put Chancy across in our com- 
munity. Lost money on show. Farming com- 
munity. — R. W. Hcmpstone, Waverly Hall the- 
atre, Poolesvillc, Md. — Small town patronage. 

MR. WU: Lon Chaney— Most of Lon 
Chancy's draw, but failed to make rental on 
this one. It went over my patrons' heads. 
Ended too abruptly. Not the thing for a small 
town, as there is no action, just acting. 
Usually small towns must have action. — H. B. 
Gibson, Gibson theatre, Burnsville, W. Va — 
General patronage. 

VALLEY OF HELL: Special cast— Nothing to 
this one. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Bieese, III. 
— General patronage. 

TILLIE THE TOILER: Marion Davies— This pic- 
ture will please and di'aw a record attendance any- 
where, but it's very light. Weat'ner coldest in years 
So no business. — A. G. Miller, Lyric theatre, Atkin- 
son, Neb. — General patronage. 

THE UNKNOWN: Lon Chaney— December 9-10. 
Excellent. It will keep them interested every minute. 
Chaney a wonderful actor but no drawing power 
here. — Robert P. Doyle, Academy theatre, Nunda, 
N. Y. — Small town patronage. 

THE AUCTION BLOCK: Special cast— It's good. 
Eight reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 
111. — General patronage. 

THE UNDERSTANDING HEART: Special cast- 
December 4-5. Very good outdoor picture, but story 
did not follow book very closely. — Ernest Vettei-, 
Majestic theatre, Homer, Mich. — General patronage. 

MAN OF THE FOREST: Jack Holt— December 
9-10. Very good Western. The readers of the book 
kicked about it not following. — Ernest Vetter, Majestic 
theatre, Homer, Mich. — General patronage. 

THE MASKED BRIDE: Mae Murray— Good. Seven 
reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. 
— General patronage. 

LIGHTS OF OLD BROADWAY: Marion Davies 
— It's good. Seven reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand the- 
atre, Breese, III. — General patronage. 



Paramount 

THE GAY DEFENDER: Richard Dix— 75%. De- 
cember 13. Not so bad a picture, but my patrons 
would have rather seen Dix in a real American role. 
In this one he plays the part of a Spaniard and does 
it fine, and the story is very good, with plenty of 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



83 



TO MOVING PICTURE WORLD SUBSCRIBERS 

Congratulations on your entry into the great HERALD FAMILY. It's a Christmas 
present to you and to them, the value of which is beyond estimate. Unitedly let's 
move on to bigger and better things for 1928 with malice toward none and charity for 
all. The great HERALD FAMILY welcomes you into full fellowship and extends to 
you the season's greetings. The hour moves on apace. Come on; let's go. 

J. C. JENKINS, 
The HERALD Man. 



action. Seven reels. — G. B. Orne, Richmond theatre, 
Richmond, Vt. — General patronage. 

THE CITY GONE WILD: Thomas Meighan— 25%. 
December 25. One of Meighan's good ones. Interest- 
ing and entertaining all the way. Meighan in the 
role of a fighting district attorney, which seems to 
just fit his style of acting. Seven reels. — H. J. Eagan, 
American theatre, Wautoma, Wis. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

AFRAID TO LOVE: Florence Vidor— 30%. De- 
cember 20. This is a pretty good society picture. 
Has quite a bit of comedy and seemed to please 
those who came, but it didn't draw. — Robert K. 
Yancey, Bonny theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — ^General pat- 
ronage. 

FIGURES DON'T LIE: Esther Ralston— 
Worth seeing. Good program picture. — Mrs. J. 

B. Travclle, Elite theatre, Placerville, Cal 

General patronage. 

THE ROUGH RIDERS: Special cast— &8%. De- 
cember 4-5-6. Picture excellent. Drew fair due to 
picture being made near here. Patrons complaining 
of too many war pictures. This one will please due 
to variety of pulling power-love-wai-comedy, and 
some part of it is due to please everyone. Not worth 
the price I paid. — C. S. McLellan, Rex theatre. Eagle 
Lake, Tex. — Small town patronage. 

THE ROUGH RIDERS: Special cast— December 
21-22. My personal opinion is that this is a great 
piece of entei^inment, with never a dull moment 
from beginning to end. Crammed with the stuff that 
the masses like. Laughter, tears and thrills. How- 
ever, due to the fact that this was shown free here to 
60,000 people and me showing it a few days before 
Christmas, I lost plenty of money. But the picture 
is "there." Ten reels. — P. G. Vaughan, Sun theatre, 
Kansas City, Mo.— Neighborhood patronage. 

THE ROUGH RIDERS: Special cast— December 
18-19. A wonderful production. Very cold weather 
kept them away. — Ernest Vetter, Majestic theatre. 
Homer, Mich. — General patronage. 

THE TELEPHONE GIRL: Special cast- 
Just another Paramount picture, better than 
most of them at that. Paramount has forgot- 
ten how to make small town pictures. Tone, 
okey. Sunday, yes. Special, no. — Dwight 
Grist, Theaforium, Columbia Falls, Mont. — 
General patronage. 

ROOSEVELT'S ROUGH RIDERS: Special cas^- 
I consider this a wonderful picture. And don't forget 
the title. If you leave off the Roosevelt you will leave 
off your crowd. They think it is a Tom Mix or Hoot 
Gibson if you don't emphasize Teddy, and he is there, 
BO you don't mislead anyone by so advertising. — Chas. 
Lee Hyde, Grand theatre, Pierre, S. D. — General pat- 
ronage. 

BEAU GESTE: Special cast— 59%. November 
24-25. Seeing so many adverse criticisms on the 
amount of business done in small towns, I had de- 
cided this was not for me. However, I did a record 
business, even the second night, considering the fact 
that I had as opposition the first street carnival I 
have had in seven years. It surprised me the way my 
country patrons liked the picture. — C. S. McLellan, 
Rex theatre. Eagle Lake, Tex. — Small town patronage. 

ONE WOMAN TO ANOTHER: Florence Vidor— 
15%. December 20. Not much to it, either in draw- 
ing power, cast or story. No good for the small town. 
Five reels. — G. B. Orne, Richmond theatre, Richmond, 
Vt. — General patronage. 

THE MYSTERIOUS RIDER: Jack Holt— 100%. 
December 13. Boy I How it rained, but boy, how they 
came. That's nothing, what does a rain amount to 
when you have a Jack Holt in a Zane Grey Western. 
Jack, don't let them kid you about other Western 
stars, you are still far the best. The best Zane Grey 
we ever ran. Six reels. — Robert K. Yancey, Bonny 
theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — General patronage. 

ROLLED STOCKINGS: Paramount Junior Stars 
— 50%. December 14. Very good. A good clean col- 



lege story with a different twist to the story. Six 
reels. — G. B. Orne, Richmond theatre, Richmond, Vt. 
— General patronage. 

MAN POWER: Richard Dix— 40%. December 16. 

A good entertainment. The star a favorite. Same 
picture made with Wallie Reid and trucks. — Bert 
Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

MAN POWER: Richard Dix— December 24-25. 
Very good picture. — Ernest Vetter, Majestic theatre. 
Homer, Mich. — General patronage. 

TIME TO LOVE: Raymond GriflSth- 30%. De- 
cember 16. Better than the other ones from this star, 
but no one will exert themselves to see it. Five 
reels. — G. B. Orne, Richmond theatre, Richmond, Vt. 
— General patronage. 

PADLOCKED: Special cast— 50%. A beautifully 
produced picture with fine shots of cabaret dancing 
and ballet skits. Lois Moran very winsome. All cast 
fine. Stoi-y of hypocritical vice crusading father who 
drives his daughter to the reform school, weakens her 
mind, but all ends well. Story to me unpleasant, but 
patrons commented favorably on it. A strong dra- 
matic picture, use your judgment ; would suggest 
your carefully reading press sheet. A play of this 
nature and well produced goes well, I think, for a 
change. A Rex Beach book. — Philip Rand, Rex the- 
atre, Salmon, Idaho. — General patronage. 

FASHIONS FOR WOMEN: Special cast— 60%. 
Put this over by advertising it as Paramount's annual 
Fashion Show. Used rainbow cards and tied up with 
fashion show window display at leading store. Used 
the good Rotor heralds also. In the nick of time 
we found that two of the 15 models were girls for- 
merly educated in our town, eo placarded the town 
with the news of two Salmon girls appearing in the 
picture. These combined with heavy newspaper items 
such as front page story of the fashion show, local 
teasers and story of the two Finley girls, gave us a 
good crowd. We previewed the bathtub scene and 
found it to be a work of art and not indecent at all. 
Fashion show very good but not Paramount's best. 
Play very interesting. Esther Ralston mighty pretty 
and a splendid actress. Fine cast, entire satisfaction. 
— Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, Idaho.— General 
patronage. 

THE WAY OF ALL FLESH: Emil Jannings— 
95%. December 8-9. This is one of the best pictures 
I have ever seen and everyone who saw it says the 
same. Emil Jannings plays the title role to a perfec- 
tion, with good support from Phyllis Haver. Para- 
mount can well be proud of this feature. Nine reels. 
— W. R. Bratton, Stella theatre. Council Grove, Kan. 
— Small town patronage. 

THE WAY OF ALL FLESH: Emil Jannings— 
December 19. Very good story and splendid acting. 
— M. W. Mattecheck, Lark theatre, McMinnville, Ore. 
• — Small town patronage. 

SOFT CUSHIONS: Douglaa MacLean— 30%. De- 
cember 22. Just a program picture. Played one day. 
Bought for two days. Special, no. Satisfaction, 50 
per cent.— Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

THE KID BROTHER: Harold Lloyd— 15%. De- 
cember 15-16. A very good Lloyd picture, but failed 
to do anything big due to bad weather. — R. Pfeiffer, 
Princess theatre, Chilton, Wis. — Small town patron- 
age. 

THE PONY EXPRESS: Ricardo Cortez— 85%. 
December 3. Played this to a packed house and they 
all seemed to enjoy it although it is ancient history. 
The print was good. However, the photography 
seemed dark in places. This picture in my estimation 
is about three reels too long. Betty Compson is get- 
ting a little old and has long ceased to be a drawing 
card. If this had been on a week night I don't think 
it would have gone over. Ten reels. — W. R. Bratton, 
Stella theatre. Council Grove, Kan. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 



THE PONY EXPRESS: Special cast— A very good 
Western and will stand a two days run in towns 
that like Westerns. Nine reels. — J. W. Schmidt, 
Grand theatre, Breeee, 111. — General patronage. 

SHE'S A SHEIK: Bebe Daniels— This is a good 
comedy-drama and has an interesting story. Bebe 
does well and handled most of the picture alone. 
She makes an attractive sheikess and it's good enter- 
tainment. — Chas. Lee Hyde, Grand theatre, Pierre, 
S. D. — General patronage. 

NOW WE'RE IN THE AIR: Special cast— This 
is one nice show. The little lady is more attractive 
than ever and the bold bad men make some fun of 
the war. I believe the cow milking episode in this is 
the funniest thing ever put into pictures. A competi- 
tor's motion picture salesman saw this in the seat 
beside me and he cried over it. Tears of laughter 
mixed with envy. — Chas. Lee Hyde, Grand theatre, 
Pierre, S. D. — General patronage. 

NOW WE'RE IN THE AIR: Special cast— Decem- 
ber 19. For a high priced comedy it's about as rot- 
en as one could desire. Barnyard humor vulgar. Low 
and not fit for the family. Worth about $15. — M. W. 
Mattecheck, Lark theatre, McMinnville, Ore. — Small 
town patronage. 

SWIM, GIRL, SWIM: Bebe Daniels— Gertrude 
Ederle doesn't steal this picture from Bebe but she 
is certainly an addition to the attractiveness of the 
picture. It is good entertainment and my crowd liked 
it a lot. Comedy college-life theme. — Chas. Lee Hyde, 
Grand theatre, Pierre, S. D. — General patronage. 

SWIM, GIRL, SWIM: Bebe Daniels— December 
11-12. They liked this one very much. Good clean 
comedy. — Ernest Vetter, Majestic theatre. Homer, 
Mich. — General patronage. 

SWIM, GIRL, SWIM: Bebe Daniels— Nice little 
picture, which should please most of Bebe's admir- 
ers. Not as good as "Senorita," but then very few 
are. Did not draw for me, but neither has anything 
else the past few weeks, so there you are. Good 
family night picture. Six reels. — P. G. Vaughan, Sun 
theatre, Kansas City, Mo. — Neighborhood patronage. 

SHANGHAI BOUND: Richard Dix— Ran this 
Christmas Day. Consider this a poor Dix picture. 
Very few people care to see Chinese pictures. Dix 
never has meant anything at my box office, but this 
one flopped worse than ever on a holiday booking. 
Heard no comments, which in my theatre means not 
so good. Six reels. — P. G. Vaughan, Sun theatre, 
Kansas City, Mo. — Neighborhood patronage. 

SENORITA; Bebe Daniels — Very good action pic- 
ture, with lots of comedy of the Douglas Fairbanks' 
style. — Ernest Vetter, Majestic theatre. Homer, Mich. 
— General patronage. 

THE LAST OUTLAW: Gary Cooper— This is a 
good Western, and if priced at what you can buy 
the Art Acords and Bob Tylers and such, it is a 
good picture. It is nothing but a Western, however, 
and can't be sold on the same plane as the Para- 
mount Zane Greys. Of course it hasn't the personal 
appeal that the real Western stars have, as Cooper 
is just breaking in. Doesn't any one in my crowd 
remember him by his first name yet, either. — Chas. 
Lee Hyde, Grand theatre, Pierre, S. D. — General 
patronage. 

BARBED WIRE: Pola Negri — This is a fine pic- 
ture. It has a nice lesson, well told, and is inter- 
esting from start to finish. Pola has been cast in 
a fitting part. As an attraction for me she is a 
total loss, but in this picture she is given the part 
of a foreigner, and being such she can play it and 
does get by. It's a fine picture and fits nicely into 
a Sunday program. It is not too heavy to be en- 
tertainment and yet it has a real lesson. — Chas. Lee 
Hyde, Grand theatre, Pierre, S. D. — General patron- 
age. 

NEVADA: Gary Cooper— Very good for a Western 
picture. Readers of book again complain that this 



84 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



story was cut to pieces. — Ernest Vetter, Majestic 
theatre, Homer, Mich.— General patronage. 

LET'S GET MARRIED: Richard Dix— Very good 
comedy drama. Seven reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand 
theatre, Breese, 111.— General patronage. 

FIGURES DON'T UE; Esther Ralston- Decem- 
ber 21-22. Excellent comedy drama to empty seats. 
Five reels. — E. M. Biddle, Strand theatre, Paoli, Ind. 
— Small town patronage. 

TELL IT TO SWEENEY: George Bancroft— Very 
good comedy. Priced too high to make any money. 
— Ernest Vetter, Majestic theatre. Homer, Mich. — 
General patronage. 

ROUGH HOUSE ROSIE: Clara Bow— December 2-3. 
Very good comedy drama. — Ernest Vetter, Majestic 
theatre, Homer, Mich. — General patronage. 

FIREMEN SAVE MY CHILD: Special cast— De- 
cember 19. Rotten. A good two reeler and that's 
about all. No brains in this comedy team. The hook 
for them. — M, W. Mattecheck, Lark theatre, Mc- 
Minnville, Ore. — Small town patronage. 

CHILDREN OF DIVORCE: Special cast— 90%. 
December 1-2. The best Paramount in a long time 
with Clara Bow and Esther Ralston doing some 
good work. The story, however, is not the kind for 
Clara Bow in our estimation. Had a very good 
crowd and that is something. Gary Cooper deserves 
honorable mention. Seven reels. — W. R. Bratton, 
Stella theatre. Council Grove, Kan. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

FASCINATING YOUTH: Charles (Buddy) Rogei-e 
— 90%. December 7. Charles Rogers is the star in 
this picture and does some good work. Although the 
story is good it is weak in parts. Buddy is from 
Kansas and not far from here. Let's have a photo. 
Buddy. — W. R. Bratton, Stella theatre. Council Grove, 
Kan. — Small town patronage. 

RUNNING WILD: W. C. Fields— Here is one of 
the worst yet, and whoever told Fields that this was 
entertainment was surely a blind person. Too silly 
even for children, and the adults held their noses on 
leaving the theatre. Am surprised that Paramount 
would even let this one be released under their name 
and they tell you that their product for this year is 
much better than they ever put out before. It's all 
old bull in a new way, that's all. — R. A. Shobe. 
Strand theatre, Monticello, Ind. — General patronage. 

SON OF HIS FATHER: Special cast— Very good. 
Eight reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 
111. — General patronage. 

Pathe-P D C 

A HARP IN HOCK: Joseph Schildkraut— 41%. 
December 15-16. Would have pleased, I guess, if I 
could have gotten them here. Title means nothing 
to my patrons. Schildraut seems to mean less even 
with such pictures to his credit and personally I like 
him. Producers have made few money makers for 
me this year. — ^C. S. McLellan, Rex theatre. Eagle 
Lake, Tex. — Small town patronage. 

A TURKISH DELIGHT: Special cast— 20%. De- 
cember 20. A lot of good talent and work lost. 
Why waste it. Satisfied 20 per cent. — Bert Silver, 
Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General pat- 
ronage. 

GETTING GERTIE'S GARTER: Marie Prevost— 
35%. December 14. A very good comedy drama with 
something doing every minute. Drew well for Wed- 
nesday. Seven reels. — R. Pfeiffer, Princess theatre, 
Chilton, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

THE DEVIL HORSE: Rex— Better than some of 
his previous pictures. Business fair. — Ernest Vetter, 
Majestic theatre. Homer, Mich. — Small town patron- 
age. 

Tiffany 

COLLEGE DAYS; Special east— This was an en- 
tertaining picture, also a good buy. Had everything 
and had I seen it before I booked it I certainly 
would have used it for a two-day booking. Another 
example of judging a picture by the price you paid 
for it and not being able to find out how good a 



picture it is until you actually run it. My Saturday 
crowd liked this a lot. — Chas. Lee Hyde, Grand thea- 
tre, Pierre, S. D.— General patronage. 

THE ENCHANTED ISLAND: Special cast— This 
is a picture with a new girl star who seems to be 
quite a lion tamer. Literally she sure handles a flock 
of wild animals in this production and they add a 
novel interest to a good story and a nice picture. — 
Chas. Lee Hyde, Grand theatre, Pierre, S. D.— 
General patronage. 

United Artists 

THE GENERAL: Buster Keaton— 75%. A dandy 
comedy, something different from the usual funny 
ones. Seven reels. — Minnie M. Sohnoor, Paramount 
theatre, Stapleton, Neb. — General patronage. 

LITTLE ANNIE ROONEY: Mary Pickford— 50%. 
Would have been good if they had shipped ub a 
decent print. The one we got was worn out. Nine 
reels. — Minnie Schnoor, Paramount theatre. Staple- 
ton, Neb. — General patronage. 

A NIGHT OF LOVE: Special cast— Prob- 
ably a good picture for big houses, but no 
drawing power here. Did less than one-third 
of the rental price. — H. V. Ritter, McDonald 
theatre, McDonald, Kan. — General patronage. 

THE BAT: Lousie Fazenda— 90%. A mystery 
picture that stands out as a real money maker. The 
book is well known. Seven reels. — Minnie Schnoor, 
Paramount theatre, Stapleton, Neb. — General pat- 
ronage. 

THE ONLY WAY: Martin Harvey— 40%. A very 
good picture taken from the story, "The Tale of Two 
Cities," by Charles Dickens. Seven reels. — ^Minnie 
M. Schnoor, Paramount theatre, Stapleton, Neb. — 
General patronage. 

COLLEGE: Buster Keaton— December 19. A very 
good comedy. About the best Keaton has made. — 
M. W. Mattecheck, Lark theatre, McMinnville, Ore. 
— Small town patronage. 

Universal 

DENVER DUDE: Hoot Gibson— 55%. One of 
those Western comedy affairs that seem to go well 
these days. Everybody laughed and enjoyed it. Hoot 
gets action into it at the end. Think it is a good, 
very good picture. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Sal- 
mon, Idaho. — General patronage. 

THE COHENS AND KELLYS: Special cast— 
90%. December 12. Old but mighty good. Packed 
them more than I have for a long time and pleased 
as near 100 per cent as anything can. Beautiful 
print also from Boston. If any haven't played this 
you are passing up something, because it can be 
bought right and will sure go over. Eight reels. — 
G. B. Orne, Richmond theatre, Richmond, Vt. — ^Gen- 
eral patronage. 

THE IRRESISTIBLE LOVER: Special cast 
— Nothing to this, but they'll like it just the 
same. Universal pictures consistently good. — 
Dwight Grist, Theatorium, Columbia Falls, 
Mont. — General patronage. 

SET FREE: Art Acord — 18%. Story the same 
old type but believe it is Art Acord's best. A good 
little Western. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, 
Idaho. — General patronage. 

THE CAT AND CANARY: Special cast- This is 
a great picture of the spooky type and should go over 
anywhere. Keeps the audience guessing until the 
very last. Our i>atrons liked it very much. — W*-' L. 
Grouse, Ideal theatre. Bloomer, Wis. — General pat- 
ronage. 

PAINTING THE TOWN: Glenn Tryon— This is 
certainly one peach of a show. It is a comedy drama 
with attractive characters and a real plot and enough 
wise cracks to title a dozen pictures. It comes close 
to being a knockout and can not fail to please the big 
majority of any audience. — Chas. Lee Hyde, Grand 
theatre, Pierre, S. D. — General patronage. 

DOWN THE STRETCH: Special cast— December 
20-21. An average racetrack picture with a very 



good cast. So far as I have been able to see all the 
racetrack pictures are the same. However, they are 
good to throw at 'em once in a while for a change 
of diet. Seven reels. — Wm. E. Tragsdorf, Trags thea- 
tre, Neillsville, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

PROWLERS OF THE NIGHT: Fied Humes- 
December 19-20. Average factory made Western to 
light business. Five reels. — ^E. M. Biddle, Strand 
theatre, Paoli, Ind. — Small town patronage. 

MICHAEL STROGOFF: Ivan Moskine— A 
very good picture, but one terrible flop for me. 
Did not take in expenses, with extra advertis- 
ing. Print very poor. Price — plenty. — 
Stephen G. Brenner, New Eagle theatre, Balto, 
Md. — General patronage. 

PRISONERS OF THE STORM: House Peters- 
December 13-14. After two days of beautiful blizzard 
this sureinell was a sweet title to push over on 'em. 
The title fitted in to the Queen's taste. Notwithstand- 
ing it is a good Curwood picture, which would have 
drawn better next, or last, July or August. Good 
program picture. Seven reels. — Wm. E. Tragsdorf, 
Trags theatre, Neillsville, Wis. — Small town patron- 
age. 

THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING: Special 
cast — Fair program picture. Poor box office 
returns. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, Elite theatre, 
Placerville, Cal. — General patronage. 

THE FOURTH COMMANDMENT: Special 
cast — This is a winner and how! Pleased 
everyone, no exceptions. The title drew them 
in and the picture tugging at their heart 
strings held them. The acting of Belle Bennett 
and Mary Carr is superb, as the "greatest 
screen mother's" always is. The little tot, 
Wendell Phillips Franklin, also comes in for 
his share of the laurels. Boost it big, and 
with fair weather you'll have results. This 
just can't disappoint. Admission on this pic- 
ture 10-15-25C. — Ben Eskind, New Kentucky 
theatre, Madisonville, Ky. — General patronage. 

OUT ALL NIGHT: Special cast— November 13-14. 

A clean comedy-drama of the Denny type of picture. 
Percentage of gross receipts has no l>earing on the 
value of a picture in a small town. The weather and 
counter attractions seem to count here. — E. T. Dun- 
lap, Dunlap theatre, Hawarden, la. — General patron- 
age. 

THE STORM BREAKER: House Peters— This 
will satisfy your rough necks and that's all. Six 
reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, III. — 
General patronage. 

POKER FACES: Laura LaPlante— Did not seem 
to take here and I would call it slow moving. No 
plot. Eight reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, 
Breese, 111. — General patronage. 

RANGE COURAGE: Fred Humes— Great, 
give us more like this one. Humes is a comer 
if you give him stories and supporting cast 
like this one. Kid is very good. Print good. 
— Stephen G. Brenner, New Eagle theatre, 
Balto, Md. — General patronage. 

THE OLD SOAK: Jean Hersholt— A very 
good program picture that should please any 
type of patronage and register good at the 
bo.x ofiice. Print good. — Stephen G. Brenner, 
New Eagle theatre, Balto, Md. — General pat- 
ronage. 

LOCO LUCK: Art Acord— Art Acord's oil well 
crook melodrama. People seemed to enjoy it. The 
dog and horse were splendid. Played this with 
Dempsey-Tunney fight picture two nights to big 
houses. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, Idaho. — 
General patronage. 

THE MIDNIGHT SUN: Special cast— For a Rus- 
sian court life picture this was better than I ex- 
pected. Story is interesting though old. The rich 
Russian banker and the grand duke both aim to 
have the American girl in the ballet for their mis- 
tress. She falls in love with a young soldier who is 
ordered to be shot. Exciting ending in which the 
grand duke proves himself a man and allows the 
young couple to go their way. Ballet scenes very 



An Unprecedented Service 

Reports indented and printed in bold face type are those of contributors to "Straight from the Shoulder 
Reports" in Moving Picture World. These reports, together with those which have been published weekly 
in Exhibitors Herald, offer to theatre owners a service unprecedented in the history of the film business 
paper field, presenting a complete coverage to the trade. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



85 



disappointing. Lavish but little dancing. Laura La 
Plante not a dancer. Pat O'Malley fine. Not as big as 
Carl Laemmle would make you believe. Attendance? 
Say 'twas tlie week before Christmas 1 searcned 
through the house and found only six women, a man, 
and a mouse. Hence, "The Midnight Sun" went into 
a complete eclipse. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Sal- 
mon, Idaho. — General patronage. 

FAST WORKER: Reginald Denny— Very good. 
Seven reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 
III. — General patronage. 

RAMBLING RANGER: Johnny Hines— Just fair. 
Six reels. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 
111. — General patronage 

MAN FROM THE WEST: Art Acord— December 
19-20. This was a pleasing surprise. A story of a 
Dude Ranch with plenty of good comedy and an in- 
teresting story. Ran as half of double Western pro- 
gram. Five reels. — E. M. Biddle, Strand theatre, 
Paoli, Ind. — Small town patronage. 

Warner Bros. 

THE HEART OF MARYLAND: Dolores Costello 
—60%. December 18-19. Ihis is a good picture. 
This old war drama has been played and played 
and also filmed, but this is the best cast I ever 
saw. The star fair, suppoi-t good. Will satisfy 
any audience. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

THE LITTLE IRISH GIRL: Special east— 10%. 
Old play but good print. Took an awful licking, 
worst Saturday in years. Intense cold, basketball 
game, Christmas shopping. If Warner had given me 
the play, the advertising, comedy and express would 
etill have lost. This is a good crook melodrama 
where everybody concerned is a crook save the boy. 
Well directed and interesting story. Dolores Costello 
appealing but rather wasted in this type of play. — 
Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, Idaho. — General 
patronage. 

WHITE FLANNELS: Special cast— 20%. Decem- 
ber 17. A good show but title did not draw. Seven 
reels. — R. Pfeiffer, Princess theatre, Chilton, Wis. — 
Small town patronage. 

THE THIRD DEGREE: Dolores Costello— 50%. 
December 21. This is a splendid program picture. 
Star, cast and story good entertainment. — Bert Silver, 
Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — ^General pat- 
tonage. 

DON'T TELL THE WIFE: Special cast— 25%. 
December 14. Just a fair comedy drama. Satisfied 
50 per cent. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. — ^General patronage. 

MATINEE LADIES: May McAvoy— 70%. Decem- 
ber 11. An interesting program picture. Pleased 
Sunday business. Seven reels. — R. Pfeiffer, Princess 
theatre, Chilton, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

THE NIGHT CRY: Special cast— 55%. Rin Tin 
Tin in an unique different story. "The Night Cry" 
is made of a big condor who kills the sheep (blame 
put on the dog), and shots of the bird are wonderful. 
The condor swoops down and picks up the little girl 
and takes her to the crags of the mountains where 
Rin Tin Tin rescues the girl and falls off the peak, 
killing the bird. Better buy it. — Philip Rand, Rex 
theatre, Salmon, Idaho. — General patronage. 

WHAT EVERY GIRL SHOULD KNOW: Patsy 
Ruth Miller— 15%. December 12-13. Title mislead- 
ing but proved a satisfactory entertainment. Seven 
reels. — R. Pfeiffer, Princess theatre, Chilton, Wis. — 
Small town patronage. 

ONE ROUND HOGAN: Monte Blue— December 
23-24. A pleasing picture. Some fine fight pictures 
and a good story. Seven reels. — John L. Danm, 
Strand theatre, Wadsworth, O. — General patronage. 

TRACKED BY THE POLICE: Rin Tin Tin- 
December 22-23. A very good dog picture. I have 
tried everything from soup to nuts on 'em in the 
past two weeks, but Rinty is the only one that 
apparently can pull 'em against the Xmas shopping. 
Here's a Merry Xmas to him and his good looking 
spouse, Nanette, and their whole brood of little 
Rinties. Six reels. — Wm. E. Tragsdorf, Trags the- 
atre, Neillsville, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

State Rights 

PLAY SAFE: Monty Banks— December 16-17. 

Slap-stick comedy in five reels. Failed to draw 
against cold weather. Five reels. — Ernest Vetter, 
Majestic theatre, Homer, Mich. — General patronage. 

TUNNEY-DEMPSEY FIGHT: This sure is good. 
Can't be beat, but 1 did not take in film rental and 
express charge. — J. W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, 
Breese, 111. — General patronage. 



Short Subjects 

EDUCATIONAL 

FELIX IN PEDIGREED Y: About up to usual 
standard of these cartoons. They all go over as 
regular diet. — A. G. Witwer, Grand theatre. Rainier, 
Ore. — General patronage. 

HIGH SPOTS: Al St. John— A Funny one. Two 
reels. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, 
Mich. — General patronage. 

HOT COOKIE: George Davis— Fair. One reel.— 
Andrew Rapp, Theatorium theatre, Emienton, Pa. — 
General patronage. 

MISTER CHUMP: A good single reel comedy. 
One reel. — Andrew Rapp. Theatorium theatre, Emien- 
ton Pa. — General patronage. 

NO SPARKING: A good comedy.— Bert Silver, 
Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General pat- 
ronage. 

THEN AND NOWS: A scenic filler. Old stuff 
which appeared to be uninteresting. — A. G. Witwer, 
Grand theatre. Rainier, Ore. — General patronage. 

F B O 

BACK FIRE: Three Fat Men— Fair comedy. Two 
reels. — Andrew Rapp, Theatorium theatre, Emienton, 
Pa. — General patronage. 

BEAUTY PARLOR SERIES: I have run seven of 
the "Beauty Parlor Series" and found every one a 
good clean comedy with plenty of laughs and yells 
in them. F B O sme has the comedies. I also 
had one of the Micky McGuires and it too was a 
dandy. Boys, do not be afraid to buy them, you can't 
do better. Two reels. — C. Gehlsen, Community theatre, 
Burk, S. D. — Small town patronage. 

LAST NOSE OF SUMMERS: Al Cooke-Kit Guard 
— These Beauty Parlor series are pretty fair comedy. 
The third we have had and patrons seem to like 
them. Two reels. — A. G. Witwer, Grand theatre. 
Rainier, Ore. — General patronage. 

MICKEY'S PALS: Mickey Mc Guire— My first 
Mickey, but believe me not my last. This is along 
the line of the old Our Gang comedies and believe 
me they are great. Better than the Our Gangs today. 
Two reels. — G. B. Orne, Richmond theatre, Richmond, 
Vt. — General patronage. 

THE UNSOCIAL THREE : Another unfunny com- 
edy. Two reels. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. — ^General patronage. 

FOX 

CUPID AND CLOCK: Just a comedy. Two reels. 
— Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. 
— General patronage. 

KANGAROO KIMONO: Pretty good comedy. 
Pleased most all. Two reels. — A. G. Witwer, Grand 
theatre. Rainier, Ore. — General i>atronage. 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 

BUFFALO BILL'S LAST FIGHT: Good techni- 
color two reeler. Two reels — R. Pfeiffer, Princess 
theatre, Chilton, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

BUFFALO BILL'S LAST FIGHT: This series of 
great events from Metro are going over fine with 
me. The technicolor is wonderful and they are 
entertaining as well as educational. Two reels. — ■ 
G. B. Orne, Richmond theatre, Richmond, Vt. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

HEEBE JEEBES: Our Gang— Best Our Gang 
from Metro to date from the new series. There is 
none of them come up to the old standard of the 
Our Gangs. Two reels. — G. B. Orne, Richmond the- 
atre, Richmond, Vt.- — General patronage. 

METRO COMEDIES: These comedies are coming 
through good. There are more laughs in them than 
anything else we run. Two reels. — John L. Danm, 
Strand theatre, Wadsworth, O. — General patronage. 

METRO ODDITIES: With the exception of a few 
the oddities are mighty interesting short reels. I 
believe the best I've ever seen. One reel. — John L. 
Danm, Strand theatre, Wadsworth, O. — 'General pat- 
ronage. 

M-G-M NEWS REEL: A real good news reel. No 
better on the market. — Earl Somerville, Opera House 
theatre, Raymond, Minn. — General patronage. 

M-G-M NEWS: M-G-M News pretty fair. How- 
ever, not as good as Kinograms. One reel. — Andrew 
Rapp, Theatorium theatre, Emienton, Pa. — General 
patronage. 

THE STING OP STINGS: Charley Chase— A very 
good comedy. Two reels. — Andrew Rapp, Thea- 
torium theatre, Emienton, Pa. — General patronage. 

WHAT EVERY ICE MAN KNOWS: Max David- 
son — Here is a dandy comedy. Max Davidson is cer- 
tainly a good comedy star. Two reels. — Andrew 



Rapp, Theatorium theatre, Emienton, Pa. — General 
patronage. 

PATHE 

ARE BRUNETTES SAFE?: Charlie Chase— Very 
good. Two reels. — R'. Pfeiffer, Princess theatre, Chil- 
ton, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

CURED IN EXCITEMENT: Fair. Two reels.— 
R. Pfeiffer, Princess theatre, Chilton, Wis. — ^Small 
town patronage. 

JEWISH PRUDENCE: Max Davidson— Very good. 
Two reels. — R. Pfeiffer, Princess theatre, Chilton, 
Wis. — Small town patronage. 

THE JOLLY JILTER: Ben Turpin— "Unfunny." 
A classic that did not get a wrinkle. Turpin didn't 
even use his eyes. Two reels. — Bert Silver, Silver 
Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — ^General patron- 
age. 

LOVE'S LAGGARD: Good. Two reels.— R. Pfeif- 
fer, Princess theatre, Chilton, Wis. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

A ONE MAMA MAN: Another comedy played up. 
Two reels. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville, Mich. — General patronage. 

SEVENTH LANDLORD: This is a good comedy. 
Two reels. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

SLIPPING WIVES: A comedy. Two reels.— Bert 
Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — 
General patronage. 

SMITH'S FISHING TRIP: Very good. Two reels. 
— R. Pfeiffer, Princess theatre, Chilton, Wis. — Small 
town patronage. 

TIRED BUSINESS MAN: Always please kids. 
Two reels. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville, Mich. — General patronage. 

WHY GIRLS SAY NO: A fair comedy. Two reels. 
— ^Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, 
Mich. — General patronage. 

UNIVERSAL 

BUSTER'S GIRL FRIEND: Fine comedy. Tige 
is a wonder. Last reel pure melodrama in which 
Tige rolls down rocks on the villains in the cave. 
Something new. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, 
Idaho. — General patronage. 

THE COLLEGIANS: George Lewis— Second series. 
"The Collegians" are still holding the center of the 
stage as a fine series of shorts. Two reels. — John 
L. Danm, Strand theatre, Wadsworth, O. — General 
patronage. 

KID GEORGE: Fairly good. One of the "Let 
George Do It" series that are nothing to rave about 
but will get by. Two reels. — G. B. Orne, Richmond 
theatre, Richmond, Vt. — General patronage. 

UNIVERSAL 

BLAZING DAYS: Fred Humes— A fair imitation 
of a Western. — G. Carey, Strand theatre, Paris, Ark. 
— General patronage. 

BUSTER WHAT NEXT: One of the best com- 
edies I have ever run, pure clean fun. Fast and 
furious. Dogs, dogs, dogs and cats. Holy cats, what 
good gags. Harold Lloyd will turn green with envy 
if he sees this. The little visiting girl, the fat pest, 
is a scream, and then there's a dandy kid boxing ring 
fight. House in an uproar. Book it. — ^Philip Rand, 
Rex theatre, Salmon, Idaho. — General patronage. 

DO OR DIET: Charles Puffy— Just eo-so laugh- 
getter. One reel. — ^Rudolph Duba, Royal theatre, 
Kimball, S. D. — ^General patronage. 

HOP ALONG: Arthur Lake — Just a comedy, that's 
all. One reel. — ^Rudolph Duba, Royal theatre, Kim- 
ball, S. D. — General patronage. 

I TOLD YOU SO: The Gumps— Very poor, not 
worth running Had many complaints on this one. 
Two reels. — K. R. Smith, Rialto theatre, Stromsburg, 
Neb. — ^Small town patronage. 

LOVE WALLOP: Arthur Lake— A snappy com- 
edy Very good. One reel. — A. G. Witwer, Grand 
theatre, Rainier, Ore. — ^General patronage 

OH TEACHER: Oswald, the Rabbit— Good car- 
toon, but not for my town. Just a waste of 800 feet 
of film for us that we bad to pay for. One reel. — 
Rudolph Duiba, Royal theatre, Kimball, S. D. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

THE PARTY MEN: Charles Puffy— Very nice one 
reeler, the leg show just seems to hold all the bach- 
elors right on the screen with their eyes and don't 
make 'em wink until it's all over. One reel. — Ru- 
dolph Duba, Royal theatre, Kimball, S. D.— General 
patronage. 

RATTLING GOOD "nME: Ben Hall— Good time 
all the way through but a little too silly. We want 
good action and some real smart cracks but leave 
out the silliness in comedies and then you can reap 
the harvest. One reel, — Rudolph Pube, 



86 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



LIVE NEWS FROM COAST TO COAST 



Kansas City 

{Continued from page 46) 

parents at Minneapolis. The row was a lively 
place for more reasons than one on Christmas. 
Virtually all exchanges "called in" their sales- 
men as it was deemed useless to have them 
in the territory during the holidays. All of 
which, of course, helped make up more 
"cheer" for Christmas. There may have been 
some things lacking, but the "cheer" was 
plentiful. Many exchange men sent congratu- 
lations to Bob Gary, former exploiter for 
Universal at Kansas City, following the an- 
nouncement two weeks ago that Bob had been 
made managing director of all Schine thea- 
tres in Ohio. W. E. Bishop, former M-G-M 
exploiter, who was succeeded as publicity 
manager of Loew's Midland by Charles 
Winston, has gone to Detroit to act in a simi- 
lar capacity for Loew interests. 

* * * 

Oklahoma City 

OKLAHOMA.— B. F. Howell is erecting a 
new theatre at La Porte, Texas. . . . The Star 
at Denison is being remodeled. . . . H. Craw- 
ford and G. Taley have taken over the theatre 
at Southland. . . . The R & R Circuit has taken 
over the Juarez at Del Rio. . . . Joe Mitchell 
and C. T. Snodgrass have taken over the 
Liberty at Claude. . . . The Palace at Childress 
is being remodeled and new equipment added. 
The K. & H. circuit will erect a new $50,000 
theatre at Midland, soon. . . . Oscar Korn 
will erect a new theatre at McCamey in the 
near future. . . . The Victor chain will erect 
a new $27,500 unit at San Antonio. . . . The 
Dent Theatres, Inc., will erect a new house 
at Temple to be named Arcadia. . . . W. B. 
Blankenship will erect a new theatre at Level- 
land. . . . Oscar Korn will erect a new thea- 
tre, the Palace, at Fort Stockton. . . . W. T. 
Moiloy has opened his New Eden at Eden. 
. . . The Cozy at Shulenburg has opened for 
business. . . . The K & H Circuit have opened 
their new house at Pyote. . . . Mike Sigal 
opened his new Sigal theatre December 3. . . . 
The K & H circuit has purchased the Idleout 
at Midland. . . . The Alamo at Granger has 
been purchased by /. 0. Roberts. . . . Cole 
Bros, have purchased the Queen at Marshall 
from Claud Dorough. . . . Tracy Flannigan 
has taken over the management of the Martin 
at Mt. Pleasant. . . . The Pantages at Fort 
Worth will go on a picture policy for a few 
weeks, as an intermission between the closing 
and opening of stock. 

* * * 

Minneapolis 

MINNEAPOLIS.— The most pretentious 
program ever undertaken by the motion pic- 
ture theatres here during the Christmas holi- 
days has just been completed, with practically 
every one of the Finkelstein and Ruben down- 
town houses presenting a benefit program for 
the entertainment of the poor of the city. . . . 
The largest program was given at the State, 
at which more than 3,000 children from the 
orphanages and settlement houses were enter- 
tained at a two-hour show, receiving 14 pails 
of candy, 25 crates of apples and 300 pounds 
of nuts. "Chang" was the picture donated by 
Paramount for the show, and the members 
of the Kiddie Revue were the special enter- 
tainers. /. H. Rtiiben, senior partner of the 
firm, personally supervised the presentation of 
the performance. The theatre was specially 
decorated for the affair, which was the largest 
event of its kind ever given in Minneapolis. 



. . . More than 1,000 poor children were guests 
of the Hennepin County Tuberculosis Asso- 
ciation and Finkelstein and Ruben at a Christ- 
mas show at the Lyric theatre, at which the 
price of admission was a health seal. The 
youngsters paraded through the loop district 
to the showhouse behind a "health" clown, 
who was the chief entertainer. . . . The Grand 
was turned over to the Salvation Army for 
its Christmas party, where a full picture pro- 
gram and a number of special entertainers 
delighted mothers and children. Following the 
show the Army distributed Christmas baskets 
to the poor. Earle Brown, Minneapolis mil- 
lionaire sheriff, acted in the role of Santa 
Claus and was assisted by his deputies. . . . 
Seven hundred carriers of the Minneapolis 
Tribune were also entertained at a Christmas 
party at the Grand. . . . The Kiddie Revue 
was taken to the Glen Lake Sanitarium for 
tuberculars, so that the patients might be able 
to see a Christmas show. A program was also 
given for the disabled World War Veterans 
at the Asbury hospital. . . . Entertainment was 
furnished for families of disabled American 
war veterans at a big party in the Minneap- 
olis city hall. . . . Every theatre on the Fin- 
kelstein and Ruben circuit followed the lead 
of the Minneapolis theatres and conducted 
similar Christmas programs. . . . Employes, 
from managers to janitors, contributed their 
services in order to make the shows a success. 

Indianapolis 

INDIANAPOLIS.— In order properly to 
celebrate the holidays, the Liberty theatre at 
Washington recently gave a big matinee 
benefit for the Salvation Army Christmas 
drive. The picture? "Salvation Nell," of 
course. The Liberty donated the theatre, the 
employes gave their services free of charge, 
and the public responded en masse. . . . Chil- 
dren from the Indianapolis orphan asylums, 
numbering about 1,500, were entertained at 
the Zaring theatre here recently. The party 
was in tribute to Dick Case, a business asso- 
ciate of Zaring, who was greatly interested 
in children. Case died two years ago. The 
People's Motor Coach Company and the In- 
dianapolis Street Railway Company provided 
free transportation for the children. . . . Rex 
Snelgrove of Muncie has leased the Star 
theatre, from the Fitzpatrick and McElroy in- 
terests of Chicago and opened the house 
Christmas with the Rex Players. In addition 
to stock, the theatre will also continue show- 
ing motion pictures. . . . According to word 
received in Marion from officials of Universal, 
through Henry Herbel, salesdirector of the 
company, and a former Marion man, the new 
Universal theatre, strictly a motion picture 
house, will be opened about Sept. 1. Work 
on the building, which is to be located near 
Third and Washington streets, will start soon 
and be rushed to completion. Plans have 
been completed by Donald Graham, an Indian- 
apolis architect, and the contract has been 
awarded to a local company. . . . The Palace 
theatre, which has been closed since July, will 
be reopened about Feb. 15 under the manage- 
ment of hoevSs, Inc. Joseph R. Vogel, repre- 
sentative of the company is in Indianapolis 
arranging for the reoair and redecoration of 
the house. The New York organization 
recently acquired controlling interest in the 
theatre from local capitalists. Vogel said the 
theatre will be completely refurnished. It will 
present feature pictures and a stage band. 
M-G-M specials and United Artists pictures 
will be the principal attractions. The band 
has not been selected. 



St. Louis 

ST. LOUIS. — The general contract for the 
construction of a community building to in- 
clude a 1,000-seat motion picture theatre, eight 
stores, seventeen offices and an assembly hall, 
at Acme and West Florissant avenues, by the 
G. M. C. Corporation, has been awarded to 
the William H. and Nelson Cunliff Construc- 
tion Company. The theatre has been leased 
to local theatre men and an announcement 
of the opening date will soon be made. The 
building will cost $325,000. . . . /. Dozier 
Stone, chief promoter of the new Missouri 
theatre in Columbia, has announced the award- 
ing the general contract for the construction 
of the building to the Schultz Construction 
Company of Chillicothe. The contract price 
was $133,755 and provides that the structure 
be completed within 180 working days. . . . 
The Scram City theatre in Hillsboro, 111., 
owned by Frank Halston, was destroyed by 
fire of undetermined origin on December 22. 
The loss was estimated at $10,000 and was but 
partly insured. . . . Tom McKean, manager of 
the St. Louis F B O office, has resigned and 
on January 15 will assume his new duties as 
vicepresident and general salesmanager of the 
Premier Pictures Corporation, 3308 Olive 
street. He has purchased an interest in the 
independent exchange. Associated with him 
are Nat Steinberg, Tommy Tobin and his 
brother, Claude W. McKean. . . . The suit 
brought by Dr. R. B. H. Gradwohl of St. 
Louis against the estate of his brother, Ricord 
Gradivo'hl, former motion picture producer, 
for $5,755 for medical services in his last ill- 
ness, was dismissed December 21 by Justice 
Walsh of the New York Supreme Court. 
Nathan Vidaver, excutor of the estate, showed 
that Dr. Gradwohl still owed his brother $800 
on a promissory note signed in 1919. . . . 
Commissioner Walter N. Davis of the Mis- 
souri Supreme Court, on December 31, re- 
versed and remanded for new trial, the case 
of Benjamin F. Austin, a negro, who for- 
merly operated the Venus theatre, 4264 Fin- 
ney avenue. Austin had been charged with 
defrauding R. F. Williams, also a negro, by 
giving him a chattel mortgage on a theatre 
organ that was already covered by another 
mortgage. He was convicted and sentenced 
to serve two years in the penitentiary, but took 
an appeal. 

* * * 

Pittsburgh 

PITTSBURGH.— H^iV/iaw G. Smith, man- 
ager of the Columbia local branch, is recov- 
ering slowly from a severe attack of the grip. 
"Bill" spends several hours at the office a day, 
but he is far from being in the best of health. 
His many friends wish that he may soon be 
again enjoying his usual vim and vigor. . . . 
Among the visitors along Film Row early in 
the week were : Louis Stein, Natrona ; Wil- 
liam Gray, Monongahela ; Louis Capruggi, 
Export; B. E. Cupler, Washington; John 
Nezvman, New Castle; Tom Rankin, Bridge- 
ville; John Schultz, Wilson; and Nick Anas, 
Wellsburg. . . . Everybody at the Pathe Ex- 
change had had a hand in trimming the giant 
Christmas tree that was placed in the center 
of the office. It was the largest tree ever 
trimmed by the local exchange, and it was 
beautiful. The Pathe folks made merry at an 
office party on the Friday afternoon before 
Christmas, much exchanging of gifts and par- 
taking of refreshments. Frank Ray saw to it 
that the crowd was amused by a number of 
{Continued on page 88) 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



87 



Specify Prints 
on Eastman Film 

The commanding position 
which Eastman film occupies to- 
day has been won by years of 
consistently high quality, backed 
by years of cooperation with 
the industry. 

To get the highest possible 
photographic quality on your 
screen, always specify prints on 
Eastman Positive. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



88 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



LIVE NEWS FROM COAST TO COAST 



Pittsburgh 

(Continited from page 86) 

entertainers he brought down from the Elmore 
theatre, where he is manager. . . . The United 
Artists exchange also boasts of a tree. 
Though this one is smaller than that of Pathe, 
it is entirely white and is a beautiful symbol 
of the holiday season. . . . Howard Dennison, 
accessory salesman at Pathe, spent Christmas 
at his home in Cleveland. . . . Salesmanager 
W. W. Black, of Pathe's non-theatrical de- 
partment, was a Pittsburgh visitor recently. 
. . . Selden Kiralfy, shipper for Columbia, is 
a clever buck and wing dancer, and billed as 
Tack Clifford, appeared on the stage of the 
Harris theatre one evening recently, taking 
part in a contest. Selden got a big hand from 
the crowd and his ambitions to become a pro- 
fessional are stronger than ever. . . . Herbert 
Greenhlatt, former local Universal salesman 
and recently with the Theatre Ad Mat serv- 
ice of Uniontown, has resigned, and is visiting 
Pittsburgh. "Herb" expects to connect with 
a local film exchange in the near future. . . . 
Practically all of the film salesmen were in 
town over the holidays. As Meyer Goldstein 
puts it, "the boys were all stations at_ their 
offices waiting for the exhibitors to bring in 
their gifts personally." . . . Miss Zelda Na- 
thanson, formerly employed in the accounting 
department of the local Pathe branch, has 
gone to New York where she has accepted a 
position in the auditing department of Pathe's 



home office. . . . David Victor, manager of the 
Victor theatre, McKeesport, has returned 
from a three-month vacation to California. 
Dave was accompanied by his wife, who will 
be remembered as Miss Sarah Broder. . . , 
The Pathe exchanges are nationally making 
a drive for play date to be set for the months 
of January and February. Consequently the 
entire local sales staff is in the field concen- 
trating on nothing but play dates for these 
months. 

* * * 

Ottawa 

OTTAWA. — The Toronto managers of Fa- 
mous Players Canadian Corp., Toronto, 
made special presentations to head office offi- 
cials of the company at holiday time, as a 
token of esteem, the ceremony taking place 
at a gathering of theatre men at the com- 
pany's headquarters. C. L. Qiierrie, manager 
of the Palace theatre at Toronto for the 
past six years, was the master of ceromonies. 
... A gift of a cut glass wine and whiskey 
set, with decanter, was made to Clarence Rob- 
son, Eastern division manager of the corpora- 
tion. Ben Geldsaeler, supervisor of Toronto 
suburban theatres, was remembered with a 
mahogany folding card table ; while Harry 
Sedgwick was presented with a cut glass wine 
set, the presentation in the latter instance 
being made by Mr. O'Brien in behalf of head 
office associates. . . . N . L. Nathanson, man- 



aging director, Sam Bloom and Sam Fine, 
representing the B. and F. circuit, were in- 
terested spectators. . . . Alfredo Meunier, 
formerly conductor of the orchestra at the 
Palace theatre, Calgary, Alberta, and more 
recently pianist at the Grand, has been ap- 
pointed as conductor of the big orchestra at 
the Capitol theatre, Calgary, by manager John 
Hasza. . . . When /. B. Reisman played "The 
Fair Co-ed" at the Express theatre, Edmon- 
ton, Alberta, he had the Edmonton Commer- 
cial Grads, women basketball champions of 
the world, as special guests on the opening 
night. The popular young women helped to 
draw a big crowd. ... In a special endeavor 
to get patrons into the Metropolitan theatre, 
Winnipeg, in good time for the two daily 
performances of "Ben Hur," manager Wal- 
ter Davis announced the time of shows as 
2:15 and 8:15 P. M., when, in reality, they 
began at 2:30 and 8:.S0 P. M. Those who 
arrived particularly early were invited into 
the attractively furnished mezzanine, where 
a talented pianist played selections until show 
time. . . . The many theatres of the Famous 
Players chain in Canada made a special fea- 
ture of pictures of a championship ring bat- 
tle that took place in Canada during the week 
of December 26. This was the flyweight 
championship set-to at Toronto, when Frenchy 
Belanger defeated Ernie Jarvis of England, 
for the world's title. The complete fight was 
filmed and prints rushed to all the leading 
cities for immediate showing. The photog- 
raphy was excellent. 



Comedy-Drama Retains Public's Favor 



{Continued from page 33) 
historical, action plays, comedies, war, and costume 
plays. 

LEO BURKHART, JR., Hippodrome and Grand, 
Crestline, Ohio. — Comedies, dramas, comedy-dramas, 
action plays, and war. 

F. T. SAILOR, Star, Fremont, Ind. — Action plays, 
comedy-dramas, Westerns, war, comedies, dramas, 
historical, and costume plays. 

CLARK M. YOUNG, Cla-Zel, Bowling Green, 
Ohio. — Comedy-dramas, historical, dramas, action 
plays, comedies, war. Westerns, and costume plays. 

F. H. STANP, Capitol, Delphos, Ohio. — Westerns, 
comedies, comedy-dramas, dramas, costume plays, 
war, action plays, and historical. 

W. B. STEWART, Star, Deshler, Ohio.— West- 
erns, action plays, comedies, comedy-dramas, dramas, 
war, historical, and costume plays. 

A. T. WORTHINGTON, Star, Bluffton, Ohio.— 
Comedy-dramas, Westerns, action plays, dramas, 
comedies, costume plays, historical, and war. 

JOHN C. RANDELL, Colonial, Montpelier, Ohio. 
— Westerns, comedy-dramas, action plays, comedies, 
war, dramas, historical, and costume plays. 

W. R. GUEIRN, Grand, Paulding, Ohio.— Com- 
edy-dramas, Westerns, comedies, dramas, action 
plays, war, historical, and costume plays. 

H. M. NAFUS, Photo, Grand Rapids, Ohio.— Ac- 
tion plays. Westerns, comedy-dramas, dramas, com- 
edies, historical, war, and costume plays. 

H. B. BETZ, Dreamland, Minerva, Ohio. — Action 
plays. Westerns, comedies, comedy-dramas, and war. 

A. C. GORDON, Star, Weiser, Idaho. — Comedy- 
drSmas, Westerns, and war. 

BYERLY BROS., Rainbow, Mechanicsburg, Ohio. 
— Comedy-dramas, Westerns, dramas, action plays, 
historical, and war. 

JOHN KAISER, Royal, Chillicothe, Ohio.— West- 
erns, action plays, historical, war, comedy-dramas, 
comedies, dramas, and costume plays. 

V. W. PRICE, Majestic London, Ohio.— West- 
erns, action plays, comedy-dramas, and dramas. 

H. J. GEISELMAN, Opera House. Londonville, 
Ohio. — Comedy-dramas, action plays, comedies, and 
Westerns. 

CHARLES MENCHES, Liberty, Akron, Ohio.— 
Comedies, comedy-dramas, action plays, dramas, and 
war. 

K P. MOTT, Lyric, Wooster, Ohio. — Comedy- 
dramas, action plays, dramas, comedies, and West- 
erns. 



G. H. HINMAN, Alhambra. Cuyahoga Falls, 
Ohio. — Westerns, comedies, action plays, war, com- 
edy-dramas, dramas, historical, and costume plays. 

E. E. BAIR, Falls, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio.— Com- 
edy-dramas, dramas. Westerns, action plays, war, 
historical, and costume plays. 

W. J. POWELL, Lonet, Wellington, Ohio. — Com- 
edies, Westerns, comedy-dramas, action plays, dra- 
mas, war, historical, and costume plays. 

R. A. GOSHORN, Lyric, Winchester, Ind. — Com- 
edy-dratnas. Westerns, dramas, action plays, com- 
edies, historical, war, and costume plays. 

HARRY SILVER, Palace theatre, Hamilton, 
Ohio. — Action plays, comedy-dramas, comedies, dra- 
mas, Westerns, historical, war, and costume plays. 

J. G. FURRIER, Harkness, Clyde, Ohio.— Com- 
edy-dramas, comedies. Westerns, dramas, action 
plays, war, historical, and costume plays. 

V. HAIDIN, Boulevard, Kenmore, Ohio. — Com- 
edies, comedy-dramas, action plays. Westerns, his- 
torical, war, dramas, and costume plays. 

ELMER FRITZ, Lyric, Urbana, Ohio. — Dramas, 
comedy-dramas. Westerns, action plays, comedies, 
war, historical, and costume plays. 

R. S. WENGER, Miami, Union City, Ind. — Com- 
edies, Westerns, action plays, comedy-dramas, dra- 
mas, historical, war, and costume plays. 

GEORGE RWELIS, Palace, Washigton C. H., 
Ohio. — Comedy-dramas, action plays. Westerns, war, 
comedies, historical, and costume plays. 

WILLIS AND YADELEVITY, Princess, Medina, 
Ohio. — Action plays, comedies. Westerns, comedy- 
dramas, war, historical, and costume plays. 

JOHN L. DANM, Strand, Wadsworth, Ohio.— 
Comedies, comedy-dramas. Westerns, dramas, war, 
action plays, historical, and costume plays. 

T. I. FOWLER, Idol, Sodi, Ohio.— Comedies, ac- 
tion plays, comedy-dramas, dramas, war, historical, 
costume plays, and Westerns. 

OSCAR SMITH, Apollo, Oberiin, Ohio.— Dra- 
mas, comedy-dramas, costume plays, comedies, and 
historical. 

GEORGE SHREST, Ohio and Weber, Dover, 
Ohio. — Comedy-dramas, action plays, comedies, 
dramas, war. Westerns, historical, and costume 
plays. 

HORNBECK AM. Co., Colonial, Luna, Grand, 
Logansport, Ind. — Comedy-dramas, comedies, action 
plays, Westerns, dramas, historical, war, and cos- 
tume plays. 



R. A. SHOBE, Strand, Monticello, Ind. — Com- 
edy-dramas, action plays. Westerns, comedies, dra- 
mas, historical, war, and costume plays. 

HARRY CARL, Opera House and Ohio, Ash- 
land, Ohio. — Comedies, action plays. Westerns, war, 
dramas, historical, and costume plays. 

H. ROSENTHAL, Ohio, Ravenna, Ohio.— Com- 
edies, comedy-dramas, action plays, historical, West- 
erns, dramas, war, and costume plays. 

J. T. JONES, Fredericktown, Ohio. — Westerns, 
action plays, comedy-dramas, comedies, dramas, war, 
historical, and costume plays. 

MARY BUTORA, Strand and Rex, Marysville, 
Ohio. — Comedy-dramas, Westerns, dramas, action 
plays, war, comedies, historical, and costume plays. 

F. A. KOPPE, Opera House, Logan, Ohio. — Com- 
edy-drarnas. Westerns, action plays, dramas, com- 
edies, historical, war, and costume plays. 

C. A. SMITH, Sherman and Star, Chillicothe, 
Ohio.— Comedy-dramas, dramas, comedies, histori- 
cal, action plays, Westerns, war, and costume plays. 

D. M. SPADE, Majestic, Portland, Ind. — West- 
erns, action plays, comedy-dramas, dramas, war, 
historical, comedies, and costume plays. 

A. E. HANCOCK, Columbia, Columbia, City, Ind. 
— Comedies, Westerns, comedy-dramas, action plays, 
dramas, war, and historical. 

MRS. M. B. WIESE, Grand, Pence, Ind.— Com- 
edies, action plays, comedy-dramas, dramas, histori- 
cal, war, costume plays, and Westerns. 

KRIEGHBAUM BROS., Char-Bell, Rochester, 
Ind. — Action plays, comedies, comedy-dramas. West- 
erns, dramas, war, historical, and costume plays. 

KARL B. GAST, Artonne, Alcron, Ind. — Comedy- 
dramas, action plays, Westerns, dramas, comedies, 
war, historical, and costume plays. 

HAROLD MAKINSON, Park, Barberton, Ohio. 
— Comedy-dramas, action plays, comedies. Westerns, 
dramas, war, historical, and costume plays. 

W. H. BRENNER, Cozy, Winchester, Ind.— Dra- 
mas, comedy-dramas. Westerns, historical, war, ac- 
tion plays, costume plays, and comedies. 

H. STRADER, Jefferson, Huntington, Ind. — Com- 
edy-dramas, action plays, comedies, dramas. West- 
erns, war, historical, and costunie plays. 

H. W. STARRETT, Ottawa, Findlay, Ohio.— 
Comedy-dramas, dramas, comedies, Westerns, and 
war. 



January 7, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



89 



THE BOX OFFICE TICKER 



A System for Determining the Definite Attraction Values of Motion Pictures 



Exhibitors reporting to "What the Picture Did For Me" 
supply a percentage rating obtained by dividing average 
daily gross of house record attraction into average daily 
gross of picture being reported on. When 10 of these 
percentage ratings on a picture have been received, the 



average of these 10 percentage ratings is entered in "The 
Ticker." Each additional percentage-rating report re- 
ceived on pictures entered is combined with those pre- 
viously received and the new average thus created is 
entered. 



Ben Hur (MGM) 95.83% 

No Man's Gold (Fox) 79.72% 

The Mysterious Rider (Par) 78.94% 

The Iron Horse (Fox) 78.61% 

Laddie (FBO) 76.80% 

Irene (FN) 76.75% 

Chip of the Flving U (U) 75.60% 

The Great K. & A. Train Robbery (Fox) 74.80% 

The Cohens and Kellys (D) 74.75% 

Rookies (MGM) 74.55% 

Keeper of the Bees (FBO) 74.33% 

Tell It to the Marines (MGM) 74.20% 

The Vanishing American (Par) 73.95% 

The Winning of Barbara Worth (UA) 72.60% 

The Calgary Stampede (U) 72.54"/„ 

Hills of Kentucky (WB) 72.46% 

The Last Trail (Fox) 72.40y„ 

The Phantom of the Opera (U) 71.90% 

Naghty but Nice (FN) 71.73% 

Arizona Sweepstakes (U) 71.42% 

The Magic Garden (FBO) 71.34% 

Tillie the Toiler (MGM) 71.14% 

The Volga Boatman (PDC) 70.68% 

The Gorilla Hunt (FBO) 70.64% 

The Bat (UA) 70.40% 

Johnny Get Your Hair Cut (MGM) 69.64% 

Slide, Kelly, Slide (MGM) 68.97% 

The Gentle Cyclone (U) 68.81% 

It (Par) 68.52% 

Ella Cinders (FN) 68.46% 

The Sea Beast (WB) 68.45% 

The Son of the Sheik (UA) 68.09% 

Children of Divorce (Par) 68.00% 

Don Mike (FBO) - 67.95% 

Tarzan and the Golden Lion (FBO) 67.80% 

The Man on the Box (WB) 67.70% 

Mr. Wu (MGM) _ 67.70% 

The Tough Guy (FBO) 67.68% 

The Scarlet West (FN) 67.40% 

The Last Frontier (PDC) 66.78% 

The Midnight Kiss (Fox) 66.70% 

The Four Horsemen (MGM) 66.50% 

The Campus Flirt (Par) .t 66.41% 

Flesh and the Devil (MGM) 66.25% 

The Phantom Bullet (U) _ 66.23% 

The Quarterback (Par) 66.05% 

The Black Pirate (UA) 66.04% 

Casey at the Bat (Par) 65.81% 

Babe Comes Home (FN) 65.72% 

The Unknown Cav alier (FN) 65.66% 

Three Bad Men (Fox) ...65.60% 

Man of the Forest (Par) 65.53% 

Senor Daredevil (FN) 65.487o 

The Kid Brother (Par) 65.33% 

Let's Get Married (Par) 65.00% 

The Devil Horse (P) 64.82% 

Desert Gold (Par) 64.81% 

The Limited Mail (WB) 64.70% 

McFadden's Flats (FN) 64.63% 

Sea Horses (Par) 64.63% 

His Secretary (MGM) 64.50% 

Across the Pacific (WB) 64.06% 

For Heaven's Sake (Par) 64.00% 

The Night Cry (WB) 63.90% 

Corporal Kate (PDC) 63.83% 

Up in Mabel's Room (PDC) 63.81% 

We're in the Navy Now (Par) 63.70% 

Frisco Sally Levy (MGM) 63.45% 

Skinner's Dress Suit (U) 63.42% 

Hands Across the Border (FBO) 63.40% 

Canyon of Light (Fox) 63.16% 

The Overland Stage (FN) 63.08% 

Land Beyond the Law (FN) 63.00% 

While London Sleeps (WB) 63.00% 

The Man in the Saddle (U) 62.85% 

Tin Hats (MGM) 62.82% 

Lone Hand Saunders (FBO) 62.71% 

Brown of Harvard (MGM) 61.96% 

The Scarlet Letter (MGM) 61.94% 

Heaven on Earth (MGM) 61.91% 

Little Annie Rooney (UA) 61.84% 

A Regular Scout (FBO) - 61.36% 

War Paint (MGM) 61.17% 

Tony Runs Wild (Fox) 60.94% 

The Two Gun Man (FBO) 60.85% 

His People (U) 60.70% 

California Straight Ahead (U) 60.63% 

Sweet Daddies (FN) 60.55% 

Twinkletoes (FN) 60.50% 

The Buckaroo Kid (U) 60.45% 

Behind the Front (Par) 60.35% 

Tramp, Tramp, Tramp (FN) 60.06% 

The Fire Brigade (MGM) 60.00% 



Clash of the Wolves (WB) 59.93% 

The Understanding Heart (MGM) 59.88% 

The Flaming Forest (MGM) 59.78% 

The Masquerade Bandit (FBO) 59.72% 

The Waning Sex (MGM) 59.51% 

The Teaser (U) 59.50% 

Orchids and Ermine (FN) 59.46% 

Son of His Father (Par) 59.40% 

That's My Baby (Par) 59 00% 

The Flaming Frontier (U) 58.96% 

Under Western Skies (U) 58.83% 

The Wilderness Woman (FN) 58.64% 

The Denver Dude (U) 58.43% 

Wild to Go (FBO) 58.33% 

Sally, Irene and Mary (MGM) 58.09% 

The Texas Streak (U) 58.07% 

The Goose Woman (U) 57.80% 

Rolling Home (U) 57.75% 

Paradise (FN) 57.50% 

The Red Mill (MGM) 57.35% 

The Dark Angel (FN) 57.14% 

Desert Vallev (Fox) 57.00% 

Private Izzy Murphy (WB) 57.00% 

The Eagle (UA) 56.90% 

The Flying Horseman (Fox) 56.85% 

Knockout Riley (Par) 56.80% 

The Temptress (MGM) 56.73% 

Old Clothes (MGM) 56.69% 

Let It Rain (Par) 56.47% 

Mike (MGM) 56.45% 

Sally of the Sawdust (UA) 56.45% 

Men of Steel (FN) 56.36% 

Blind Alleys (Par) 56.30% 

Kid Boots (Par) 56.29% 

Man Power (Par) 56.00% 

Wild Justice (UA) 55.86% 

The Rainmaker (Par) 55.72% 

Born to the West (Par) 55.63% 

Valley of Hell (MGM) 55.60% 

Forlorn River (Par) 55.57% 

For Alimony Only (PDC) 55.40% 

Forever After (FN) 55.27% 

Mantrap (Par) 55.20% 

It Must Be Love (FN) 55.18% 

Winners of the Wilderness (MGM) 55.10% 

The Johnstown Flood (Fox) 55.08% 

The Unknown Soldier (PDC) 55.00% 

What Happened to Jones (U) 54.88% 

The Cowboy Cop (FBO) 54.76% 

After Midnight (MGM) 54.70% 

Upstage (MGM) 54.56% 

Hero of the Big Snows (WB) 53.90% 

The Road to Mandalay (MGM) 53.90% 

The Silent Rider (U) 53.75% 

The Barrier (MGM) 53.70% 

Red Hot Leather (U) 53.70% 

California (MGM) 53.63% 

Stella Dallas (UA) 53.54% 

Her Father Said No (FBO) 53.50% 

Beverly of Graustark (MGM) 53.40% 

The Runaway (Par) 53.40% 

The Family Upstairs (Fox) 53.36% 

Breed of the Sea (FBO) 53.23% 

Subway Sadie (FN) : 53.04% 

Padlocked (Par) 52.82% 

The Midnight Sun (U) 52.77% 

The Palm Beach Girl (Par) 52.75% 

Mother (FBO) - - 52.72% 

Sweet Rosie O'Grady (Col) - 52.72% 

Somewhere in Sonora (FN) 52.70% 

Poker Faces (U) 52.68% 

Miss Nobody (FN) - 52.66% 

Stepping Along (FN) 52.66% 

The Return of Peter Grimm (Fox) 52.66% 

Tom and His Pals (FBO) 52.40% 

The Country Beyond (Fox) 52.00% 

The Blue Eagle (Fox) 51.70% 

Her Big Night (U) 51.65% 

Prince of Pilsen (PDC) 51.60% 

The Strong Man (FN) 51.46% 

The Greater Glory (FN) 51.36% 

The Sea Tiger (FN) 51.20% 

Say It Again (Par) 51.15% 

Variety (Par) 51.11% 

Aloma of the South Seas (Par) 51.10% 

Kosher Kitty Kelly (FBO) 51.09% 

Tumbleweeds (UA) 51.07% 

Spangles (UA) 51.00% 

Sparrowa (UA) 50.95% 

Stranded in Paris (Par) 50.95% 

Combat (U) 50.80% 

Eagle of the Sea (Par) 50.69% 

Outsida the Law (U) 50.60% 



The Arizona Streak (FBO) 50.53% 

The Still Alarm (U) 50.38% 

The Wanderer (Par) 50.36% 

Whispering Wires (Fox) 50.33% 

Hogan's Alley (WB) 50.25% 

Mare Nostrum (MGM) 50.22% 

Prisoners of the Storm (U) 50.13% 

Bred in Old Kentucky (FBO) 50.00% 

You Never Know Women (Par) 50.00% 

The Brown Derby (FN) _ 49.90% 

Pals in Paradise (PDC) 49.83% 

The Million Dollar Handicap (PDC) 49.82% 

Tin Gods (Par) 49.76% 

The Show Ofif (Par) .49.73% 

One Minute to Play (FBO) 49.66% 

The Seventh Bandit (P) _ 49.54% 

The Ancient Highway (Par) 49.40% 

Love 'em and Leave 'em (Par) 49.31% 

The Runaway Express (U) 49.2^% 

The Ice Flood (U) ^ 48.66% 

The Adorable Deceiver (FBO) 48.63% 

Faust (MGM) 48.60% 

The Music Master (Fox) 48.60% 

Whispering Smith (PDC) 48.45% 

The Potters (Par) 48.30% 

Battling Butler (MGM) 48.16% 

Her Honor the Governor (FBO) 48.11% 

The New Commandment (FN) 48.08% 

The General (UA) 47.90% 

New York (Par) 47.81% 

The Taxi Dancer (MGM) 47.40% 

Wedding Bills (Par) _ 47.36% 

Desert's Toll (MGM) 47.33% 

Hair Trigger Baxter (FBO) 47.18% 

The Waltz Dream (MGM) 47.15% 

So's Your Old Man (Par) 47.09% 

Dancing Mothers (Par) 46.90% 

Wet Paint (Par) 46.81% 

There You Are (MGM) 46 77% 

Take It From Me (U) 46^75% 

Paradise for Two (Par) 46.72% 

The Silent Lover (FN) 46.63% 

Out of the West (FBO) !.!!'46!o9% 

Syncopating Sue (FN) 46.07% 

Altars of Desire (MGM) 45.69% 

The Border Sheriff (U) 45.00% 

The Cat's Pajamas (Par) _ 44.93% 

Just Another Blonde (FN) 44.91% 

Fine Manners (Par) 44.40% 

The Marriage Clause (U) 44.35% 

Thirty Below Zero (Fox) 44.30% 

The Blind Goddess (P.ir) 43.88% 

The Mystery Club (U) 43.83% 

Mismates (FN) 43.72% 

Blonde or Brunette (Par) 43.50% 

The Duchess of Buffalo (FN) _ "....""!!43.46% 

A Little Journey (MGM). 43.46% 

Fascinating Youth (Par) 43.35% 

The New Klondike (Par) 43.27% 

Partners Again (UA) 42.87% 

Bardelys the Magnificent (MGM) 42.73% 

Special Delivery (Par) 42.18% 

Miss Brewster's Millions (Par) 42.12% 

Ranson's Folly (FN) 42.00% 

La Boheme (MGM) _ _....."41.95% 

Midnight Lovers (FN) 41.85% 

The Love Thief (U) _ .41.72% 

Ladies at Play (FN) 41.61% 

The Canadian (Par) 41.58% 

Hold That Lion (Par) 41.54% 

Blarney (MGM) 41.38% 

The Old Soak (U) 41.06% 

The Wise Guy (FN) 40.92% 

Kiki (FN) 40.70% 

Fig Leaves (Fox) 40.23% 

The Boy Friend (MGM) 40.20% 

A Kiss in a Taxi (Par) 40.00% 

Held by the Law (U) 39.64% 

Bigger Than Barnums (FBO) 39.53% 

Lovers (MGM) 39.20% 

Everybody's Acting (Par) 38.70% 

The Ace of Cads (Par) 38.66% 

Steel Preferred (PDC) 38.36% 

Nell Gwyn (Par) 37.54% 

Into Her Kingdom (FN) 36.33% 

Perch of the Devil (U) 35.87% 

The Amateur Gentleman (FN) 35.50% 

The Great Gatsby (Par) 35.33% 

The Magician (MGM) 34.42% 

You'd Be Surprised (Par) 34.23% 

Exit Smiling (MGM) 33.50% 

Don Juan's Three Nights (FN) 30.80% 

Pals First (FN) 28.66% 



90 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 7, 1928 



CHICAGO PERSONALITIES 

By Whit 

ABOUT the biggest piece of news down the row last Friday was the 
Z_\ merger of "Exhibitors Herald" and "Moving Picture World," which was 
X X made public on that day. The merger created no small bit of surprise 
and received 100 per cent approval from everyone along the row. 



Congratulations seemed to be the order of 
the day, and many fine compHments were paid 
the Herald, and the paper which takes birth 
today, The Exhibitors Herald and Moving 
Picture World. "A great move" ; "a wonder- 
ful thing for the industry"; "the new 
paper will be far above all competition"; "just 
the thing the industry has beea wanting," were 
some of the fine tributes paid the merger. 
* * * 

Sam Gorelick started the New Year off 
right by renewing his subscription to this 
publication last week. "I'd rather go home 
without my pay check than the paper," says 
Sam. "My wife can't live without it." 

;{c ^ :}! 

Al Perretz, who has been traveling the 
Illinois territory for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 
has been transferred to the New York ter- 
ritory. * * * 

Sam Shurman, Milwaukee manager of 
M-G-M, was in town last Thursday and en- 
tertained the boys with a thrilling account 
of his bronco auto that won't stay hitched. 
It seems that Sam parked his car on the side 
of a hilly street in Milwaukee. Some hours 



later when he came back, his car was gone. 
It had rolled three blocks and crashed into 
a building excavation. Sam is now advo- 
cating hitching posts for all hilly streets. 

* * * 

Maurice Saulkins and Jack Rubin opened 
the Peerless theatre on the South Side on 
New Year's Eve. We wish them luck on 
their new venture. 

* SjS * 

B. J. Vought of the Palace theatre, Crovra 
Point, returned recently from Nashville, Tenn. 

sjc ^ ^ 

Herb. Washburn spent last week on the 
road in the interests of F B O. 

* * * 

The F B O boys are quite a bespatted 
bunch these days. Herb Washburn, Joe Lyon 
and Walter Brown are the latest to don the 
ankle-warmers, and even Eddie McEvoy, 
when last seen in these parts, was proudly 
flashing a pair of natty gaiters. It is un- 
officially reported that Walter's were made 
by Omar the Tent Maker. 

^ ^ ^- 

The Kedzie theatre, Kedzie and Madison, 



BANNER PRODUCTIONS Inc. presents 

"WANTED ■ 
A COWAED 

Ae/^WAv STERLING PICTURES 

')ISTRIBUTING CORE 




LILLIAN RICH 
ROBERT FRAZER 

For Illinois 

GREIVER PRODUCTIONS 

831 SOUTH WABASH AVE., 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



HARRY S. NORTHRUP 
FRANK BROWNLEE 

For Indiana 

MIDWEST FILM CO. 

OF INDIANA 

218 Wimmer BIdg., Indlanapoll* 



will open on January 22, with a dramatic 
roadshow policy. The first show will be 
"Abie's Irish Rose," with the New York cast, 
it is reported. The house has been running 
pictures and vaudeville under the Kedzie 
Amusement Co. 

* * * 

Freddie Martin, at United Artists, had a 
lot of fine things to say for the merger of 
the Herald and the World. Martin at one 
time held down an editorial position on the 
World in the Chicago office. When he wasn't 
reviewing pictures, he could usually be found 
at the old Essenay studios watching 'em 
manufacture more for him to review. 

^ ^ 

Balaban & Katz have booked the Education 
one-reel Carter DeHaven novelty film of im- 
personations of famous screen stars, and will 
run it in all their houses. 

"Gosh, what a paper Exhibitors Herald 
AND Moving Picture World will be !" declares 
Dave Durbin. 

* * * 

The letter from the two Los Angeles boys, 
Murray and Hodges, almost got me in bad 
down the row last week. Frank Ishmael was 
indignant because he was called the world's 
worst golfer and upon reading the letter im- 
mediately dispatched a wire to Hodges 
challenging him to golf duel. Ishmael won 
several trophies at the last golf tournament 
and offers this as sufficient proof of his 
prowess at batting the ball. Arrangements 
are now being made to have the duel shot 
at some half way point between Chicago and 
Los Angeles. Special trains will be run if 
necessary. 

* * * 

The Coston Circuit has taken over the 
Vendome and Pickford theatres. 

What other film row in the country can 
boast of having three brothers on its Film 
Board of Trade beside Chicago? With the 
recent election of Lester Silverman as a 
member of the Board representing Si Greiver, 
there are now three Silverman brothers on 
the board. Ed Silverman was the first member 
and has served as president more than once, 
and Earl is a member representing Warner 
Bros. 

Wynona Flaven is now director of pub- 
licity for the Schoenstadts. 

* * * 

According to news stories emanating from 
the offices of National Playhouses, "The 
Capitol theatre is about to inaugurate a new, 
startling policy of entertainment with the tri- 
umphant return of the popular Albert E. 
Short and his huge symphonic band the latter 
part of January." 

* * * 

After spending all last month on the road, 
Brichetto is once more warming his chair at 
the M-G-M office. 

* * * 

Munn Delano has also been elected as a 
member of the Film Board. He will represent 
Tiffany-Stahl Productions. 

* * * 

Roy Alexander says that Columbia has 
purchased 12 Chaplin comedies made for 
Mutual under the famous million dollar 
contract. The pictures have been booked by 
National Playhouses, Coston, Lynch, and 
Lubliner & Trinz. "Easy Street," one of the 
group, will be shown at the Roosevelt, be- 
ginning January 12. 

I don't know what effect this frozen weather 
is having on Chicago box offices, but I do 
know that it's playing havoc with my frost 
bitten ears. ^ ^ 

Popular refrain : "Give Ale a Night in 
June." 

* * * 

These double holidays sure do play the 
devil with one's ambition. 




cAh adaptation 
of a most unusual - ^ 

STORY -FALSE FIRES" QCM^JS ROY COHEN 



ONE OF America's 

MOST POPULAPk 
AUTHORS 



A RAYAP^T ^^^FAMOUS AUT+fORS" PlCTUf^-g- 



COLUMBIA PICTURES 
Go Over Great with Movie 
Audiences Everywhere— 
Exhibitors* Reports from 
All Over the Country Fur* 
nish the Undeniable Proof 



m0 



Batting Averages 




Reprinted from 
GREATER 
AMUSEMENTS 

Mlnneapoli* RagUnal, 
Dacambar 27, 1927 



Columbia maintains its hold on first place by virtue of reports without a bad on( 

among them, giving them an .875 rating, which is fair for that exalted position. Fo3 
comes up for air this week and climbs into second place with an .850 average, which 
far behind Columbia and not so far ahead of Tiffany-Stahl which dropped from second 
place last week to third but still maintaining a good average of .839. As to number of 
reports — look 'em over. How they did come in this week! Exhibitors must be running 
continuous shows with hourly changes of programs. Paramount slipped us 31 report 
blanks with the blank parts filled in nicely enough to give them a fourth place rating 
with an average of .830. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer was not far behind Paramount in number 
of reports with a good 29 but they lagged far behind' in quality and hooked seventh 
place, three points behind an .800 label. As to the heavy hitters, Metro continues to be 
"The Babe" and chalked up two homers while Paramount and Universal boosted their good 
totals with one apiece. Columbia entered the home-run race with a 100 per cent report, 
too. The line-up for this week is: Columbia (10), .875; Fox (13), .850; Tiffany-Stahl (9)^ 
.839; Paramount (31), .830; United Artists (4), .825; FBO (21), .805; M-G-M (29), .797?^ 
Universal (14), .795; Pathe (14), .789; First National (17), .776; Warner Brothers (12), 
.771. 



Why Keep On Cheating Your Box-Office 
When Yoii Can Play Pictures That Pay! 

ASK TOUR COLUMBIA EXCHANGE ABOUf THESE: 

Jack Hoir in THE WARNING 

A GEORGE B. SEITZ PRODUCflON 

Claire Windsor in The OPENING NIGHT 

DIRECfED BY EDWARD H. GRIFFITH 
COMING! A POPUiAR SIAR IN A NEW ROLE I 

ESTELLE TAYLOR. IN LADY BAFFLES 





Ft,tcrrd flt second-class matter, August 20, 1917, at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under the act of March S, . ,n7a 





mmomm 



. , Chain Theatrical Enterprises, 
Umversal Cham ^l^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

MEW VOBK, N. Y- 



M,rll 23. W?" 



^.e ,o.en .or.o„ Or^" 
XB60 •Broaa«y__ 



I NCOf 




March 
1926 




Pell. 



1987. 



an ^ntimate little message from 

the most 





pop 



u 



lar 



blonde in 
the world 



I know you will like them. 




DOROTHY. H.ally very clever, 
though a little unrefined. 




GUS EISMAN. The Button King, 
who educated me. 




CHESTER CONKLIN wanted my 
part but they made him Judge. 





I think it is perfectly wonderful that I'm to meet all 
you nice exhibitor gentlemen. Since Miss Anita 
Loos told people about me in "GENTLEMEN PREFER 
Blondes" it seems that I am famous. I mean the 
book sold over a million copies and the play by 
Miss Loos and Mr. Emerson was such a big success, 
and now Paramount has put me in the moving 
pictures — a girl cannot really be blamed for feel- 
ing people just naturally like her. Everybody says 
"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" on the screen is 
sure to make a lot of money for you gentlemen. 
Of course art is everything, but money is nice too. 

Lorelei Lee 

"Gentlemen 



Prefer Blondes 



ParamounVs Super-Comedy Hit 



ANITA LOOS and JOHN EMERSON 
who made so much money out of me, 
they've retired. 



From the famous story by Anita Loos and the play by Anita Loos and John 
Emerson. A Hector TurnbuU Production, directed by Malcolm St. Clair. 

10 Great Paramount Specials 

HAROLD LLOYD in "SPEEDY"* "GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES" 
"BEAU SABREUR" "TILLIE'S PUNCTURED ROMANCE" 

"LEGION OF THE CONDEMNED" "BEHIND THE GERMAN LINES" 

"THE LAST COMMAND" Umnings) "STREET OF SIN" (Jannings) 

"OLD IRONSIDES" "KIT CARSON" (Fred Thomson) 

*Pro. by Harold Lloyd Corp. Paramount Release. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



3 




^^All right to give patrons a lot of show for the money, PROVIDED—" says 
Al Christie^ world^s leading producer of first -run short comedy classics . . . . 
*'^A fifteen-minute Paramount-Christie Comedy in the de luxe style weVe 
making them today is included to give your fun-loving audiences the best 
short laugh hits on the market" 




PARAMOUNT-CHRISTIE 

/ 12 CHRISTIES \ £^ 11/r T? T\ T C ^'L^Y DOOLEYS \ 

\8 BOBBY VERINONS / V>4 V/ IfX JLJ mJ J. J-J O \ 8 JIMMIE ADAMS / 




oFF another HIT For 

FIRST NATIONAL 

alter ijou've read this remarkable VARIETY reifim- 

"Very smooth comedy for high life, of genteel atmosphere, great pictorial 
beauty, with appeal to all classes of fans. Strong cast and fetching 
title insure draw.. .Belongs to the type becoming more and more 
popular. . .One of the neatest pieces of work Kane or anybody 
else has sponsored. Wealth of fine material in the hands 
of players of superlative skill in their types . . .The re- 
suits speak for themselves. The literary substance^ 
are excellent and the performance of the cast i« 
impeccable in its artless flow... The picture is 
a revel in elegance of modern costume, of 
persuasive scenic settings and those othei* 
elements that go to make up a compos- 
ite atmosphere. It works out into a 
neat surprise trick. . .the situation 



i^ deftly twisted for an unex- 
pected outcome, graceful 
ind with a smart i 
sentimental / 
turn of high 
comedy." 

■ Rush 





The 
Independent 
Film Trade 
Paper 



EXHIBITORS 

HERALD 



i MOVING PICTURE 



WORLD 



Home 
Office: 
407 So. Dearborn St. 
Chicago 



IN THIS ISSUE 



Rampage of admission charges harms theatres in Southwest; Cutting prices damages goodwill and 
box-office — Increasing theatre receipts in 1928 depends upon producers turning out better pictures, 
say exhibitors of New York state — Chicago police kill two theatre bandits after tip from "woman 
scorned"; Winnipeg manager is robbed of jewels. 



COMPLETE INDEX TO CONTENTS 



NEWS 



Ascher Theatrical Enterprises in Chicago goes into hands of 
receivers when suit for $19,000 is started — ^Josef von Sternberg 
wins $10,000 and gold medal as director of best picture shown 
at Paramount theatre. 

St. Louis sets seating record with capacity per capita twice that 
of New York City, survey shows. 

Veterans and youngsters share honors as showmen — Midland 
company at Kansas City buys interest in 24 "U" houses. 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

FILM AND EQUIPMENT — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Robert 
Morton Organ Company, Paramount, First National, Eastman, 
Automatic Ticket Register, Greiver Productions, Filmack, Sentry 
Safety Company, Bebe Daniels, Richard Wallace. 

PRESENTATION— Jesse Crawford, Mark Fisher, Shannon's Play- 
time Frolic, Billy Pond, W. R. Welch, Walter Flandorf, Cham- 
berlin and Himes, Henry Murtagh, Maxwell and Lee, Villa Moret, 
Baby Dot Johnson, Brooks Costumes, Ransley Studios, Dave 
Gould, Markell and Faun, Leo Feist, J. Virgil Huffman, Joe 
Kayser, Fred Kinsley, Lew White. 



FEATURES 

Better Projection 29 

Service Talks by T. 0. Service 38 

Los Angeles by Ray Murray 24 

Re-Takes 14 

Pictorial Section 17 

Letters from Readers 49 

Broadway 10 

DEPARTMENTS 

The Studio 21 

Live News from Coast to Coast 28 

Short Features 27 

Presentation Acts 30 

The Theatre 40 

New Pictures 43 

Press Sheets 44 

Quick Reference Picture Chart 45 

Classified Advertising 50 

What the Picture Did for Me 51 

The Box Office Ticker 57 



CHICAGO 

407 South Dearborn St. Telephones Harrison 0036-37-38 
Cable Address: Qnigpubco 
EDWIN S. CLIFFORD, General Manager 

JAY M. SHRECK, Managing Editor 
GEORGE CLIFFORD, Business Manager 
ERNEST A. ROVELSTAD, Netcs Editor 

LOS ANGELES 

5617 Hollywood Blvd. Telephone Gladstone 3754 

RAY MURRAY, Manager 
DOUGLAS HODGES, Advertising Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES : Ui 



EDITORIAL 
AND 
ADVERTISING 
OFFICES 



\EW YORK 

565 Fifth Avenue Telephones Vandarbilt 3612-3613 

JAMES BEECROFT, Manager 
JOHN S. SPARGO, ^Vew York Netcs Editor 

LONDON 
THE BIOSCOPE 
(J. Caboum, Editor) 
Faraday House 
8-10 Charing Cross Rd., W. C. 2 



ited States and possessions — $3.00 per year. Canada — $4.50 per year. Other points of the world — $6.00 per year. Single copies, 25 eents. 
Advertising rate cards and Audit Bureau of Circulations statements furnished upon application. 



6 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS 

HERALD 

ajsi MOVING PICTURE 

WORLD 

Martin J. Quigley, Publisher Editor 

Incorporating Exhibitors Herald, founded in 1915; Moving Pic- 
ture World, founded in 1907; Motography, founded in 1909; and 
The Film Index, founded in 1909 

Published Every Wednesday by 

QuiGLEY Publishing Company 
Publication Office: 407 So. Dearborn St., CHICAGO, U. S. A. 
Martin J. Quigley, President 
Edwin S. Clifford, Secretary George Clifford, Asst. Treasurer 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
Copyright, 1928, by Quigley Publishing Company 
All editorial and business correspondence 
should be addressed to the Chicago office 
Other Publications: The Chicagoan and Polo, class journals; and the follow- 
ing motion picture trade publications published as supplements to Exhibitors 
Herald and Moving Picture World: Better Theatres, every fourth week, and 
The Box Office Record & Equipment Index, semi-annual. 

Whole Vol. 90, No. 2. (Vol. 32, N o. 5) January 14, 1928 

The Merger Acclaimed 

THE publisher and the staff wish to express their very 
great gratitude to persons throughout the industry 
whose highly impressive congratulatory communications 
concerning the consolidation of Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World have been received. Many of these 
communications were published in last week's issue and 
others are disclosed elsewhere in this issue. 

Particularly notable are the expressions from theatremen 
representing every type of exhibition interest in the coim- 
try. It is particularly gratifying to us to know that our 
effort looking to the establishment and maintenance in this 
industry of a single publication, which through its re- 
sources and circulation, would be enabled completely to 
serve the publication requirements of the whole body of 
exhibitors, has been so enthusiastically received. 

• » » 

COMMUNICATIONS from theatremen pointed out the 
very important advantage to them of being able to 
obtain from a single source the full information concern- 
ing product and events in the industry which they require 
in the operation of their business. 

Typical among the expressions received are the fol- 
lowing: 

Mr. George W. Trendle, leading theatre executive and 
operating head of the Kunsky interests in Detroit, said: 

"We consider the merger of Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World the most constructive step the in- 
dustry has had in many days ... it will enable exhibitors 
to get full information from one source." 

Mr. M. M. Rubens, prominent Illinois exhibitor, said: 

"Congratulations on your merger which I personally con- 
sider one of the greatest economic moves of the motion pic- 
ture industry. The high tension at which the exhibiting 
end of the motion pictures is now conducted makes it im- 
perative that your field be covered in a compact manner." 

Mr. James E. Coston, one of Chicago's most powerful 
figures in exhibition, said: 

"We believe that this move will be a great benefit to the 
industry." 

Mr. Fred S. Meyer of Milwaukee, who has made a nation- 



wide name for himself as one of the most enterprising 
theatre executives, said: 

" 'Those profit most who serve best' unquestionably is 
responsible for Herald-World merger. I have religiously 
followed the progress and achievements of the Herald 
since its inception and rejoice in the consolidation which 
will not only make the Herald foremost beyond any com- 
parison but will also prove of greater and more indispen- 
sable value to all exhibitors everywhere." 

Mr. Philip Rand, who from the small town of Salmon, 
Idaho, has made his voice heard throughout the world of 
motion pictures, said: 

"The merger of the Herald and World will permanently 
guarantee the exhibitor his charter of movie rights; that 
is, the opportunity of having his opinions printed and pic- 
tures reported upon. Without these the exhibitor would 
be helpless. Both magazines uphold the personal equation 
idea between exhibitor and publisher and these letters and 
reports lead to correspondence between every branch of 
the industry and bring ail in touch. This inspires confi- 
dence in the magazine. This merger is bound to succeed 
big and give the trade world the one big human interest 
and personal contact magazine." 

Mr. M. E. Comerford, head of the huge Pennsylvania 
circuit, writes that the merger is "indicative of the won- 
derful progress you are making." 

Mr. Kenneth S. Fitzpatrick of Fitzpatrick and McElroy 
said: 

"With the much broader scope the merger gives you, 
added to the splendid organization with which you have 
surrounded yourself, I know you will make this larger 
trade paper an even greater help to the theatre own- 
ers and managers, as well as to all other branches of our 
industry." 

• » • 

OTHER communications received dwell particularly 
upon the advantage to the exhibitor of the combina- 
tion in that a single publication of appropriate calibre 
means much to the theatreman in convenience and in the 
saving of time. 

We wish in this, the second issue of the combined publi- 
cations, to offer assurances to those theatremen who have 
expressed such confidence in us that no effort shall be 
spared to maintain just such a publication as will most 
effectively and most completely serve their interests. 

Our publication effort has always been predicated on the 
idea that our first duty is to the reader; that the success 
of any publication, in this field or elsewhere, depends pri- 
marily upon the quality of its service to subscribers. The 
modem type of publication cannot, of course, exist without 
advertising; the subscription price does not pay for the 
amount of blank paper required to fill a year's subscrip- 
tion. But the value of its advertising pages is in direct ratio 
to the quality of the service to readers. 

The confidence of the industry in the Herald and in the 
World is a trust which shaU be carefully safeguarded. The 
renewed confidence in the consolidation which has been 
expressed by leading representatives of every branch of 
the industry adds to the significance of the trust. We 
shoulder this added responsibility in full confidence that 
its every requirement will be fully and effectively dis- 
charged. 

It is with considerable satisfaction that we have noted 
that the essential reasons which have led to this consoli- 
dation have been quickly grasped by the industry gen- 
erally. The record in other industries reveals similar devel- 
opments. The conditions of the day require fewer and 
more solidly entrenched institutions. 

The consolidation of Exhibitors Herald and Moving 
Picture World has succeeded in accomplishing what the 
conditions of the day required. A single publication of 
sufficient calibre to serve completely and effectively the 
entire industry in all of its branches. 

—MARTIN J. QUIGLEY. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



7 



Rampage of Admission Changes 
Harms Theatres in Southwest 

Cutting Prices Damages 
Goodwill and Box-office 

Public Suspects Managers of Dropping to "Grind House" 
Policy When Rates Are Reduced to Meet Competition 



Educational Gets 
Vocafilm Rights; 
Servicing Is Free 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 10.— Educa- 
tional has acquired the rights to Voca- 
film. Marketing of this simple and 
economical device for synchronization 
will begin soon through Educational 
exchanges. 

Announcement was made this week by E. 
W. Hammons, president of Educational, and 
David R. Hochreich, president, Vocafilm Cor- 
poration. Original cost of Vocafilm will be 
by far the lowest of any synchronization de- 
vice, and the cost of upkeep practically 
negligible, it was stated. No charges are to 
be made for regular servicing, and no seat 
tax or added fees are involved. 

Special Vocafilm "acts" and musical num- 
bers will be released on a regular schedule, 
and it is likely also that a number of Educa- 
tional's comedy and novelty short features 
soon will carry Vocafilm accompaniments. 
These will also be available to producers of 
long features and records are in preparation 
in connection with several current features. 

Vocafilm uses standard projector and film, 
together with a sound record. No special 
technical service is required in the booth. 

Early Commission Action 
on Paramount Intimated 
in Note to Congressman 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 10.— Possibilities of 
action on the Paramount case in the near fu- 
ture are intimated in a letter from the Federal 
Trade Commission to Congressman Clarence 
MacGregor of New York, in response to an 
inquiry as to what might be expected in the 
case. 

The plan of the respondents for compliance 
with the order, MacGregor was informed, is 
now before the commission for consideration. 



Los Angeles Chosen for 
Wampas Frolic and Ball 

( special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10.— This city will 
again be the scene of the annual Wampas 
Frolic and Ball. This was definitely decided 
upon at an executive meeting of the Western 
Association of Motion Picture Advertisers 
held last week for the purpose of considering 
various offers to stage the annual frolic in 
other Coast cities. The big affair will be held 
at the Ambassador auditorium here, Saturday 
evening, February 25. 



Tom Foster of Star at 
Stanley, Wis,, Operated on 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

STANLEY, WIS., Jan. 10.— Tom Foster, 
who operates the Star theatre here, under- 
went an operation for appendicitis last 
Wednesday and is now recuperating. He had 
been in poor health for some weeks prior to 
the operation. 



[By Special Correspondent of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World] 

SAN ANTONIO, Jan. 10. — The present rampage of theatre price changes 
is a problem of concern to theatre owners in the Southwest and undoubtedly 
throughout the country. The question of whether helter-skelter shifts in ad- 
mission rates are ruining the community standing of many really excellent 
houses, as a resume in Texas indicates, or whether a fixed and unalterable 
charge for all shows of the individual theatre would be better and more profit- 
able is one confronting every theatre manager. 

Some Managers Shortsighted? 

Probably one of the most interesting and conclusive articles ever published 
in the South on the matter was printed recently in the Dallas Morning News, 
by John Rosenfield, Jr., dramatic critic. Rosenfield warns that many managers 
are not looking far enough into the future when they make indiscriminate 
changes in prices. 



He cites an exhibitor telling him that the 
reason he changed his prices from SO cents 
top to 35 cents, for straight pictures, was that 
the public would not pay a SO-cent price for 
pictures these days, when pictures and stage 
entertainment could be had for the same price, 
or a little more. The manager lowered his 
prices. His receipts, formerly $5,500 a week, 
immediately dropped to $3,500. He now does 
not know whether to raise his prices back to 
the old standard, or to continue the low price 
scale. 

He finds that although he lowered his 
prices, he did not increase his patronage 
one bit — in fact, he has lost by the deal, 
because some of his patrons took the 
price loivering to mean the instituting of 
a weaker product. 
His mistake is pointed out as a general one 
in this part of the country. Managers of pic- 
ture houses become hysterical when they see 
the big amount of entertainment offered by 
combination houses, and jump to the conclu- 
sion that they will benefit by a price lowering. 
A general resume of such cases throughout 
the South shows, however, that they do not 
improve their status or earning capacity one 
iota, and do a lot toward lowering the gen- 
eral goodwill of their houses in the minds of 
the patrons. 

Queen Theatre Maintains Price 
The Queen theatre in Houston is a good 
example of the other side of the question, 
the Queen maintains a 50-cent top price, run- 
ning two pictures each week, and has as com- 
petition three houses offering stage and screen 
attractions for ten cents more. But the Queen 
is steadily making money, while a couple of 
other Houston houses, caught in the price low- 
ering maelstrom have succeeded only in "cook- 



ing their goose." Price lowering in Houston, 
or other Texas cities, suggests to patrons 
nothing but a coming "grind policy." And grind 
policies do not pay in Texas, at all. 

Rosenfield notes that the 60-cent top is really 
a misnomer in combination houses, because 
the average top runs around 35 cents or 40 
cents, owing to the many price changes during 
the day. The stage and screen house opens 
in the morning with a shoppers' matinee, at 
25 cents, goes into a 3'5-cent price at 1 to 6, 
and then to its 60-cent price, so that they 
really maintain a price that is on the level pf 
the picture house or even below it. The pic- 
ture house with a 50-cent top, with 35-cent 
matinee until 6 p. m., has an average of 42j4 
cents, which is a bigger average price than 
that of the combination house. The fact of 
not having as many patrons as the larger 
houses will be offset somewhat by this per- 
centage of price difference. But some man- 
agers, even though they have an established 
patronage, with a healthful profit, cannot see 
the light of competition, and jump to the con- 
clusion that a lower price will put them on a 
proportionate earning level with the larger 
houses. 



Chicago Operators 
Take Compromise 

Members of the Chicago Exhibitors' As- 
sociation late Tuesday won out in their 
stand against a 7^2 per cent raise de- 
manded by the operators, when the latter 
agreed to accept a 5 per cent increase 
offered as a compromise by the theatre 
owners. 



Ascher Theatrical Enterprises Goes Into 

Hands of Receivers; Sued for $19,000 

The Chicago Title and Trust company and General Abel Davis were appointed 
receivers Monday for the Ascher Theatrical Enterprises of Chicago. The company 
owns, operates and leases out 13 theatres and the Merrill building in Milwaukee. 

The suit was brought against the firm by Miss R. I. Davis, whose attorneys told 
the court she owned $19,000 worth of stock in the corporation. According to her 
counsel, the company owes $3,500,000. They set forth that while ihe assets of the 
company are in excess of these liabilities the company does not possess cash to 
pay idebts due. The firm, through its attorneys. Bled an answer in which they 
agreed to the appointment of the receiver. 



8 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



Endorsement of a Qreat Enterprise 

This, the second issue of the consolidated publication, prints many additional expressions of congratulations 
on the initiative of those who made possible this outstanding progressive step in motion picture trade joumeJism. 
These expressions recognize the merger of "Exhibitors Herald" and "Moving Picture World" as the most sig- 
nificant event in the history of the business press of this industry, which is certain to have a salutary effect on 
the other branches of the trade. Additional messages will be published in subsequent issues. 



From ADOLPH ZUKOR 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Your merger of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World" is big constructive step of great importance to 
entire industry. You and your paper always have been 
force in promoting best ideals of this business and your 
enlarged scope gives you even greater opportunities for 
that service wrhich has characterized your career. Con- 
gratulations and very best wishes for your continued 
success. 

Adolph Zukor. 

* * * 

From SIDNEY R. KENT 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Merger Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World one 
of most important developments in our industry this year. 
Gives new vitality and meaning to trade paper field. Con- 
gratulations and best wishes for further success. 

Sidney R. Kent. 

* 4: ^ 

From R. F. WOODHULL 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I hasten to add my congratulations to the many I wager 
you have received, following the announcement of the 
merger of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." 

I have a tremendous respect for your vision and I be- 
lieve that congratulations are in order because by virtue of 
that respect, I know it must have been for the best interests 
of everyone involved and if a move is for the good of two 
such trade papers, it must be good for the industry as a 
whole. I sincerely hope the New Year will bring to you 
everything that one could wish for in "first rim" happiness, 
prosperity and genuine content. 

R. F. WoodhuU, 
President, Motion Picture Theatre 
Owners of America, Inc. 

* * * 

From SID GRAUMAN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Consider merger of "Moving Picture World" with "Ex- 
hibitors Herald" an epoch making event in history of motion 
picture journalism, welding into what should be a monu- 
mental publication of utmost value to the industry. 

Sid Grauman. 

^ ^ ^ 

From R. R. BIECHELE 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

May the greatest of success follow in the wake of the 
merger of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." 
It represents a union of two powerful factors in the motion 
picture industry. I am heartily in favor of any movement 



which tends to strengthen the trade press and am sure 
your action is a forward step in better serving of all 
branches of the industry. Please accept my congratulations 
and best wishes. 

R. R. Biechele, 
President, MPTO of Kansas-Missouri. 

^ ^ ^ 

From HARRY S. LORCH 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations to you on the consolidation of "Exhibitors 
Herald" and "Moving Picture World," and the publication 
after January first of the combined trade papers imder the 
joint title, "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." 
I feel sure that each and every member of the Chicago Film 
Board of Trade joins me in extending you our heartiest good 
wishes for the unboimded success of which your past policy 
is an ample guarantee. 

Harry S. Lorch, 
President, Chicago Film Board of Trade. 

* * * 

From "PIONEER PETE" 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I am pleased to note that the "Herald" has been combined 
with the "World." You are to be complimented on this 
merger, and the trade as well. I am anxious to see your 
first issue of the combined "Herald-World." It has been 
my pleasure to read both of these papers for some time. 
The "Herald," however, has been my old standby and for 
that reason I am glad that the combination will be under 
your leadership. 

"Pioneer Pete," 
Pioneer theatre, Amasa, Mich. 

^ ^ ^ 

From H. M. RICHEY 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Mergers are as successful as they are successful in choos- 
ing the right executives and I want to congratulate "Exhibi- 
tors Herald and Moving Picture World" in selecting Martin 
Quigley to continue the good work. 

H. M. Richey, 
General Manager, M. P. T. O. Michigan. 

* * * 

From SILAS EDGAR SNYDER 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I have just received your card announcing the consolida- 
tion of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World," 
effective January 1, 1928. I want to congratulate you upon 
this expansion, Mr. Quigley, and to assure you that not 
only the writer but the A. S. C, as an organization, heartily 
extend their best wishes. 

Any time The American Cinematographer can be of serv- 
ice to you or your publications, kindly advise us. 

Silas Edgar Snyder. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



From GORDON S. WHITE 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Although I am a little late doing it, I still want to join 
the host of your friends who have been extending felicita- 
tions on the very splendid piece of work you have just 
achieved. 

Gordon S. White. 

* * * 

From SAM E. MORRIS 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

We take this opportunity of extending to you our best 
wishes in your new enterprise resulting in the combination 
of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." We 
consider this a progressive step of benefit to the trade. 

Sam E. Morris. 

* * * 

From C. D. GRAIN, JR. 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Please accept my congratulations upon the consolidation of 
"Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." This is a 
splendid forward step, and one that I am sure the mdustry 
appreciates. 

C. D. Grain, Jr., 
Editor and Publisher, 
Class & Industrial Marketing. 

* * * 

From J. J. GOONEY 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Hearty congratulations upon the merger of "Moving Pic- 
ture World" with the "Herald." With the commendable 
"Herald" as a criterion I know your new publication will be 
a greater success and asset to the promotion of our industry. 

J. J. Cooney, 
President, National Playhouses, Inc. 

* * * 

From FRED G. QUIMBY 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations on your latest farsighted venture in tak- 
ing over "The Moving Picture World." I sincerely hope 
that this consolidation will be another successful step in 
helping you continue to dominate the trade journal field. 

Fred C. Quimby, 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 

* * * 

From J. E. STOREY 
Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Am just in receipt of the announcement of the consolidation 
of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World," effective 
New Year's Day and hasten to extend my congratulations 
and sincere good wishes for a very profitable new year. Cer- 
tainly the amalgamation of two such worthwhile organiza- 
tions under your capable management should prove a big 
success. More power to you! 

J. E. Storey, 

Short Subjects Production Manager, Pathe Exchange, Inc. 

* * * 

From SPYROS SKOURAS 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations to you and your associates in developing 
the consolidation of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Pic- 
ture World." This unquestionably is most important pro- 
gressive step in history of motion picture trade journalism 
and will be of great benefit to every exhibitor. 

Spyros Skouras. 



From JAGK KNIGHT 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Having just learned of the merger of the two greatest 
trade papers in our industry we extend to you congratula- 
tions and the confidence that together you will give to the 
ejfhibitors the greatest trade paper during 1928 that the in- 
dustry has ever seen. I hope that in the merger it will give 
added breadth and scope to your department on presenta- 
tions for this particular section is of untold value to the 
theatre operator today. 

Jack Knight, 
Balaban and Katz. 

* * * 

From HENRY B. MURTAGH 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

The union of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World" the two great publications so sincerely and com- 
pletely devoted to the advancement of better pictures, better 
theatres and better music, is an event of great importance 
and tremendous benefit to all of us. I wish you every 
success. 

Henry B. Murtagh, 

Feature Organist. 

From MARKS BROTHERS 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations on your merger and all good wishes for 
the coming year. We look forward with interest to the new 
publication. Good luck. 

Marks Brothers (L. L. and M. S.) 

* * * 

From FRED EDWARDS 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and PubHsher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

"Moving Picture World!" "Exhibitors Herald!" "And the 
smoke goes up the chimney just the same." Don't they have 
one hell of a time trying to keep down those Ohio boys? 
Congratulations. 

Fred Edwards, 
Palace theatre, Ashland, O. 

* * * 

From AL BELASGO 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Let me extend my felicitations upon your consolidation 
with another wonderful periodical, "Moving Picture World." 
Together you now stand alone in your line of endeavors. 

Al Belasco, 
Band Leader, LublLner & Trinz. 

From A. BLANK 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Please accept my hearty congratulations and my best 
wishes for the splendid success of the combined "Exhibitors 
Herald and Moving Picture World." The new magazine that 
must grow out of the union of two such thoroughly fine trade 
journals will undoubtedly merit the whole hearted support 
and the heartiest praise from the industry. 

* * * ^" 

From HARRY LANGDON 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Please accept my congratulations on the merger and my 
very best wishes for continued success and prosperity. 

Harry Langdon, 



10 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



Mark-Strand Theatre 
Holds World Premiere 
of Chaplin's "Circus" 

New York's First Nighters Roar at 

Charlie's New Bag 

of Tricks 

By PETER VISCHER 

NEW YORK, Jan. 10.— When the clock 
struck twelve Friday night, Broadway worked 
itself into a fine pitch of excitement. The 
lobby of the Strand theatre was clogged. The 
street was blocked. Motors were parked 
three deep. Everybody stood around and 
gaped. It seemed the thing to do, for Charlie 
Chaplin's new picture, "The Circus," was hav- 
ing one of those things called a world 
premiere. 

Nearly all the people who go places and 
do things went to the Strand to see the 
great comedian in his new picture. New 
York has been privately excited about "The 
Circus" ever since it was started, so many 
years ago it must have been about the time 
of the gold rush, and there was a turnout 
that would have warmed Chaplin's heart. 

Chaplin Sends Regards 

Half an hour after midnight, when the 
show was advertised to begin, a raucous 
voice on a loud-speaker announced that 



"The Circus" Breaks AU 
House Records at Strand 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 10.— Charlie 
Chaplin's "The Circus" is credited 
with breaking all weekend house rec- 
ords for the Mark-Strand where it is 
having its world premiere. The total 
receipts for the weekend, including 
the Friday midnight opening show, 
nine shows Saturday and nine Sunday, 
amounted to $36,735, and 43,428 peo- 
ple saw the picture. 



Chaplin was unable to be present but sent 
his regards. This was a terrific disappoint- 
ment to those fans who saw "The Gold 
Rush" open in a midnight performance at 
The Strand some summers ago and then 
had the added pleasure of chasing Mr. 
Chaplin and his motor up the street. 

The picture was framed neatly. It was 
preceded only by an overture, during which 
everybody jabbered excitedly, and a pro- 
logrue which brought into view some 
amazing and quite fascinating stage ani- 
mals made, according to the program, by 
Messmore and Damon. Then "The Circus" 
and Chariot. 

Chaplin comes into the picture virtually 
at the start, a hungry, jobless, baggy tramp. 
The mere foreshadowing of his arrival on 
the scene, looking things over and swinging 
his cane, sent his New York audience into 
roars of excited laughter, to say nothing 
of long applause. 

Charlie's Glorious Comedy Seen 

Some of Chaplin's most glorious comedy 
appears in "The Circus." His adventures 
with a second-rate carnival, which he finds 
blundering through the sticks, are shot wi.th 
laughter. He tries out with Wilhelm Tell, 
tames a lion, helps a magician, becomes a 
tight-rope walker. He is Chaplin, with a 
new bag of ideas. Merna Kennedy has 
the feminine lead. 

The more critical in the audience were 
high in praise of "The Circus," crediting 
it with more laughs than any of his old 
pictures, but adding nevertheless that 
there'll never be another picture like "The 
Pilgrim," or "A Dog's Life," or "Shoulder 
Arms," or for that matter any other Chaplin 
picture you can think of. 



Chaplin Film Makes World Bow 



'^rpHE CIRCUS" 
Jl_ Charles Chaplin's 
only picture in 
over two years, had its 
world premiere at the 
Mark Strand theatre, new 
York, last Friday night. It 
was received as antici- 
pated, a discriminating 
body of spectators con- 
firming the United Artists 
star's reputation as a 
comedian of rare genius. 
The abundance of the 
tragi-comic situations in 
circus life proved just the 
thing for this artist's 
unique technique. Chap- 
lin is shown here in his 
latest interpretation, be- 
low with his feminine 
lead, Mema Kennedy. 







January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



11 



Exhibitors Careful in Buying Film 



Paramount Opening 
in Paris Be^ns Era 
of American Houses 

"The opening of the 'Paramount' (a new 
American theatre in Paris) marks the begin- 
ning of a new era in the methodical coloniza- 
tion of our screens: by opulent America," says 
a writer in the French daily newspaper, Le 
Temps. 

"Americans, let us be just to them, do not 
act hypocritically. They don't try to work 
their way in sneakingly, by flattering our 
tastes or our prejudices; they firmly impose 
their own. They do not even consider French 
mentality and are satisfied to apply system- 
atically to our compatriots the industrial and 
commercial methods which have proven suc- 
cessful in their country. They found in 
France a field well prepared, thanks to the 
increasing Americanization of our screens. 
Our exhibitors who are complaining of being 
strangled, make a mistake by shouting too 
loudly; they have been the quartermasters of 
the invader. 

"But what is the us'e of complaining:? The 
harm isr done. Approximately 50 films are 
produced annually in France, clearly insuf- 
ficient to supply the needs of our cinemas. If 
these 50 films were chefs-d'oeuvre, with the 
marks of genius of our race, they would con- 
stitute in spite of everything, the taste of an 
elite, which would, little by little, drive out 
the Americanization of our studios and dis- 
place American productions, even in Yankee 
cinemas. But it is not the case, as you know." 



Alpha Fowler Shifts to 
Universal Atlanta Chain 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ATLANTA, Jan. 10.— Alpha Fowler, one 
of the best known theatre executives in At- 
lanta, has severed his connection with Coml- 
munity Theatres Consolidated, in which Ar- 
thur Lucas and William K. Jenkins are the 
leading factors, to become general manager 
of Naborhood Theatres Corporation, the At- 
lanta subsidiary of Universal theatres, in 
which Oscar S. Oldknow is financially inter- 
ested. 

The holdings of Naborhood Theatres Cor- 
poration include the Ponce de Leon, Madison, 
Fairfax and Empire, the latter being erected. 
It will be the largest community theatre in 
the city, with a seating capacity of 1,000. 

_Mr. Fowler has been active in theatre ad- 
ministration for many years and is a member 
of the Georgia Legislature from Douglas 
county. 



Injunction Against Title 
"Her Wild Oat" Refused 

( special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

^EW YORK, Jan. 10.— Use of "Her Wild 
Oat" as the title of the First National picture 
starring Colleen Moore, was upheld by Judge 
Goddard of the United States District Court 
last Friday, when he dismissed a request for 
an injunction restraining First National from 
the use of that title made by Samuel Cum- 
rnings and Public Welfare Pictures Corpora- 
tion. 

In denying the motion, Judge Goddard said 
that in his opinion the title "Her Wild Oat" 
in no way conflicts with that of the plaintiffs, 
whose picture "Some Wild Oats," released in 
1920, is nominally of an educational charac- 
ter, designed for special audiences interested 
in hygienic education. 



Won't Take Chances Now, 
Say Kansas City Leaders 

Increased Discrimination in Picking Programs Shows 
Stabilizing of Industry, Biechele Declares 

(Are exhibitors more discriminating in buying film than they were, say, two years ago? 
Exchange managers and theatre owners throughout the country are being interviewed in 
an exclusive series of articles by correspondents of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World. Following is the first of the series.) 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 

KANSAS CITY, Jan. 10. — Exhibitors in the Kansas City territory without 
a doubt are exercising more caution and discrimination in buying films than was 
in evidence two years ago in that market. 

Unwilling to Take a Chance 

"Not long ago the average exhibitor was content to go into an exchange and 
buy a picture which looked as though it had good exploitation possibilities and 
drawing power," said A. M. Eisner, former president of the M. P. T. O. of 
Kansas City and now identified with Capitol Enterprises in Kansas City, as 
well as being manager of the Gillis theatre. 

than there formerly was," R. R. Biechele, 



"Today, however, a vast difference prevails. 
Most exhibitors want a picture which has 
proved its box office value. They are unwill- 
ing to take a chance. Of course I am refer- 
ring to suburban theatres in this instance. 
They want pictures which have established 
dollar marks in the large first run houses. 
On the other hand, the first run exhibitor 
looks over a film pretty much as an expert 
stockman would a racehorse. He, too, is un- 
willing to take any chances." 

Film Must Prove Worth 

" 'What has that picture done in Kansas 
City?' is the first question most exhibitors in 
the territory usually ask me," said a veteran 
representative of a large exchange. "They 
ask me what it has done, but they usually 
know before I answer them. I may have some 
really good pictures which have not played in 
the larger houses of Kansas City yet, but the 
small town or suburban theatre owner cannot 
be convinced they are good until the pictures 
have proved their worth. 

"There was a time not long ago when the 
average exhibitor would readily take a chance 
in exploiting a picture which had not had a 
big first run record, but conditions have 
changed. Competition has become too tense. 
No theatre can afford to take a chance even 
for two nights on a picture of unknown 
quality. At least, that is the way they look 
at it." 

"Exhibitors have been educated to a 
point where there is far less overbuying 



president of the M. P. T. O. Kansas- 
Missouri, said. "Most theatre owners 
today have a pretty definite plan on their 
schedules and buy accordingly. They 
have learned what an exhibitor who over- 
buys must go through and they desire 
to avoid such situations. 
"The exchanges, on the other hand, are co- 
operating. They do not desire to oversell a the- 
atre owner. It means bad business for both 
parties concerned and is no credit to either. 
Theatre owners not only are showing more dis- 
crimination in the type of pictures they buy for 
their respective audiences, but also are looking 
miighty sharply to the quantity of pictures they 
contract for. To me it is one of the most 
promising indications I have observed in the 
industry in several years. It means that the 
business is becoming more stabilized — and 
that means everything." 



$6,500 Fire Destroys 
Rose at Anacortes, Wash. 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ANACORTES, WASH., Jan. 10.— Fire, 
which started beneath the stage, gutted the 
Rose theatre here recently, causing an 
estimated damage of $6,500. The loss was 
partly covered by insurance. 



Police Kill Two Bandits After Tip by 

''Woman Scorned;'' Others Steal $1,100 

Two Chicago bandits were shot to death Sunday night, and $1,100 and jewelry 
stolen in Winnipeg last week, in two sensational attacks on proprietors of motion 
picture theatres. 

E. F. Hulquist, owner of the Rosette, was the intended victim of the Chicago 
holdup while on his way to his suburban home with $600 in receipts from Sunday 
performances. A jilted sweetheart of one of the three bandits had informed the 
police and Detective Sergeant Barry and his men were concealed in the railroad 
station when two of the bandits entered to wait for Hulquist. As Hulquist was 
given the order "Hands up!" Barry and his aids sprang forward. With Hulquist 
helplessly shielding most of one bandit, Barry shot at the narrow exposed portion 
with a shot gun, a dozen slugs entering the bandit's heart. The other bandit started 
up a stairway, Bring his revolver at Barry, but the detective killed him with a 
single shot. A third bandit, in a waiting automobile, escaped after crashing into a 
light post. 

In Winnipeg, George F. Law, manager of Universal' s Lyceum, was bound and 
gagged in his office during a performance by two armed men, who obtained $1,000 
from the safe, $100 from Law and the lattefs jewelry, escaping after pursuit by 
armed theatre employes. G. Foster, assistant manager, was backed against the wall 
when he innocently entered during the robbery. 



12 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



Sternherg Wins Director's Prize; 
Badger Second, Stiller Third 

"Underworld" Clinches $10,000 Award and Gold Medal for Maker in 
Competition Over Best Pictures Shown at Paramount 
(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 10.— "Underworld," directed by Josef von Sternberg, 
is the best picture shown at the Paramount theatre in the past year, 
and Sternberg is richer by a check for $10,000 and a medal stamped in 
solid gold. The decision in the Paramount Theatre Medal of Honor Competi- 
tion was made by the selecting company consisting of Jesse L. Lasky, first 
vicepresident of Paramount, Sidney R. Kent, general manager, and Sam Katz, 
president of Publix. 

Mauritz Stiller was famous in Europe as a 
director before he came to the United States 
for his American debut with that production. 

Ned Marin Named Head 
Of First National Studio 
Unit; Leaves for Coast 

Ned Marin, who for nearly a year has been 
assistant to Richard A. Rowland, general and 
production manager of First National, has 
left for the West Coast studios to be manager 
of a production unit. The promotion is due 
to the exceptional aptitude he has shown for 
meeting production problems, according to 
Mr. Rowland in announcing the assignment 
at a farewell luncheon in Mr. Marin's honor 
at the Hotel Roosevelt. 

Marin became associated with First Na- 
tional Pictures more than two years ago, when 
he was appointed sales manager in charge of 
the Western division. He has spent a large 
part of his time at the West Coast Studios 
in active touch with producion. 

Others at the luncheon were Clifford B. 
Hawley, president, Ned Depinet, Samuel 
Spring, Tom Spry and others of his associates 
in the New York office, while also present 
were A. W. Smith, Jr., W. E. Callaway, H. W. 
Adams, Jerome Beatty, C. F. Chandler, Wil- 
liam P. Mullen, Mrs. Florence Strauss, Miss 
Julie Pocock, H. A. Bandy, Ralph W. Brown, 
S. Charles Einfeld, Walter Bberhardt, J. Loeb, 
A. Barlow, Walter Lindlar, Charles Kemke, 
Charles Baily, Joe Kelly, S. Shernow, C. C. 
Danehy, Lvnde Denig, James Cunniff, and 
Jules Levy. 

''Patent Leather Kid'' 

Brings Fight for Seats 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

TOLEDO, Jan. 10. — Patrons at the 
Pantheon, the first regular motion picture 
house to show "The Patent Leather Kid," 
fought to get inside the theatre and when 
they were inside, they fought for seats, during 
the running of the picture at which time the 
house did record business, according to an- 
nouncement from John F. Kumler, manager. 

10 Patrons Injured When Plaster Falls; 

Prompt Action Saves 2,000 From Panic 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 

BROOKLYN , Jan. 10. — Falling plaster injured ten persons of an audience of 
2,000 in the Kingsway theatre, combination house, here last Thursday evening, and 
a panic was averted only by the prompt action of the management in turning on 
the lights and by a speech by Sreman Peter Reynolds, who shouted from the 
stage that there was no danger. The piece of plaster, about five £eet in diameter, 
fell near the left side of the main Boor. Several cried their fear that the building 
was collapsing. 

Mrs. Sadie Staub received a fractured hip, the only severe injury. Seven of 
the ten were able to see the remainder of the performance after treatment by 
ambulance surgeons. A man was injured when in trying to run out over the top 
of the seats he wedged a leg between the seat and back of a chair. Firemen released 
him with screwdrivers. 



CLARENCE BADGER won the second 
prize — $5,000 — for direction of Clara Bow 
in "It." Third prize — $2,500 — ^went to Mauritz 
Stiller, who made 
"Hotel Imperial," 
starring Pola Negri. 

The competition for 
1927 was announced 
first in November, 
1926, by Lasky and 
the awards are based 
on quality of produc- 
tion, cost and direc- 





Josef von Sternberg 




Clarence Badger 

tional excellence. The 
aim is to stimulate 
ability among direc- 
tors of other than 
special productions. 

"Underworld" has 
as its principal play- Mauritz stiller 

ers George Bancroft, 

Evelyn Brent, Fred Kohler and Clive Brook. 
The pitcure won stardom for Bancroft. Van 
Sternberg is the man who created "The Sal- 
vation Hunters." He was born in Vienna. 
His work in "Underworld" won for him the 
assignrnent to direct Emil Jannings in "The 
Last Command." 

"It," with Clara Bow as the star, has An- 
tonio Moreno as the lead. Clarence Badger 
did his first motion picture work in 1915, 
with the Mack Sennett studios. He is now 
engaged in filming Miss Bow's next Para- 
mount picture, "Red Hair." 

"Hotel Imperial" is a World War romance. 



Beaucoup Punch Wanted, 
He Quits ze Film; Sued 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

PARIS, Jan. 10.— Frank Pollack, 
formerly a mere star actor at the 
Comedie Francaise, was Gattered 
when a big French motion picture 
company wanted him to act in a Sim. 
He was to appear in a prize fight 
scene. Frank did not know that his 
opponent was a former heavyweight 
champion. This fact was disclosed 
soon after he recovered from a 
knockout punch. Then Frank refused 
to continue in the picture, and now 
the producer is suing him. Frank says 
his face was ruined. The court asks 
for time to consider the case. 



Will Issue Handbook on 
Foreign Arbitration Law 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 10.— Publication is an- 
nounced by the American Arbitration Asso- 
ciation of a new international handbook on 
commercial arbitration by the International 
Chamber of Commerce, in honor of the late 
Anson W. Burchard, first president of the 
arbitration association. 

The commercial arbitration procedure for 
each country will be described first in separate 
pamphlet form, in order to be readily available 
to business men engaged in foreign trade. The 
first instalment of the handbook describing 
"Commercial Arbitration Under Swiss Law," 
has just been received by the association. 
When the borchures for all countries are is- 
sued they will be combined and published in 
bound volume form as a complete manual on 
the commercial arbitration laws of the world. 
The completed volume, as well as the separate 
pamphlets, will be published in English, French 
and German. 

Bill to End Censorship 

to Follow Smith's Plea 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ALBANY, Jan. 10. — Motion picture cen- 
sorship repeal will again become one of the 
big issues before the New York State leg- 
islature, which convened last week. A bill 
will be introduced at once, probably by 
Attorney Louis Cucillier of New York City, 
a member of the lower house, calling for 
the repeal of the censorship law July 1. 
The bill will be a Democratic measure, at 
least in the lower house, although it is 
understood that efforts will be made to 
have a Republican senator introduce the 
bill in the upper house, as this would insure 
support from both Republicans and Demo- 
crats and there would be no splitting along 
party lines. 

Butterfield Manager 

Has Long Experience 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ADRIAN, Mich., Jan. 10. — Ellsworth 
Hamer, who succeeds Kenneth Tallmadge as 
manager of the Butterfield theatre properties 
here, has been engaged in the theatre business 
for more than 20 years and has had consid- 
erable experience before the footlights as well 
as behind the manager's desk. 



Crosland Fined $50 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 10.— Alan Crosland, 
Warner Brothers director, was fined $50 in 
Traffic Court last Friday for speeding. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



13 



Higher B. O. Net Up to Producer 

Must Have Better Films, 
Say N.Y. State Showmen 

Many Will Book Only Best Pictures During Summer — 
Others to Pay More Attention to the Comedies 

[By Special Correspondent of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World] 

ALBANY, Jan. 10. — The whole solution, or at least 90 per cent of it, of 
ways and means that can be adopted to increase theatre receipts during 1928, 
lies in the hands of the producers of the pictures that will be shown, if one is 
to judge from remarks of exhibitors of Albany and Troy. And these exhib- 
itors were not backward in discussing the proposition, keen and alert for any 
suggestions that might come through Exhibitors Herald and Moving 
Picture World or other channels that might add a dollar to their box office 
returns. 

Are Many Tiring of Pictures? 

It is a subject that stands pre-eminent today in these two cities, just as it 
does in every other city and village where a motion picture theatre is located. 
Some exhibitors in Albany and Troy are fairly frank in admitting that they 
have come to the opinion that a whole lot of people these days are rather 
tiring of pictures and do not show the same zest and enthusiasm in seeking 
out this form of entertainment as they did a couple of years ago. 
What can I do to increase my receipts in will be coupled with his picture programs. 




Exhibitors are awaiting with interest the 
first production of "Paramount's glorious 
young lovers," the new starring team of 
Fay Wray and Gary Cooper. "The Legion 
of the Condemned," their £rst picture, 
now is being completed. Miss Wray 
was "discovered" by Erich von Stroheim. 
Cooper went to Hollywood two years 
ago as a commercial artist. 

Con tingen tLaws May 
Make or Break Films 
Says French Writer 

"The question of the 'contingent,' continues 
to arouse arguments in motion picture 
circles," says an article in Le Temps, a Pari- 
sian newspaper. 

"To produce and release a 'home produc- 
tion' is represented as a punishment, a penali- 
zation and a sacrifice. American films only 
can be used to make up profitable programs, 
not intellectual, but quite sufficient for the 
masses. There lies the whole problem and all 
the laws of the world cannot change it. . . . 

"If the security which our producers expect 
from it (a contingent law) leads them to fall 
asleep on account of their success, mathema- 
tically certain, this law will have delivered 
the death blow to an industry already in 
agony. You can't write the history of an 
art with decrees and customs regulations. If 
our 'protectionists' don't understand it and 
curl up lazilv behind a defensive wall which 
they have built up, they will never wake up." 



..99 



Casanova," "Napoleon* 
to Be Released by M-G-M 

( special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 10.— "Casanova" and 
"Napoleon," two new French films, the first 
of which was produced by Louis Nalpas, di- 
rector of a foreign organization controlled by 
Jean Sapene, publisher of "Le Matin" a 
Parisian newspaper, and the second of which 
was made abroad by Abel Gance, will be 
released during 1928 by M-G-M. 



1928? That's the question these exhibitors 
would like to have answered, realizing, as they 
do, that overhead has gone sky high in many 
ins'tances and that they have been -forced to 
pay more and more for the pictures they are 
showing. 

C. H. Buckley, owner of the Leland and 
the Clinton Square theatres in Albany, 
and one of the foremost exhibitors in this 
part of New York state, declared that the 
answer rested almost entirely in the hands 
of the producers and that such answer 
must be in the way of pictures that pro- 
vide greater entertainment than many of 
those that have been shown during the 
year just closed. And right here it must 
be said that C. H. Buckley is not afraid 
to use advertising in the newspapers and 
elsewhere and that he /mis mainiained an 
unfailing policy of a 25-cent admission no 
matter how costly the picture he has 
played. 

Uly S. Hill, managing director of the Stan- 
ley houses in Albany and Troy, a total of 
seven, says the past year has been a good one 
from a business standpoint and that he in- 
tends to keep on following the same policy, 
the showing of the best pictures obtainable, 
good music, courtesy and service for the pat- 
rons. But Hill goes a bit further for 1928 
and admits that later on he may add presen- 
tation acts, even though these do cost a pretty 
penny, as he realizes that last year such acts 
drew packed houses to the Mark Strand in 
Albany. 

Wants Diversified Bill 

Joe Saperstein, manager of Harmanus 
Bleecker Hall in Albany, is a firm believer in 
a diversified bill and will search far and wide 
during 1928 for amateur acts, for dance fan- 
tasies and similar forms of entertainment that 



Harry Hellman, owner of the Paramount and 
Royal theatres in Albany, is planning to give 
more entertainment for the admission price 
charged. This same procedure will be followed 
by Jake Rosenthal, of the Rose in Troy, des- 
pite the fact that seemingly he reached the 
limit a week or so ago,' when, in addition to 
his picture program, he provided no less than 
ten amateur acts, and not content with this, 
threw in three or four door prizes. 

Incidentally, it would not be such a bad 
procedure if more theatre owners spent a bit 
of money and provided better ventilation for 
their houses. 

Other exhibitors said they intend to give 
more thought and care to the booking of their 
short comedies, which go a considerable way 
in providing entertainment and so often of 
late have left the patron rather disgusted and 
disgruntled, because of their almost utter lack 
of entertainment. 

Book Best Films for Summer 

And now here's a thought that has come 
from several exhibitors. That is that during 
1928 they will use the best pictures obtainable 
throughout the summer. It worked out ex- 
cellently in 1927, bringing thousands of dol- 
lars to theatres, whose owners formerly threw 
up their hands in April or May and cried out 
that there was no earthly reason why they 
should spend perfectly good money for high 
class pictures to be shown during the summer 
when people were out of town, or enjoying 
automobiles, or inclined to remain on their 
own front porches. But one or two of the 
exhibitors in these two cities are gam'blers 
enough to take a chance, and lo and behold 
the people flocked to these theatres in a way 
that made many other exhibitors rub their 
eyes in sheer wonderment and vow to do like- 
wise in mid-1928. 



Venezuelans Like Pictures 

WASHINGTON. — Motion pictures are a popular 
amusement in Venezuela, reports Commercial At- 
tache Halbert E. Watkins, Caracas, to the department 
of commerce. Theatres are filled at every perform- 
ance, especially on Sundays and other holidays. 



Prologue to *'King of Kings" Exonerates 

Jews, Announces B'nai B'rith President 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 
NEW YORK, Jan. 10. — As a result of protests about the present version of 
"King of Kings," Cecil B. DeMille, the producer, will add a special prologue before 
the picture is given any more road showings which places the entire blame for the 
crucifixion on Caiaphas, the high priest, "and other hirelings of the Roman empire." 

This is announced by Alfred M. Cohen of Cincinnati, international president of 
the independent order of B'nai B'rith, the organization which led in denouncing 
the film as "unfair to Jews" and "an instigator of prejudice." 



14 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



TO WORLD READERS TO HERALD READERS 

Service departments of MOVING PICTURE WORLD and EXHIBITORS HERALD will be found on the following pages of this issue of 
EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOVING PICTURE WORLD: 

Page 

"Selling the picture to the Public" 40 "The Theatre" 

"Through the Box Office Window" 38 "Service Talks" 

"Quick Reference Picture Chart" 45 "Available Attractions" 

"Better Projection" 29 "Better Projection" 

"Little Pictures with the Big Punch" 27 "The Short Feature" 

"Hollywood" 24 "Hollywood," by Ray Murray 

"Straight from the Shoulder Reports" 51 "What the Picture Did for Me" 

"Live News from Coast to Coast".... 28 "Live News from Coast to Coast" 

"Stage and Pit" 30 "Presentation Acts" 



VoYget the Clocks Says Sewnigy 
Exponent of 19-Hour Day 

Supervisor of All Universal Theatres Operating Out of Milwaukee Ran 
386-Seat House Only Seven Years Ago 
[By Special Correspondent of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World] 

MILWAUKEE, Jan. 10. — Here is a record for some of the young bloods 
of theatre management to aim at. Seven years ago operating a 386 
seat house, and today supervisor of a chain whose combined seating 
capacity is 15,000, with an expected increased of 5,000 within the next three 
months. Louis G. Sewnig, who holds this record, is only 45 and is supervisor 
of all Universal theatres operating out of the Milwaukee office. 

SEVEN years is a rather short time in 
which to have acquired such a position 
and so Sewning was asked for some tips 
for the younger fel- 



Re-Takes 




Louis G, Sewnig 



lows in the business. 
Here is Sewning's 
hunch: "Be on the 
job at all times, and 
don't be afraid to 
put in extra time. 
Never look at the 
clock. See that the 
work which you 
have set for that 
particular day is all 
cleaned up at night." 
Sewnig adds that his 
wife has been re- 
sponsible to a great 
degree for his suc- 
cess, but more of 
this later. 

It was in 1920 that Sewnig operated the 
Crown theatre at Calumet, Mich. This was 
a 386 seat house, and he engaged in other 
business besides managing the theatre. He 
figured out that theatre consolidation would 
be the trend. So in May, 1920, Sewnig sold 
the Crown and came to Milwaukee as man- 
ager of the Murray, then under the direc- 
tion of Silliman, who operated four other 
neighborhood houses in Milwaukee. This 
was a 740 seat house and besides managing 
it he handled film for the other four houses, 
and helped in the office at bookkeeping 
work. 

He managed the Jackson and Juneau 
theatres, both opeated by Silliman, and then 
the Riviera was turned over to him. This 
house had fallen down somewhat in its re- 
ceipts, but the first year under Sewnig's 
management there was an increase of 35 
per cent, and 50 per cent the second year. 
How was this accomplished? The manager 
must make his personality felt by the com- 
munity, Sewnig says. It means meeting 
people and getting acquainted with busi- 
ness men and finding out what type of pic- 
tures they like. 

Mrs. Sewnig Adds Personality 

And here is where Mrs. Sewnig comes in. 
There may be many a theatre man who 
thinks that a woman, especially when that 
woman happens to be his wife, is rather 



an unnecessary commodity about a theatre. 
Sewnig does not think so. They have no 
children and every night when Sewnig went 
to the theatre, Mrs. Sewnig went along. 
She was especially kind to the children and 
they came to know here as a second mother. 
Parents sent their children to the theatre 
because they knew they were being well 
taken care of, and Mrs. Sewnig's warm per- 
sonality added a host of friends. 

Sewnig during this time did not hesitate 
to work 19 and 20 hours a day and he is 
still doing it. Today he is regarded as a 
father by the younger managers on the 
Milwaukee Theatre Circuit. He constantly 
is visiting their houses and giving them 
expert advice where needed. In September, 
1926, Universal took over Silliman's chain 
of ten houses and Sewnig managed the 
Riviera until May 1, 1927, when in addition 
he was named assistant general manager of 
the circuit. On August 28, 1927, Sewnig 
was named supervisor of theatres and Rob- 
ert L. Gross was named manager of the 
Riviera. Gross is a protege of Sewnig and 
the theatre remains one of the best paying 
houses on the circuit. 

Says Big Houses Care for Small 
When Sewnig entered the industry few 
people though the business would reach its 
present scope. In those days, a person 
rented an old store, took out the front, 
put in chairs, and perhaps ran a small bal- 
cony around the top, and he had a show- 
house. "And the party would have to make 
a deposit when he took out the front of 
the store," he said, "so that the owner 
would be sure it was replaced when he left." 

Sewnig says the large theatres take care 
of the smaller ones. 



Cleveland Exhibitor Vote 
Favors Brookhart Bill 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

CLEVELAND, Jan. 10.— A resolution fa- 
voring the passage by Congres;s of the Brook- 
hart bill abolishing block booking, was voted 
last week by members of the Cleveland Mo- 
tion Picture Exhibitors Association. 

The resolution calls upon the members to 
use their screens in educating the public. 



HOLLYWOOD. — Well, you exhibitors 
ought to be happy now. You're getting 
two big magazines squeezed into one. With a 
lot of new features and all for the old price. 
Yes, sir, 1928 is bargain year for showmen. 

* * * 

It looks as though it was going to be a good 
year for the alienists too, with several new 
murder cases on tap. A fair alienist with a 
new name for "brain fever" can occupy the 
public prints and the witness stand for sev- 
eral days and make himself enough to build 
a modest $50,000 bungalow. 

* * * 
New Car Fever 

There are so many new cars on the market 
now a fellow can ride free for the next six 
months with demonstrating salesmen if he's 
in good health and in search of thrills. 

* * * 

Ho for Golf! 

It must miake the rabid golf fans back East 
gnaw their brassie shafts when they read 
about the ideal golf weather we're having 
here in California, while they're hugging 
steam radiators. 

Today's Fable: Once there was an extra 
who didn't think he could make a better pic- 
ture than his director, if he only had two 
hundred and fifty thousand. 

* * * 

Another Fable : Once upon a time there 
was a critic who didn't think there was too 
many closeups in all pictures and could make 
'em better with one hand tied behind his 
back. (He died in 1900.) 

* * * 
Believe It or Not 

Holljrwood has a real curiosity. A picture 
actress who has refused to accept alimony 
from her divorced husband. 

* * * 
Good Stuff 

A Los Angeles jury the other day acquitted 
a bootlegger after it had sampled the "evi- 
dence" and didn't leave any in the bottle. 

Not Broken 

How many New Year resolutions remain in- 
tact this week? Yes, we bent a few of ours. 

* * * 
Famous Last Words 

"I know it's the real stuff. Santa Claus 
brought it." 

* * * 

Gee, Meadows, I'm all excited. Got to at- 
tend the WASPS doings at the Roosevelt ho- 
tel tonight. Good night if I make a break. 

— R. M. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



15 



St. Louis Sets Seating Record 

Capacity Per Capita Held 
Double New York City's 



List of Theatres 
in St. Louis 



Skouras Brothers Enterprises, Inc. 

1. Ambassador, 3,000 seats. De luxe firit 
run house. 2. Missonrl, 3,558. Da luxe first 
run. 

Skouras Brothers and William Goldnum 

3. Grand Central, 1,850. Closed. 4. Kings, 

I, 370. Second mn and some Taudevllle. S. 
Kings Theatre Airdome, 1,370. 6. West End 
Lrrie, 1,030. Second ran. 7. Lyric Skydome, 
3,500. 

St. Louis Amusement Company, Skouras 
Brothers and Harry Koplar 

8. Arco, 1,448. Closed. 9. Capitol, 929. 
Second run. 10. Lyric, 555. Subsequent run. 

II. Grand-Florissant, 1,850. Pictures and 
vaudeville. Airdome seats 2,626. 12. Gravols, 
1,116. Pictures. Some vaudeville on Sunday. 
13. Llndell, 1,745. Picture* and vaudeville. 
Airdome seats 1,605. 14. Manchester, 1,539. 
Pletares. Some vaudeville on Sundays. Air- 
dome seats 1,125. 15. Novelty, 1,086. Pic- 
tures. Some vaudeville Sundays. 16. Compton 
Airdome, 1,000. Same policy as Novelty. 

• • • 

17. Pershing, 1,831. Closed. 18. Shenan- 
doah, 1,740. Pictures and vaudeville. Air- 
dome seats 1,840. 19. Arsenal, 657. Pictures. 
20. Lafayette, 880. Pictures. 21. Rnssel air- 
dome, 1,860. 22. Maffitt, 1,280. Pictures. 
Some vaudeville Sundays. 23. North Grand, 
675. Closed. 24. Pageant, 1,400. Pictures. 
25. Crystal Airdome, 2,000. 26. Shaw, 1,140. 
Picttires. Some vaudeville Sundays. 27. Tlvoli, 
University City, 1,400. Pictures and vaudevills. 
28. Webster, 935. Pictures. Airdome seats 
1,750. 

29. Woodland, 1,487. Pictures. Some vaude- 
ville Sundays. Airdome seats 1,490. 30. Mi- 
kado, 1,608. Pictures and some vaudeville. 
31. Montgomery, 1,424. Pictuers and some 
vaudeville Sundays. Airdome seats 1,381. S2. 
Virginia, 881. Pictures and some vaudeville 
Sundays. Airdome seats 1,250. 33. Anbert, 
1,599. Pictures. Some vaudeville Sundays. 
Airdome seats 2,200. 34. Cinderella, 1,834. 
Pictures and some vaudeville. Airdome seats 
2,200. 35. Congress, 1,096. Closed. 36. 
Chippewa, 575. Closed. 37. Hi-Folnte, 756. 
Pictures. Some vaudeville Sundays. Airdome 
seats 910. 38. Klngsland, 1,600. Pictures. 
Some vaudeville Sundays. Airdome seats 1,200. 

• • • 

39. Columbia, 1,200. Pictures. Some vaude- 
ville Sundays. 40. Granada, 2,200. De luxe 
second run. 31. Powhattan, Maplewood, 1,200. 
Pictures. Airdome seats 1,500. 42. Maplo- 
wood, Mplaewood, 1,200. 43. Oiark, Webster 
Groves. Pictures. 

Picture theatres in St. Louis and sub- 
urbs other than those in u^ich Skouras 
Brothers and associates are interested. 

44. Redwing, S96. 45. Cherokee, 1,299. 
46. Ivory, 835. 47. Melba, 1,190. Airdome, 
1,500. 48. Michigan, 1,200. 49. Lldel, 552. 
Closed. 50. Marguerite, 590. Closed. AH 
owned by Fred Wehrenberg. 

51. Rainbow, 363. 52. RlvoH, 689. S3. 
Palace, 725. 54. Astor, 285. 55. Majestic, 
975. 56. Senata, 882. All owned by C. Gold- 
man and J. Laventhal, et al. 

• * • 

57. Retina, 279. Airdome seats 770. 58. 
While Way, 385. Airdome seats 684. S9. 
Comet, 690. 60. Easton-Taylor, 580. 61. Jest- 
A-Mere, 8S«. All owned by Tommy Jamas. 

62. Ashland, 790. Airdome seats 790. 63. 
Criterion, 654. 64. Newslead, 665. All owned 
by Charles & Nick Fiorita. 

65. New Shenandoah, 1,381. Airdome seats 
900. 66. American, 704. Airdome seats 650. 
67. Family, 653. 68. New Family, 537. 69. 
Peerless, 697. All owned by Rex Amusement 
Co. Airdome seats 682. 

70. Casino, 318. John Karzin owner. 71. 
Lincoln, 592. Karzin. 72. Olympla, 823, 
Karzin. 73. Mogler, 1.235. Joe Moeler owner. 
Airdome seats 1,778. 74. Excello, 689. Mo-ler. 
75. Bremen, 1,145. Mogler. 76. Booker Wash- 
ington, 909. C. H. Turpin, owner. 77. Bite, 
950. Ritz Amusement Co. 78. Kins Bee, 
1,291. Mike Nash. Airdome seats 1,297. 

79. toew's State, 3,073. Loew's St. Louis 
Amusement & Realty Co. owner. Loew a Cir- 
cuit operator. 80. Union, 1,147. Sanford 
Amnsement Co. owner. 81. Baden, 939. Kai- 
man Brothers. Airdome seats l.OM. 82. 
Lowell, 689. Kalman Brothers. 83. O Fallon, 
898. Kaiman Brothers. Airdome seats 1.520. 

84. Broadway, 501. Western Photo Plav Co. 

85. Delmonte, 1,588. Closed. 86. Grand Opera 
House, 2,255. Pictures and Orpheum vaude- 

(Continued en page 49) 



Total of 87 Motion Picture Houses Can Seat 90,737^ 
While Three Combination Houses Add 8,264 More 

[By Special Correspondent of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World] 
ST. LOUIS, Jan. 10. — "St. Louis was making motion pictures when Holly- 
wood was a vacant lot!" This was a favorite expression of the late Eddie 
Dustin, one of the pioneers of production, distribution and exhibition in the 
the Middlewest. And while this city no longer holds a dominant position in 
the production of film thrillers it maintains a commanding place in the exhibi- 
tion of the cinema, and today supports probably more motion picture theatre 
seats in proportion to population than any other large city in America — almost 
twice as many seats per capital as New York City. 

97 Picture Theatres, 90,373 Seats 

Today there are operating in St. Louis 97 motion picture houses with a total 
capacity of 90,373 seats, while three vaudeville houses with 8,264 seats also 
show feature motion pictures. In St. Louis County, in Universal City, Maple- 
wood, Wellston, Webster, Kirkwood and Florissant there are eleven picture 
theatres with a total of 10,450 seats. 



During the summer St. Louis supports 40 
airdromes with a total of 52,527 seats, while 
there are three airdromes in St. Louis 
county with 3,500 seats. 

There are at present 16 motion picture 
houses closed, with a total of 13,989 seats, 
while within recent years nine houses with 
5,013 seats and 11 airdromes seating 10,843 
have been closed permanently. 

Exhibition here has undergone a vast 
transformation in the 21 years since 1906, 
when John Karzin opened the World^s 
Dream theatre at 1314 Market street, the 
first house devoted exclusively to motion 
pictures. Prior to that time pictures had 
been shown in conjunction with penny 
arcades and shooting galleries, while the 
old Columbia at Sixth and St. Charles 
streets had included a reel or so of 
scenics. 

About the time Karzin opened the 
World's Dream, the Dreamland theatre was 
started on South Broadway on the site of 
the present Family theatre. During the 
World's Fair in 1904 motion pictures were 
shown by the Westinghouse Electric Com- 
pany. The same year, French pictures were 
displayed at Delmar Garden on Delmar 
boulevard and the Kirkwood-Ferguson 
street car tracks. 

Bed Sheet Was Screen 

The World's Fair year a man named 
Goldgrabber opened a penny arcade and 
picture house on Franklin avenue. He had 
94 camp chairs, a large bed sheet for a 
screen, and paid Harry Miller, his operator, 
$25 a week for his services and the use of 
one of the original Edison picture projec- 
tors. Later Miller opened a penny arcade 
and picture show at 1528 Market street. 



known as Miller Brothers' Nickel Odeon. 
It had 120 seats and patrons were admit- 
ted through a single store door. It even 
had some real electric lights in front. Kar- 
zin at that time was operating a restaurant 
next door and when Harry Miller sought 
to expand via Karzin's restaurant, he sold 
Karzin a half interest in the theatre and 
arcade for $750. 

Miller was a circus man and in the spring 
he left Karzin to run a show. John did 
all the work and Harry got half the profits. 
This led to a disagreement and the birth of 
St. Louis' first exclusive picture house. 

World's Dream Opened in 1906 

The World's Dream blazened forth Oct. 
17, 1906. It had 140 folding chairs and 
standing room for 200 additional. Karzin 
rented his film in Chicago for $25 a week 
and occasionally paid $35 for a headliner. 
Today the big first run houses here pay 
$5,000 to $6,000 a week for some pictures. 

Karzin's first operator was paid $12 a 
week, while his "barker" was given $15 a 
week. Later a piano player or a mechan- 
ical piano provided music and next the 
illustrated singing of cigaret tenors and am- 
bitious sopranos was featured. 

Ten Shows Finally Barred 

Following closely came the tent shows. 
Karzin, Mike Nash, Harry Koplar, William 
Goldman, Joe Mogler and Fred Wehren- 
berg were the pioneers. Nash had opened 
an odeon at Sixteenth and Franklin avenue 
soon after the World's Dream was started. 
These tent shows seated up to 3,000 and 
were heated by large cannon coal stoves. 
Boards were laid in the aisles to keep the 
patrons' feet dry until they reached their 
(Continued on page 49) 



Kansas City Firm Acquires Half Interest 

in 24 Universal Houses for $1,000,000 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 
KANSAS CITY, Jan. 10. — A $1,000,000 deal, in which the Midland Theatre and 
Realty company of Kansas City acquired one-half interest in 24 theatres in Mis- 
souri and Kansas from the Universal Chain Theatrical Enterprises, Inc., was com- 
pleted here last week. The Midland company is interested in the Loew's Midland 
theatre, Kansas City's $4,000,000 house. 

The 24 theatres, five of which are in Kansas City, are to go immediately under 
the Midland management. According to M. B. Shanbeig, managing director of 
Loew's Midland, the theatres will be operated from Kansas City in conjunction 
with the Midland's present circuit of theatres. Universal desired Midland manage- 
ment, which would afford local management of the theatres involved, said Shanberg. 



16 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



Press in South Lends a Hand on 
Bonafide Theatre Projects 

It's a Paradise for the House Representative Who "Plays the Game" 
and Observes Rules of Southern Hospitality 

[By Special Correspondent of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World] 

SAN ANTONIO, Jan. 10.— "A Press Representative's Paradise"— This 
might be the expression of anyone new to the ways of the South upon 
investigating the condition existing between Southern papers and thea- 
trical advertising men — ^but there is a reason for everything, and the reason 
for the liberality of Southern! papers in cooperating with theatres is easily 
explained. 



IN three cities of Texas, with the right 
kind of approach, the press representa- 
tive can get almost anything within reason 
that he asks for, and the newspaper seems 
to feel honored that it is being taken into 
confidence — but the press representative is 
the thing. He must observe all the rules of 
Southern hospitality. He must be, above 
all, courteous, without a trace of ego, 
bluster, or he will suffer the consequences. 
He must be sociable — willing to fraternize 
with the boys on the paper, and he must 
back up what he says with proof — or look 
out the next time he tries to pull a stunt! 

The three cities with newspapers that are 
especially willing to work for the good of 
the theatre with "free space" are Dallas, 
Houston, and San Antonio. Press repre- 
sentatives in these cities, if they are real 
men, not afraid to work, and openhanded 
at all times, need not worry about the co- 
operation from the local papers — they will 
get it. 

Specific incidents of remarkable co-oper- 
ation might be cited to show that Texas is 
an open field for newspaper exploitation. 
In one instance, the San Antonio Light co- 
operated with the Texas theatre there in 
putting over the "Young America" Oppor- 
tunity contest to such an extent that the 
popular verdict was that the publicity de- 
rived by the Texas from this national stunt 
was greater than that obtained by any other 
theatre on the entire Publix circuit. 



run for two weeks, awarding the two 

winners four weeks on Interstate and 

Publix circuits in Texas. 

Space is cheap in the South — the news- 
papers necessarily must make their rates 
low — and they understand that the theatres 
could get the same results, by agreement 
with each other — if they all used small 
spaces — hence the hearty co-operation in 
return for ample space buying. 

The Houston Chronicle, Press and Post 
Dispatch stand almost on a par when it 
comes to working with the theatres in that 
city. A daily column for theatrical news 
is carried by each paper, and any special 
stunt that warrants it readily crashes a good 
story and cut. Bud Burmaster, publicity di- 
rector for Publix in Houston, and other 
press agents there, find the papers ready to 
co-operate with them in contests, stunts, 
and exploitation campaigns at almost any 
time. 

The News and Express in San Antonio, 
when a stunt is presented to them, go over 
its worthiness with the press representative, 
and if a real good can be derived from it 
by either the theatre or the paper — it goes. 
In Dallas, the Morning News, reputed to be 
the most representative morning paper in 
the entire South; the Times Herald and the 
Dallas Dispatch all cooperate to a great ex- 
tent with the theatres. 

Papers Don't Play Favorites 



Five Months of Exploitation 

Double trucks, half page layouts, myriads 
of cuts and stories, and special features 
were run in the paper, starting three weeks 
in advance of the contest, until the stage 
show had played at the Texas, almost five 
months later. During the time that the 
company was on the road, the Light pub- 
lished a story each week on the incidents 
of interest that befell Miss San Antonio, 
keeping the Texas in the limelight at all 
times. 

And at the present writing, the "Light" 
is co-operating with the Majestic and 
Texas theatres in San Antonio, in putting 
on a child comic characterization con- 
test, to select the San Antonio child who 
can imitate best one of the "Light's" 
comic characters. Four weeks of big 
publicity stories were given the contest 
in advance, and the contest proper will 



As a general rule, the papers do not play 
favorites with the theatres. They attempt 
to hand out a fair dealing to them all, and 
one instance in San Antonio recently shows 
the' spirit in which the papers and the show- 
houses work. The Light, which, by the 
way, originated the comic contest men- 
tioned in the foregoing, wanted a theatre 
to go in on it. The three leading theatres' 
press men were notified, and a meeting was 
held with the editor-in-chief. He explained 
his proposition, and put it up to the thea- 
tres to offer the way to stage the contest. 
The theatre that offered the best sugges- 
tions was to be awarded the right to stage 
it. The Texas and Majestic entered into 
such hearty competition that a plan was 
formulated whereby the contest would be 
held in both houses. Which shows the fair- 
ness and square dealing of the papers in 
San Antonio. 



January 14, 1928 

National Circuit of 
Independent Houses 
Planned by Sam Sax 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 10.— Sam Sax, president 
of Gotham, now has plans underway for the 
organization of a national circuit of indepen- 
dent motion picture theatres on the lines of 
the original First National circuit. 

"The idea has proved to be economically 
sound," states Sax, "as it insures the theatre 
owner a supply of pictures of a calibre deter- 
mined by himself, and insures the producer 
an adequate outlet for his product." 



Negative Exports Grow 
To 18,815,776 Feet in 
October; Value $461,535 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 10.— Steadily in- 
creasing exports of positive motion pictures 
are shown by statistics just compiled by the 
department of commerce showing shipments in 
October of 18,815,776 feet, valued at $461,535, 
as compared with 18,152,033 feet, valued at 
$446,440, in September, and 15,407,639 feet, 
valued at $452,484, in October, 1926. 

October shipments of negatives also showed an 
increase, being 737,293 feet, valued at $83,277, com- 
pared with 718,019 feet, valued at $81,427, in Sep- 
tember, and 331,605 feet, valued at $112,607, in the 
preceding October. Raw stock exports for the month 
were 4,741,655 feet, valued at $110,510, compared 
with 4,552,204 feet, valued at $122,681, in Septem- 
ber, and 3,703,296 feet, valued at $82,554, in October, 
1926. 

There were also exports to non-contiguous terri- 
tories amounting to 1,291,893 feet, valued at $15,354, 
in October, against 1,798,864 feet, valued at $20,386, 
in September, and 974,465 feet, valued at $12,573, in 
October of the preceding year. 

Total exports of films were: October, 1927, 
25,586,617 feet, valued at $670,676; September, 
1927, 25,221,120 feet, valued at $670,934; and 
October, 1926, 20,417,005 feet, valued at 
$660,218. 

Lankford Bluenose Bill 
"Un-Christian", Declares 
Washington Clergyman 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 10.— "If the Lank- 
ford blue law bill, pending before Congress, 
is passed, the church will become a stench in 
the nostrils of good people, and the citizens 
of Washington will turn in disgust from the 
pulpits," Rev. Henry M. Lawson declared in 
a meeting of the National Association Opposed 
to Blue Laws here recently. 

"Must we have a condition that allows 
the church people, right or wrong, to dictate 
to the lawmakers of the nation?" asked Rev. 
Lawson. 

Theatre Bandit Suspects 
Slug Guards in Jailbreak 

Five Chicago bandits en route Monday 
from a courtroom to their cells fell upon 
their guards and an elevator operator in an 
attempt to escape. One guard was slugged 
with a "billy" made of tin foil and string and 
the others were held at the point of a toy 
pistol. The men were captured in the eleva- 
tor after being threatened with death by sev- 
eral deputy sheriffs who came to the rescue 
of the guards. All five of the bandits had 
been arraigned on charges of holding up Jesse 
V. Hogan, manager of the Stratford theatre 
in Chicago last April in which the bandits ob- 
tained $4,319. 



$200,000 Fire Destroys Theatre Building 
in Hamilton, O., Following an Explosion 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 

HAMILTON, O., Jan. 10. — Fire, following a teniae explosion, completely 
destroyed the Jefferson theatre and the office and store building included in the 
block, last Wednesday, causing a loss of $200,000. The theatre, which was owned 
by the Jewel Photoplay Company and D. A. Loeb, will be rebuilt, according to 
John A. Schwalm, president of the former company. Work will be started at 
once, according to Mr. Schwalm. In the meantime performances will be transferred 
to the Regent a short distance away and owned by the Jewel company. 

The Jefferson, which was named after Joseph Jefferson, the noted actor, was 
erected in 1903 as a community theatre. Tickets for the premier were sold at 
$10 each. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



17 



Film News 
in Pictures 



PICTORIAL SECTION 



Stories Told 
by the Camera 





A Variety of Views 




Frivolity commends this night costume 
of peach chiffon and lace, worn by 
Barbara Kent, Universal player. The 
negligee is double and has a border and 
inserts of lace. 



The brutal side of Michael, suddenly dis- 
closed, comes as a bitter surprise to Olna. 
Estelle Taylor and Antonio Moreno in a 
scene from their First National picture, 
"The Whip Woman." 



Only a lad of five is Yurka Kuls, but 
already he's a skilled horseman. Yurka 
came from Russia with a group of 
Cossacks for M-G-M's "The Cossacks," 
John Gilbert vehicle. 





Saluting Martha Sleeper as Miss February, to mark next month 
as the F B O Jubilee celebration in honor of Joseph P. Ken- 
nedy's second anniversary as president. From left to right: 
Harry Cohen, Los Angeles manager; Miss Sleeper, William 
Le Baron, vicepresident; and Bryant Washburn. 



A curious example of what the Evolutionists call atavism — for 
this ape's a man. He went back to his "ancestral" ways for 
M-G-M's Karl Dane-George K. Arthur comedy, "Monkey Busi- 
ness." Director Edward Sedgwick holds his right arm, while 
Supervisor Harry Rapf holds the other. 



18 



EXfflBITOKS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 





Taking a "truck shot" in the "Sahara" near Guadelupe, Cal. The camera is 
drawn on a runway, permitting the soldiers to be "shot" without passing out 
of the picture, as it were. The scene was for Universal's "The Foreign Legion," 
which co-stars Lewis Stone and Norman Kerry. The director is Eldward Sloman, 
shown wearing a pith helmet. 



Back to the days of the memorable "Miracle 
Man!" Betty Compson and Lon Chaney, who 
are together again in M-G-M's "The Big City," 
Chaney's new vehicle. Miss Compson has the 
feminine lead. 





The warm beauty of Jola Mendez is 
strikingly displayed in this new por- 
trait. F B O is featuring her in 
"Chicago After Midnight." 



Jack Holt, the urbane ranchman, 
has signed to make five Columbia 
pictures next season. His latest Co- 
lumbia is "The Warning." 




As easy to say as to look at is Betty Boyd, 
whose name urges one at once to prefix a cer- 
tain adjective (see above) — and to add ba- 
thetic, for Educational features her in Mermaid 
Comedies. 



Egad, when it comes to urging folks to murder. Director Fred Niblo is not to 

be laughed off! And Noah Beery, too, wants to pass the er stiletto. 

"Zounds, she hesitates!" hisses Lon Poff, while Harry Schultz's "Curses!" 
ascend from the rear. Will Vilma Banky do it? See "Leatherface," a coming 
United Artists production. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



19 





Universal star and breakfast food baron — and a handsome Arabian steed, not 
to mention a curiously uncomfortable-looking buggy. W. K. Kellogg is shown 
greeting Laura La Plante at his Pomona estate, after she had taken an old- 
fashioned, but brief, trip behind a member of his famous stables. Miss La 
Plante's "Finders Keepers" will be released next month. 





Mary Brian, 105 (pounds), commending the 
Five Step to Anna Magruder, 395, possibly 
because dancing vitally concerns space as well 
as time. Both play in Paramount's Field- 
Conklin comedy, "Two Flaming Youths." 



Stardom impends for Fanrell Mac- 
Donald, announces Fox. His initial 
picture will follow the completion of 
"Four Devils" by F. W. Mumau. 



A new camera-study of the gifted 
Marceline Day, M-G-M player. Her 
latest featured role is in Lon Cha- 
ney's "The Big City." 





Answering that troublesome question, "Do screen players have brothers and 
sisters?" Whatever your previous conclusions, above is proof that they do. 
Next to Mary Astor (left) is Isabel Hope, Gloria's sister; then come the brothers 
Hughes, Lloyd and Earl; and then Lois Wilson's sister, Constance. All recently 
gathered for a scene in First National's "Sailors' Wives." 



Norma Shearer, M-G-M star, poised in the 
doorway of her dressing room, which, being 
new and portable, might be called by one 
facetious, her latest vehicle. More seriously, 
her I. V. is "Pullman Partners." 



20 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



Veterans and Youngsters Sharing 
Honors as Albany Showmen 

It's Hard to Decide Exhibitor s Worth by His Age with Such Cases as "Pop" 

Linton and Tony Veiller, 23 

(This is one of a series of articles from correspondents on young and old exhibitors.) 

ALBANY, Jan. 10.— Who makes the better exhibitor, the middleaged or old 
man with his years of experience in buying and showmanship, or the 
, young man perhaps in his twenties, imbued with the enthusiasm of youth 
and ever alert for new ideas in showmanship. 



'T'HIS is a matter of argument. Naturally 
the veteran will not concede for a moment 
that the youngster in the game is the better 
man. And as for the youngster, even though 
he may lack the years of experience, his self- 
confidence and enthusiasm will not permit him 
to concede for an instant that he is at a dis- 
advantage because of his years. 

There are probably two outstanding figures 
in central New York, when one wishes to 
make a comparison along these lines. One of 
these men is that veteran, "Fop" Linton, hale 
and hearty despite the fact that he is probably 
close to 70, a man who has built himself a 
theatre in Utica that stands as a monument to 
pluck and perseverance. Linton entered the 
business so many years ago that he hesitates 
to tell just exactly when he invested his little 
pile in his first projection machine. 

Only two or three years ago Linton 
built a magnificent theatre in Utica, one 
which he hoped would represent his life's 
best efforts. Eleven days later, a fire 
starting in a neighboring store, worked 
its way into the theatre and two hours 
later Linton's house was a mass of 
smoldering ruins. Tears streamed down 
his cheeks as he stood on the curb and 
watched the firemen. 

He_ determined to rebuild. After months 
of toil, of interviews, and of travel, he man- 
aged to get together sufficient in the way of 
money with which to erect the present Olympic 
in Utica. Today. "Pop" Linton is the outstand- 
ing exhibitor in New York state in point of 
years, and as for ability along buying lines 
and in showmanship he has few equals, if any, 
in New York state. 

Tony Veiller Barely 23 

One of the youngest exhibitors in the state 
is Tony Veiller, of the Mark Ritz, in- Albany. 
Barely 23 years of age, Mr. Veiller is han- 
dling the theatre like a veteran. Perhaps this 
is due in a measure to the fact that he comes 
from parents who have made their name in 
the show business. 

His father is Bayard Veiller, a former news- 
paperman, author of "The Thirteenth Chair" 
and "Within the Law," who has written many 
of the best scenarios, and whose show, "The 
Trial of Mary Dugan," is today one of the 
outstanding hits in the legitimate field on 
Broadway. His mother is a well known 
actress and, as for Tony, he entered the show 
business with a newspaper training that has 
added much to his success. 

Tony Veiller is said to be one of the 
cleverest buyers of pictures in central 
New York, and his newspaper advertise- 
ments are widely copied arid contribute 
much to the patronage of the theatre. 
Among the oldtimers, we have such suc- 
cesses as William Smalley, of Cooperstown, 
N. Y., who was at one time the proprietor of 
a milk factory but started in the motion pic- 
ture business as far back as when he was 
obliged to generate his power through an at- 
tachment to an old automobile, as he toured 
the country. Today Smalley has a chain of 
fifteen houses, all located in fair sized villages, 
and as for showmanship, he takes off his hat 
to no one. The ranks of the oldtimers also 
include Louis Buettner, of Cohoes; Lew 
Fischer, of Fort Edward, who has made and 
dropped two or three fortunes in the busi- 



ness but today is on easy street. 

Uly S. Hill, now managing director of the 
Stanley houses in Albany and Troy and at 
one time advance man over the entire United 
States, is in his fifties, and holds his position 
because of the sound judgment that has come 
to him through his years of experience. When 
the Strand company, which later on became 
a part of the Stanley Company of America, 
opened its first theatre in Albany, it selected 
Hill as its manager. 

It was tough going for many months. 
But Hill planned a deliberate campaign 
in his endeavors to get the best people at 
Albany to attend and become acquainted 
with the theatre and the entertainment 
that was being given. It was a long hard 
fight. For many weeks the theatre lost 
money. Finally the turning point came, 
largely through Hill's perseverance and 
the confidence that had been reposed in 
him by not only the owners of the thea- 
tre but also by the residents of the city. 
Perhaps this confidence dates back to the 
time when Hill was connected with another 
house, where roadshows were featured. There 
was one occasion when a mother telephoned 
Hill asking if the show then holding the 
boards was all right for her children to see. 
"No," replied Hill, "do not bring them." 
It so happened that the treasurer of the 
show company was standing beside him at the 
moment. 

"You're one h of a manager," remarked 

the treasurer, visibly nettled at Hill's answer. 
Public Confidence First 

Hill then explained that he desired the con- 
fidence of his friends more than he did any 
business that might come to him through mis- 
representing the show. 

And so it goes. The veterans in the busi- 
ness, perhaps not so clever in devising their 
newspaper advertisements as some of the 
younger ones, can justly lay claim to being 
better exhibitors by reason of their experi- 
ence. The young men unhesitatingly speak for 
themselves. Take your choice. 



Theatre Construction 
To Total $161,938,000 
In 1928, Survey Shows 

Expenditures for theatre construction in the 
United States will reach a total of $161,938,000 
during 1928, according to a survey just com- 
pleted by the Architectural Forum maga- 
zine. A complete story on the forecast with 
illustrations will be carried in next week's 
Better Theatres. 



Patty DuPont Weds 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10.— Sylvanus Stokes, 
Jr., scion of a wealthy Pennsylvania family, 
and Patty DuPont, film actress, were married 
here Saturday. Eric von Stroheim, director, 
was best man, while Mrs. Stroheim stood with 
the bride. 



Short Feature 
Releases 



WEEK OF JANUARY 22 
"Jangle Round Up," Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, one; "Felix 
the Cat in Draggin' the Dragon," Felix the Cat, 
Educational, one; "Wildcat Valley," Tuxedo, Edu- 
cational, two; "The Man Without A Face," No. 2, 
Pathe, two; "The Boy Friend," Fables, Pathe, 
two-thirds; "The Beach Club," Sennett, Pathe, two; 
"Family Frolics," Rice, Pathe, one; "Pathe Review," 
No. 4, Pathe, one; "Topics of the Day," No. 4, 
Timely, Pathe, ona-third. 

WEEK OF JANUARY 29 
"Dog Days — The Sun and the Rain," Outdoor Sketches^ 
Educational, one; "High Strung," Mermaid, Educa- 
tional, two; *'AI1 Set,** Cameo, Educational, one|. 
"The Man Without A Face," No. 3, Pathe, two» 
"The Wandering Minstrel," Fables, Pathe, two- 
thirds, "Love at First Flight," Sennett, Pathe, twof 
"Pathe Review," No. 5, Pathe, one; "Topics of th» 
Day," No. S, Timely, Pathe, one-third. 

WEEK OF FEBRUARY S 

"The Man Without A Face," No. 4, Pathe, two; "Th» 
Cood Ship Nellie," Fables, Pathe, two-thirds i 
"Smiths Army Life," Sennett, Pathe, two; "Versa- 
tility," Rice, Pathe, one; "Pathe Review," No. 6» 
Pathe, one; "Topics of the Day," No. 6, Timely, 
Pathe, one-third. 

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 12 

**Mistake8 Will Happen,** Snappy, Universal, one; "Th» 
Vanishing Rider,** No. 5, Adventure, Universal, two; 
**The Prince and the Papa,** Special, Universal, two ; 
**MaD of Letters,** Stem Bros., Universal, two; 
*'Buckskin Days,** Western, Universal, two ; **The 
Man Without A Face,*' No. 5, Pathe, two; "Every- 
body's Flying,** Fables, Pathe, two-thirds; "Flying 
Elephants,** Roach, Pathe, two-thirds; **Life Savers,** 
Record, Pathe, two-thirds; **Over the Bounding Blue 
With Will Rogers," C. S. Clancy, Pathe, one; 
**Pathe Review,** No. 7, Pothe, one; **Topics of the 
Day,*' No. 7, Timely, Pathe, one-third. 



10 and 15 Cent Houses in 
California Wait 90 Days 
After Downtown Showing 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 10.— All 10 and 15 
cent admission theatres hereabouts will have 
to wait 90 days after the downtown run of a 
picture before they can play it, according to 
a new ruling of the zoning committee of the 
M. P. T. O. of Southern California. For 
theatres charging a general admission of 20 
cents it will be held back 30 days after the 
city opening. The new ruling becomes effec- 
tive February 1 and new contracts are now 
being made on this basis. 

At a meeting of the Board of Trade of the 
Film Exchanges, at which Ben Berenstein, 
president of the M. P. T. O. of Southern 
California, and J. H. Goldberg, booking man- 
ager of West Coast Theatres, Inc., were pres- 
ent, resolutions recommending certain modifi- 
cations in the zoning system were read and 
adopted last week. 

All contracts will hereafter stipulate that 
they were taken based upon the new zoning 
and clearance plan of the Film Board of 
Trade, effective as of January 1, and applii- 
cable February 1, 1928. Each branch manager 
has been given copies of the resolutions. 



Albany Couple Get Repaid 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ALBANY, Jan. 10.— Mr. and Mrs. Crest, 
of Watertown, who had charges of grand 
larceny preferred against S. Fennimore 
Hoffman, motion picture promoter of New 
York, have received $750 from him, in pay- 
ment of alleged debts. 



INCORPORATIONS 

ALBANY.— Only four companies Ineorporated In 
New York the past week. They are: Okun Theatrical 
Enterprises, Inc., S4,50Ot Veils, Inc., $50,000; Film 
Center, Ine., and Artex Studio, Inc. 



Ray Griffith to Wed 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10.— Raymond Grif- 
fith and Bertha Mann, Paramount players, 
have taken out a marriage license here. Their 
romance began nine years ago when both were 
on the stage. 



January 14, 1928 EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



21 



THE STUDIO 



Incorporated in this department of Exhibitors Herald is the Moving Picture World department, 

"Hollyivood." 

Soft Light Exhibit 5 Comedies and 3 Westerns 



to Be Held in Early 
April; Plan Tests 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 9.— One hundred di- 
rectors, cameramen and other studio workers 
gathered at the Roosevelt hotel last week to 
make plans for an exhibition of incandescent 
lighting which will be held at one of the stu- 
dios early in April. The exhibition is for the 
purpose of acquainting motion picture people 
with the new method of lighting and also to 
make tests and comparisons with bulbs and 
cameras which will show the advantages of 
soft lights. 

Among the attendants at the meeting were 
the following: 

Irvin Willat, A. Geo. Volck, Arthur Miller, William 
Sistrom, George Barnes, R. B. Mclntyre, W. O. 
Meller, Arthur Edeson, Lee Garmes, W. T. Strohm, 
Fred Pelton, J. T. Reed, Karl Struss, Chas. Rosher, 
M. C. Levee, Hal Mohr, Fred Jackman, Frank 
Murphy, Roy J. Pomeroy, Victor Milner, Roger 
Nauman, J. H. Davis, Henry Sharp, Louis Kolb, 
J. M. Nickolaus, William Perry, Gustavus Peterson, 
Dwight Warren, Geo. Mitchell, H. A. McDonell, J. 
A. Ball, Gilbert Warrenton, Joseph A. Dubray, Percy 
Hilburn, John Seitz, Geo. Meehan, Ned Van Buren, 
Nathan Levinson, Fred Beetson and Maitland Rice. 



Arrest Film School Head 
for Fraud; Charge $1,800 
Given Him for Lessons 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10.— Harry Kea- 
ton, operator of Chicago motion picture 
school, was arrested here last week on 
charges of fraudulently obtaining $1,800 
from Chicagoans desirous of learning screen 
acting. Keaton's first question, the com- 
plainants said, was an inquiry about how 
much money they could obtain. 



Sam E, Rork Becomes 
Supervisor at F,N, on 
Billie Dove Production 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10.— Sam E. Rork, 
producer of "A Texas Steer," yesterday signed 
a contract with the Burbank studio officials 
to supervise Billie Dove's next starring 
vehicle. 



Tyler Begins Second of 
New Series for Kennedy 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 9.— Tom Tyler began 
actual filming of his second production of the 
new series for F B O today. The title is "The 
Western Star." 



Among 42 Pictures in Work 

Mumau Begins on "Four Devils" for Fox Films; Tiffany-Stahl 
Signs Belle Bennett for Big Role in "Devil's Skipper;" 
Leni Film Near Completion 

By DOUGLAS HODGES 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10. — Of the 42 pictures in production in local studios 
this week five are comedies and three are Westerns. 

The comedies are "Speedy," a Harold Lloyd special; "Partners in Crime," 
a Raymond Hatton-Paramount vehicle ; "Chinatown Charley," starring Johnny 
Hines; "Be Yourself," starring Reginald Denny, and an untitled picture Eddie 
Cline is making with Louise Fazenda and Charles Murray. 

Tom Tyler heads the trio of Westerns believed by inhabitants of the film company 



with "The Western Star" for F B O, while 
the others are "Valley Beyond the Law" 
with Leo Maloney, and "Phantom of the 
Turf," a Duke Worne production, with 
Helene Costello and Rex Lease. 

Directors to start work during the next 
few days include Alfred E. Green, director 
of "Honor Bound," which stars Estelle 
Taylor. It will be a Fox release. 

DeMille Shoots Prevost Film 

Cecil B. DeMille began production yes- 
terday on "The Godless Girl" with Marie 
Prevost in the leading role after DeMille 
had tested two or three other young women 
for the part. 

F. W. Murnau got under way with "Four 
Devils" on the Fox lot. It stars Janet 
Gaynor and Barry Norton. 

Tiffany-Stahl Signs Belle Bennett 

Tiffany-Stahl began work on a picture 
this week and one last week. Al Raboch 
is director of the Dorothy Sebastian picture 
titled "Their Hour," which started Jan- 
uary 3. John Adolfi is director of "The 
Devil's Skipper" in which appears Belle 
Bennett. The Tiffany company is obtaining 
the biggest stars in Hollywood and is 



to be on the "up and up" so far as prestige 
goes. 

Wid Gunning hopes to complete "Burn- 
ing Daylight" within a few days. It has 
been in production since December 12 and 
is planned as one of First National's most 
important releases of the year. 

A number of other films that are due for 
the cutting room soon are "So This Is 
Love" (Columbia), "His Country" (Pathe), 
"Lady Be Good" (First National), and "The 
Man Who Laughs." The latter is a Uni- 
versal picture which has been in the 
shooting since October 1. 



Sit Stm Folks, You're 
Not Jumping Into Space 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 10.— A new 
"traveling telephoto lens" has been 
perfected whereby the camera ap- 
pears to follow directly behind mov- 
ing objects, although in reality the 
camera remains stationary, according 
to announcements from M-G-M. 

Whew! When those high divers 
toss themselves off 300-foot preci- 
pices into the water, and the camera 
keeps the closeup focus, what are 
some of our motion picture fans go- 
ing to do if they can't swim? 

The invention was made by Percy 
Hilburn, cameraman for "The Cos- 
sacks," being directed by George Hill. 



Frank Lloyd Signs to 
Direct Corinne's First 
Film for First National 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10.— Frank Lloyd has 
been signed by First National to direct a series 
of pictures first of which will be "The Divine 
Lady" which will star Corinne Griffith in her 
first film under her new contract. 

Miss Griffith has left United Artists to star 
in a series of eight pictures for First National. 
Her latest work is "The Garden of Eden," a 
half million dollar production completed last 
month. 



Woman Wants $29,000, 

Empey Named in Suit 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 10. — Arthur Guy 
Empey, World War veteran, writer and screen 
player, has been named in a suit for $29,000 
filed in superior court by Florence Evelyn 
Martin Rice, who asserts she loaned Empey 
sums totaling $36,000 on September 1, 1919, 
and April 30, 1920. According to the com- 
plaint Empey has repaid only $6,0(X) of the 
amount. 



Tim McCoy Given Saddle by Mayer 

HOLLYWOOD. — One of the most expensive and 
elaborate saddles ever made has just been presented 
to Tim McCoy by Louis B. Mayer. The saddle is 
embossed with silver and gold. 



22 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 




Bebe Daniels 

My Appreciation and All 
Qood Wishes 



PARAMOUNT 



1928 



January 14, 1928 



EXfflBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



23 



Marie Prevost in 
Lead of De Mille's 
''The Godless Girl" 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10.— Marie Prevost, 
star of many spicy comedies, has been assigned 
to a more dignified field of drama by Cecil B. 
DeMille, where she will star in "The Godless 
Girl" for Pathe. It is one of the biggest roles 
she has ever received and she will have the 
support of a very strong cast, among which is 
Lina Basquette. 

DeMille will personally direct the picture. 

Loyalty and Optimism 
Needed, Not 'Knockers'," 
Thalherg Advises Press 

(Special to Exhibitors He-aid and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 10.^"What the films 
need today, more than they ever did, is a 
spirit of loyalty," said Irving G. Thalberg, 
M-G-M executive, in a recent interview with 
Edwin Schallert of the Los Angeles Times. 

"Today we are facing an attitude of skepti- 
cism. This is very dangerous It has a 

tendency to discourage the producer from 
serious effort, and leads him to resort to that 
type of 'hokum' which he knows from experi- 
ence is sure-fire, which doesn't cost him as 
much, and which brings as a rule, good re- 
turns to the box office," concluded Thalberg. 

Gotham Units Return 

to Universal City Lot 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 10.— When the latest 
Gotham production "Bare Knees," scheduled 
to be released February 1, is completed at the 
Tec-Art Studios, where the organization has 
temporarily been located, the entire Gotham 
production units will return to Universal City. 

Equipment is now being moved, and the 
entire resources of Universal City will be 
available in the Gotham special, "United States 
Smith," which will go into production soon, 
for 1928 release. 

Catholic Guild Plans 

Hollywood Activities 

( special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 10.— The Catholic 
Motion Picture Guild of America, with head- 
quarters here, has announced the program for 
tile present year. 

The Guild was organized by the Rev. 
Michael J. Mullens, of the Church of Good 
Shepherd, Beverly Hills, to promote the reli- 
gious, social and material welfare of its mem- 
bers. It is affiliated with the Catholic Actors 
Guild of New York. 



No Kliegs for $2,20 Top 
at Hollywood '*Wings" 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 10.— There will be no 
Klieg lights or traffic jams at the Hollywood 
road show of "Wings" at the Biltmore the- 
atre January 15. 

"There will be none of the customary bally- 
hoo," says A. Griffith Grey, of the Paramount 
road show department, "and no invitations will 
be given to celebrities. The top price will be 
$2.20." 



THE STUDIO PREVIEW 



INSPIRATION'S latest picture before its merger with United 
Artists was "Ramona" which will be released through that 
distributing company. It is the story from the pen of Helen Hunt 
Jackson and stars Dolores Del Rio, whose performance in "What 
Price Glory" and "Resurrection" have already endeared her to 
American patrons. 

There is much to analyze in "Ramona" and much to love of the 
story. It is an example of the result of a group of expert techni- 
cians in the studio. True art is everywhere manifest, no less in 
the style of parchment titles than in the rythmic revelation of the 
plot. 

The titles are simple, yet well written and colorful. The be- 
ginning of the picture consists of 500 feet of illustrated para- 
graphs that acquaint us with the setting of the story. In that 
atmosphere appears Dolores Del Rio and Roland Drew, brother 
and sister, in the early days of California when Spanish dons 
graced the ranches where grazed thousands of cattle and sheep. 

The first half of the picture is a beautiful love story of Alessan- 
dro and Ramona. The last half is a tale of suspense in which the 
child of Ramona dies, the bandits burn the Indian village, massacre 
the men, women and children and steal the cattle. The death of 
Alessandro brings about the climax of the thrilling story and there 
follows Felipe's search and finding of Ramona and her return to 
the home of her childhood. 

It is a great story well adapted and directed for the screen. Its 
scenarist and title writer is Finis Fox, its director is Edwin Car- 
ewe, both of whom worked with Dolores Del Rio on "Resurrec- 
tion." 

If there is any criticism with the picture it is a minor sug- 
gestion as to its warmth. Most of its scenes are luxurious and 
spectacular. And yet Miss Del Rio's work when her child passes 
on is so human that the audience waits for more of just such emo- 
tion. But there is no desire of its producer to flood the picture 
with tears although the temptation was probably great. 

—HODGES. 

* * * 

"Her Wild Oat" is now into the first and second run houses and 
everybody concedes it is Colleen's best performance and is among 
the best pieces Micky Neilan ever directed. 

* * * 

First National held a private showing of "The Whip Woman" 
the other day with a second set of titles that will probably come 
out. If they come out and good ones are substituted I believe the 
picture will be improved 100 per cent. There is no doubt as to 
Estelle Taylor's work being excellent and there is an equal amount 
of assurance that the director, Joseph C. Boyle, has shot from his 
cuff most of the way through. His work lacks sincerity and ap- 
pears to be hastily done. 

—HODGES. 



24 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



D* W. QriiJith Entrains for U. A. 
Premiere in East 

Gossippers Call "Crimson Flower" ^eal Griffith Production Following Pre- 
views — Lupe Valez Loses Her Discoverer — May Murray Sued 
By RAY MURRAY 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 10.— D. W. Griffith leaves today for New York 
where he will attend the world premiere of his newest United Artists 
production, "The Crimson Flower." It opens at the Liberty theatre. 
This picture has had three titles up to the moment of going to press. First 
it was called "Drums of Love," then "The Dance of Life," and now is being 
shipped East as "The Crimson Flower." 

Lupe Valez's troubles are over for the 
present at least. A settlement out of court 
for $50,000 was reached last week in the 
suit of Frank A. Woodyard against the 
actress, who appeared opposite Douglas 
Fairbanks in "The Gaucho." The trial was 
set for Wednesday, January 4. The actress 
sought to have her contract with Woodyard 
rescinded on the ground that she was under 
18 years of age when she signed it. 
Woodyard obtained evidence, however, 
that she was born October 17, 1908. 
Woodyard, who discovered her in Mexico, 
entered into a contract with Miss Valez 
guaranteeing her $6,000 minimum a year, 
she to receive 75 per cent of her earnings 
over that amount. She is said to be 
receiving $2,500 a week at present. 



DW. plans to produce a new version of 
• "The Battle of the Sexes" which he 
filmed several years ago, with the much 
discussed companionate marriage twist to 
it. 

* * * 

Il^s Sam's Move Again 

Gotham Productions, Inc., has moved 
back to its former home at Universal stu- 
dios, according to an announcement made 
by Sam Sax, president. Gotham occupied 
quarters at Universal City for several years, 
then moved to the Fine Arts Studio on 
Sunset Boulevard. When TifTany-Stahl took 
over Fine Arts studios Sax rented space at 
the Tec-Art studios but has occupied the 
offices but a month. 



Mack Sennett studios on Glendale boule- 
vard reopened yesterday after a three 
weeks' mid-winter vacation. Three com- 
panies started shooting this week on next 
season's product. Building operations are 
progressing at Studio City, North Holly- 
wood, and Sennett expects to move into his 
new quarters some time in February. 



Culminating a romance which dates hack nine 
years, Raymond Griffith, comedian, and Bertha 
Mann, actress, were married Sunday. Superior 
Judge Hanby performed the ceremony. The 
couple left immediately after the wedding for 



a honeymoon trip. Griffith gave his age as 
32 years and Miss Mann is 31 years old. The 
couple first met while playing in a company at 
the Morosco theatre here. 



Another wedding which surprised Hollywood was Ike 
marriage of Iris Stuart, a Wampas star of 1927, to 
Bert A* McKinnon, magazine publisher of New York. 
They were married secretly at Las 'Vegas, Nov., Janu- 
ary 2. The couple are at the Ambassador hotel. Bliss 
Stuart was in films only six months when elacted a 
Wampas star. Ill health pravented her appearing 
under a Paramount contract and Ahe retired from 
pictures. 

^ ^ ^ 

Richard Wallace began filming the first 
scenes of the successful stage play "Lady 
Be Good" at First National studios last 
week. Jack Mulhall and Dorothy Mackaill 
are playing the leading roles, with Dot 
Farley, John Miljan and others in promi- 
nent roles. Jimmie O'Shea is Wallace's 
assistant. 

* * * 

Tay Garnett, who with Garrett, Fort 
adapted "White Gold" and wrote "Sky- 
scraper," William Boyd's present vehicle 
for Cecile B. DeMille, has signed a new 
contract with the Pathe-DeMille studios. 

Paul Leni will direct the final scenes of 
"The Man Who Laughs" at Universal 
studios this week. This will be one of 
Universal's big specials for this season, 
starring Mary Philbin and Conrad Veidt. 
It was adapted from Victor Hugo's classic 
and is said to have cost well over a million 
and a half dollars. 

* * * 

Mae Murray Sued 

Mae Murray, former M-G-M star, has 
been named defendant in a suit for $1,776 
by a Los Angeles costume company. The 
complaint alleges the film star contracted 
for theatrical apparel valued at $2,526 in 
the past four years and that she paid only 
$750 of this amount. 



Remember "McFaddeN'S FLATS?" 



Richard Wallace 

SCORES AQAIN 

with His Recent Directorial Effort 
Starring Will Rogers 



in 



^^A Texas Steer 



Produced by Sam Rork for First National 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



25 



A Gag or Two the 
Press Agent Missed 



Johnny Hines has a yen to visit dear ole 
Lunnon. He has checked up on the sales 
department and found that his film, "Home 
Made" has been booked in 200 more houses 
in London than in New York. (We could 
have easily put reverse English on this 
one.) 

* * * 

Still on foreign subjects, here's a para- 
graph Harry Carr wrote after talking to 
Director Paul Stein upon his return from 
his home in Vienna. 

"Nobody there has any money, but no- 
hody seems to care. Under a law passed 
after the Armistice, it is impossible for a 
landlord to eject a tenant for failing to pay 
rent; so nobody pays any rent. Landlords 
are the hardest up of anybody in Vienna." 
^ * * 

Following various but consistent reports 
from Universal executives that Reginald 
Denny is "out" at that lot at the expiration 
of his contract within a few weeks Mr. 
Denny announces that this picture, in pro- 
duction, will positively be his last unless 
the film company meets "his terms." 

Denny's terms are said to be better 
stories and better pictures. 

Columbia Gets Compson 
and Other Stars for 
Number of New Films 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10.— -Columbia has 
just signed a number of stars and feature 
players for roles in new pictures to be 
made by the company. Betty Compson has 
been signed to star in a picture to be 
made from Izola Forrester's short story, 
"Love of Liane." Roland Drew and Lilyan 
Tashman have been signed to support 
Estelle Taylor in "Lady Raffles," which is 
now in its third week of production. 

Shirley Mason and William Collier, Jr., 
will be co-featured in "So This Is Love," 
and Frank Cappa has been signed to direct. 
The picture is to be based on the story 
by Norman Springer. Gaston Glass and 
Armand Kaliz support Shirley Mason in 
"The Wife's Relations," a George B. 
Seitz production. It is a January release. 

Sidney in Big Role of 

**We Americans" at U 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 9.— The complete cast 
for "We Americans" has just been announced 
by Edward Sloman, Lfniversal director. It 
includes George Sidney, George Lewis, Albert 
Gran, Daisy Belmore, Michael Visaroff, Rosita 
Marstini, Eddie Phillips, Andy Devine and 
John Boles. The adaptation is by Al Cohn. 

Rapf in East on Early 

"Spring" Vacation Trip 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 9.— Harry Rapf, 
associate producer at M-G-M, left last week 
for New York where he will spend three 
weeks on the first vacation he has taken in 
two years. 





Harry has a good line and you'll recognize it in "The Chaser." His backfield, 
however, is something of the male order variety. Langdon finished the last scene 
on the last day of theJ old year and it goes to First National for distribution at 
once. 




Harry Langdon says "golf is a 
Scotch game because its a gift." He 
chases golf balls and whatnot in 
"The Chaser," a First National film, 
released next month. 




To what depths men may sink, 
chides Gladys McConnell, Harry 
Langdon's leading woman in "The 
Chaser." Helen Hayward, left, has 
a good role in the film. 




"Five future Wampas stars" and Harry Langdon in a scene from "The Chaser" 
which First National will release. 



26 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World 

Production Directory 

[Number immediately following title denotes production number] 



STORY 



DIREOTOB 



CHIEF BRAND 
PLATERS NAME 



STARTING 
DATE 



Associated Studios 



NO PRODUCTION 



California Studio 



Untitled 



Percy Pembroke Gaston Glass 



Trem Carr Prod. 



Jan. 5 



Chadwick Studio 



"Phantom of the Duke Worne 
Turf" 



Helene Coetello 
Rex Lease 



Duke Worne Prod. 



Jan. 4 



Columbia Studio 



"So This Is 
Levo" (15) 

"Lady 
Raffles" (16) 



Frank Capra 



R. Wm. Neill 



Shirley Mason 
Buster Oollier 
Johnny Walker 
Bstello Taylor 
Roland Drew 
Lilyan Tashman 



Perfect 80 



Perfect 30 



Dec. 2 
Dec. 24 



DeMille Studio 



"His Country" 

(3-25) 
"Skyscraper" 

(3-24) 
"Hold 'Em 

Yale" (11) 
"The Godless 

Girl" (30) 



Wra. K. Howard Rudolph 

Schildkraut 

Howard Higgin 



E. H. Griffith 
C. B. DeMille 



William Boyd 
Rod LaRocqae 

Marie Prevoet 



Dec. 6 
Nov. 28 
Dec. 27 
Jan. 3 



F B 0 Studio 



"The Western Louis King 
Star" (2) 



Tom Tyler 



Western 



Jan. 3 



First National Studio 



"Lilac Time" 



Colleen Moore 



Richard Barthel- 
meas 



Milton Sills 



(jeorge Fitz- 
maurice 

"Little Shepherd" Al Santell 
of Kingdom 
Come" 

"Burning (Jhas. Brabin 

Daylight" 

"Lady Be Good" Richard -Wallace Dorothy Mackaill 

. ^ Jack Mulball 
"The HeadUn»*'"ftIan Dwan CSiester' Conklin Robt. Kane Prod. 

Alice White 
"Heart of a J. F. Dillon Billie Dove 

FoUis Girl" Larry Kent 

Untitled Eddie Cline Chas. Murray 

Louise Fazenda 



Dee. 19 
Deo. 14 

Dec. 18 
Dec. 6 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 27 
Dec. 27 



Fox Studio 


"The Four 


F. W. Miirnau Janet Gaynor 


Jan. 


3 


Devils" (2) 


Chas. Norton 






Nancy Drexel 
Barry Norton 






"Honor Bound" 


Alfred E. Green Geo. O'Brien 


Jan. 


6 


(6) 


Leila Hyaras 
Estelle Taylor 






"Square Crooks" 


Lou Seller Robt. Armstrong 


Dec. 


27 


(28) 


' Dorothy Dwan 






"The Escape" 


Richard Rosson Wm. Russell 


Dec. 


22 


(2) 


Virginia Valli 






1 Nancy Drexel 






"Dressed to BaU" Irving OummingsEdmund Lowe 


Dec. 


22 




(••t Mary Astor 






"Red Dancer of 


Raoul Walsh Doloree Del Rio 


Dec. 


21 


Moscow" (21) 
"Love Hungrry" 


Charles Farrell 






Victor Heerman Lois Moran 


Dec. 


13 


(2) 


Lawrence Gray 







STORY 



DIREITTOR 



CHIEF BRAND 
PLAYERS NAME 



STARTING 
DATE 



Metropolitan Studio 



"The Yellow 

Cameo" 
"Speedy" 
"Hell's Angels" 



"Valley Bey«nd 
the Law" 



Spencer Bennett Allene Ray 



Ted Wilde 
Luther Reed 



Leo Maloney 



Harold Lloyd 
Ben Lyon 
Greta Nlssen 
James Hall 
Leo Maloney 



Patheserial 

Paramount 
Caddo Production 



Dec. 8 

July 30 
Nov. 7 



Leo Maloney Prod. Dec. 12 



Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studio 



"China Bound" Wm. Nigh Ramon Nevarro 

(354) 

"The Actress" Sidney Franklin Norma Shearer 
(336) 

"Laugh, Clown Herbert Brenon Lon Chaney 
Laugh" (352) 



Dec. 27 
Dec. 24 
Dec. 29 



Paramount-Famous-Lasky Corporation 



CJlareee Badger CHara Bow Paramount 
Frank gtrayer Ray Hatton Paramount 
Ernet Lubitsch Emil Jannings Paramount 



"Red Hair" 

(686) 
"Partners In 

Grime" (689) 
"The Patriot" 

(690) 

Untitled (692) Lothar Mendez Adolph Menjou Paramount 



Dec. 12 
Dec. 19 
Jan. 3 
Jan. 5 



Tec- Art Studio 



"Chinatown 
Charley" 



Chas. Hines 



Johnny Hines 



Dee. 27 



Tiffany-Stahl Studio 



"Their Hour" 



"The Devil's* 
Skipper" 

Victor 



Al Raboch Johnny Harron Tiffany-Stahl Jan. 8 

Dorothy Sebastian 
June Marlowe 
Huntley Gordon 
Holmes Herbert 

John Adolfi Belle Bennett Tiffany-Stahl Jan. 6 

Malcolm Mc- 
Gregor 



United Artists Studio 



"Tempest" 



Sam Taylor 



John Barrymore John Barrymore 
Production 



Oct. 15 



Universal Studio 



"We Americans" Edw. Sloman 

(4681). I 
"Fallen Angels" Ed. Laemmle 

(4337) 

"The /Man Who Paul Leni 

Laughs" (4535) 
"Be Yourself" Wm. Seiter 

(4722) 



All Star 

Pauline Stark 
Norman Kerry 
Mary Philbin 
Conrad Veidt 
Reginald Denny 



Jewel 
Jewel 
Jewel 
Jewel 



Dec. 19 
Dec. 7 
Oct. 1 
Jan. 3 



Warner Brothers 



NO PRODUCTION THIS WEEK. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



27 



THE SHORT FEATURE 



Incorporated in this department of Exhibitors Herald is the Moving Picture World department, 
"Little Pictures with the Big Punch," which has presented news, reviews and exploitation on 

short features and serials. 



Business Manager 



6i 



9'9 




HERBERT S. HANCOCK 

BUSINESS manager of Kinograms as 
well as associate editor of the news- 
reel distributed by Educational, is now the 
title of Herbert S. Hancock, by virtue of 
his appointment by Captain George McL. 
Baynes, president of Kinograms Publishing 
Corporation. 



European Exhibitors 
Still Slow to Realize 
Short Feature 's Value 

European theatres, with the exception of 
the better class German houses, have yet to 
learn the value of the short feature on the 
program, according to the motion picture sec- 
tion of the Department of Commerce at Wash- 
ington. 

Factors cited by the department are the 
prevalence of double feature shows and the 
distributors' consequently feeble attempts to 
popularize the short product, which brings no 
profit under the circumstances. Many of the 
short features are added gratis by the distrib- 
utors to the program. Another reason is the 
low comedy type of short feature made over- 
seas. 

About 90 per cent of all the short films 
shown in Europe are of American origin, ac- 
cording to the bulletin. 



What I Did for Short Feature 

Is New Service for Exhibitors 

How Have You Put Over Your Short Product? Your Fellow Theatre 
Owner Wants to Know — Write This Department 

A new service — "What I Did for the Short Feature" — is the latest departure 
to be made by this department in the interest of the exhibitor. 

Two Parts to Exhibition 

There are two definite parts to short feature exhibition — definite in both 
application and result, and the one is essential to the other. In the motion 
picture business as in all other businesses — except digging post holes — one gets 
out of it just what one puts into it, or, in other words, the receipts increase in 
direct proportion to the increase of energy and ef¥ort expended toward making 
the show a success. 



In the next issue of Exhibitors Herald 
AND Moving Picture World, reports on 
short features from the "What the Picture 
Did for Me" department will be repeated 
in "The Short Feature" department. "What 
the Picture Did for Me" has proved indis- 
pensable to hundreds of exhibitors, as their 
letters have testified. Transferring reports 
on short product to this department under 
a heading such as "What the Short Feature 
Did for Me" will tie such reports logically 
into the department. 

Must Know What Others Do 

What is most important however is 
this. The exhibitor, in booking his short 
feature, wants to know how he can best sell 
the picture to the public. To do that he 
must have details frorn his fellow exhibitors 
explaining how they concentrated their ef- 
forts to put over the production. 

Parallel to "What the Short Feature Did 
for Me" will be a column of "What I Did 
for the Short Feature." The one column 
will tell an exhibitor what the picture has 
done for other theatre owners at the cash- 
ier's window. The other column will tell 
the same exhibitor what his colleagues did 
to help bring in the maximum attendance 
for the showing of that picture. Thus a 
complete service will be given, combining 
the majority decision on the pulling value 
of a picture with a black-and-white descrip- 
tion of how the picture was put over. And 
each exhibitor will render a two-fold service 
to the others. 

"FUler" Idea Is Passe 

There is no assistance to be obtained in 
this service from the exhibitor who still con- 
siders the short feature a filler. Happily, 
there are few of this species still extant. 
However, there is an opportunity to help 
him to see the light, for while there can 
be no help from him, there can be much 
help for him. And usually the exhibitor 
who applies exploitation ideas of another 
is the successful exhibitor. 

Complete cooperation from all you exhibi- 
tors is essential to make such a service of the 
value it should have. All classes of short fea- 
ture product are eligible for treatment in this 
service — the comedy, the scenic, the newsreel. 



the cartoon, the serial, and any other type. 
Enlightening Fellow-Erfiibitors 

From the survey in the field being made by 
J. C. Jenkins, field representative of Exhibi- 
tors Herald and Moving Picture World, all 
readers of this department know what the 
majority of exhibitors in the states visited 
have considered the value of the short feature 
to the program as far as boosting it in news- 
paper advertisements is concerned. To the 
exhibitor who has felt that the short feature 
in itself has not merited a considerable share 
of the newspaper space, there is the oppor- 
tunity presented to his fellow-showman to 
prove the fact that the short feature is a 
vital factor in box office returns provided 
showmanship is applied. 

The field is open and there is no handicap 
system. Address your letters to The Short 
Feature, Exhibitors Herald and Moving 
Picture World, 407 So. Dearborn street, Oii- 
cago. 



Newspictures 



KINOGRAMS NO. 5359 — ^Devildogs off from New York 
to Nicaragua—— Navy *0 inquiry into S-4 disaater be- 
gins—Japan opens school to revive teaching of 
ancient art of self-defense. 

M-G-M NEWS NO. 41 — White Honse welcomes thoa- 
sands in record New Year reception^-U. S. sends 
help to Marines in Nicaragua — College ski jumpers 
out for new records at Lake Placid Club, N. Y. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS NO. 46— American airmen seek 
endurance record held by Germany (at Daytona 
Beach, Fla.)— Crowds tarn out for derby day In 
Shanghai* China— Begin tests of sun, at Potsdam, 
Germany. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS NO. 47 — ^To fix blame for S-4 
disaster, at Boston, Mass.— Big pines must go, at 
Stupart, Ontario^— West shows *em how to play foot- 
ball at Pasadena, Cal. 

INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL NO. 2 — Middies show 
vim and dash In Indoor athletle sports at Annapolis, 
Md.— Hikers fight fierce gale in climb up Pikes Peak, 
Col.^Gorgeous floats parade In annual Rose Festi- 
val, at Pasadena. 

FOX NEWS NO. 29 — ^New Year's callers throng White 
House— College boys stage lively **glrl** show at 
University of Wisconsin — Mummers turn out In 
freezing weather at Philadelphia, for annual parade. 

FOX NEWS NO. 30 — ^Navy begins Inquiry into S-4 dis- 
asters—Winter horse racing is on at New Orleans 
track— Army aviation corps buys huge bombers, at 
Bristol, Pa. 



28 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



LIVE NEWS FROM COAST TO COAST 



Portland 

PORTLAND.— i?a3< A. Grombacher, of 
Spokane, presented the remodeled Liberty in 
a gala premiere of Al Jolson in "The Jazz 
Singer," recently. . . . Washington Theatre 
Enterprises has signed a contract with Tiffany 
Productions, for all third dimension pictures, 
which will be shown at their new Mayflower 
theatre in Seattle, scheduled to be opened 
€arly in February. . . . The "Seattle," Seat- 
tle's new 4,000 sreat theatre, located at Ninth 
Avenue and Pine street, in the new nine story 
theatre building, will be opened early in 
February. It is understood to represent a 
total investment of $3,000,000. 



Ottawa 

OTTAWA. — James R. Muir, manager of 
the Capitol, has been promoted to district 
manager of Famous Players Canadian Corp. 
. . . Walter P. Wilson, manager of the Capi- 
tol, at Edmonton, Alberta, has been appointed 
manager of the Vancouver, Capitol. . . . Mon- 
treal's municipal censor, Martin Singer, in- 
spected almost 100,000 theatrical posters dur- 
ing 1927, and of this number 2,500 were con- 
demned as unfit for public gaze. . . . The 
civic administration of Montreal received 
revenue amounting to $814,000 from the civic 
amusement tax in 1927, this total being an 
increase of $33,700 over the previous year. 
... In Toronto last year, six suburban thea- 
tres were erected at a combined cost of $271,- 
000, exclusive of land purchases. Extensive 
alterations were made in ten other theatres 
in Toronto at a cost of $21,325, and one 
large house was closed. . . . Harold Bishop, 
assistant manager of the Calgary Capitol, is 
now manager of the Capitol at Edmonton. 
. . . Sam Binder, assistant manager of the 
Empress at Edmonton, has been transferred to 
the Capitol at Calgary. 



Des Moines 



Pittsburgh 



Dayton 



DAYTON.— Loew's Dayton Theatre Com- 
pany has been chartered by papers filed with 
the secretary of state at Columbus, with a 

capital of 1,000 shares The Duchess 

Theatre Inc., with offices at 5718 Euclid ave- 
nue, Cleveland, has been incorporated with a 
capital of $10,000 to acquire either by lease 
or purchase, and to operate or construct thea- 
tres. The incorporators are Joseph Zell, Hy- 
tnan Mott and Jllelle S telle. 



Atlanta 



ATLANTA.— F. /. Turner, of Charlotte, 
N. C, generalmanager of the recently com- 
pleted reorganization of the Carolina Thea- 
tres, Inc., made the announcement Wednes- 
day of a proposed increase of the company's 
capital from $300,000 to $500,000 at an early 
date. . . . Ground is being cleared at Lincoln- 
ton for the construction of a new $100,000 
theatre, the next project in the oreranization 
program of expansion. . . . Following a cor- 
dial house warming presided over by Man- 
ager C. B. Ellis on last Saturday night, 
F B O's Jacksonville, Fla., exchange opened 
new offices at 1262 West Adams street, in a 
building especially constructed for them. 



DES MOINES. — A temporary injunction 
was issued in district court at Red Oak, 
against the oity of Villisca, prohibiting inter- 
ference by city officials with the operation of 
the motion picture theatre in that place on 
Sunday. The suit was filed by Dr. F. J. Liken, 
owner of the theatre. . . . The Villisca fight 
dates from November, when Brooks Till- 
worth, operator, was fined for violation of an 
ordinance which prevents Sunday shows. . . . 
After Tillworth became tired of the weekly 
fine, he was succeeded by Dan Bogue, who 
was fined five times as much, or $25 for op- 
erating the house on Sunday. Dr. Liken then 
retaliated by serving notice on business houses 
open for sales on Sunday that he would prose- 
cute under the state blue laws. . . . Seven 
merchants were hailed into court. A res- 
taurant keeper was chareed with selling a 
cigar to Dr. Liken. The jury in this case, 
brought in this remarkable verdict, "Defend- 
ant not guilty — smoking is essential." 



Kansas City 

KANSAS CITY. — For three years George 
Armstrong, messenger for the Shubert, had 
been making daily trips to a nearby bank to 
get change for the box office. While return- 
ing with $300 change for the theatre, two 
bandits held him up and robbed him of the 
money. . . . Kansas City's new $1,500,000 Up- 
town theatre, operated by Universal Chain 
Theatrical Enterprises Corp., opened last Fri- 
day. 




'Evangelism Through the Eye," with the 
use of both issues of International News- 
reel, is the topic of special services by 
Rev. Dr. Jason Noble Pierce, pastor of 
the First Congregational Church at 
Washington, which President Coolidge 
attends. He is shown receiving the Brst 
issue under his contract from Nate Sau- 
ber. Universal exchange manager. 



PITTSBURGH.— The Gayety theatre, bur- 
lesque house, has announced that it will close 
for the season, on January 14th. . . . Hyman 
Wheeler, booker, was held up by two armed 
negroes while walking in the Hill district, and 
had taken from him $2.00 as well as a Christ- 
mas gift from his best girl, a scarf. . . . The 
following day he fell and sprained his ankle. 
. . . The right hand and forearm of Joseph 
Richman, of the Keystone theatre, was badly 
scalded by escaping steam from the heating 
plant. . . . Joe won't be able to use his arm 
for a number of days. 



Columbus 



COLUMBUS.— The third r9und in the bout 
waged by motion picture exhibitors to secure 
legal authority to exhibit the Tunney-Demp- 
sey fight films in Ohio, was waged in the 
Ohio Supreme Court, January 5, with no de- 
cision as usual. ... In fact, the court was 
considerably muddled in the controversy, and 
it indicated that members might want to view 
the films in order to gain knowledge of the 
dispute. . . . The case came up on mandamus 
proceedings brought by Frank Mantell of 
Dayton, and the Midwestern Film Exchange 
of Akron, the latter represented by attorney 
Stitart R. Bolin. The mandamus seeks to 
compel John F. Clifton, Ohio film censor, to 
admit the films to censorship, which he has 
steadily refused to do. 



Albany 



ALBANY. — First run theatres in this city 
are planning to seek protection from sub- 
sequent run houses, and will carry their com- 
plaint to the Albany Film Board of Trade. 
. . . Jack Krause, manager for Tiffany, nar- 
rowly escaped death in an automobile acd- 
dent last week. Krause's car skidded, jumped 
onto the tracks of an electric line, and over- 
turned. . . . John Faust, doorman at the 
Mark Ritz theatre, will spend the next two 
years at the Albany County Jail. But it is 
not as bad as it sounds, for he was appointed 
last week as jailer by the new sheriff. 

San Antonio 

SAN ANTONIO.— PMWt.r is making a big 
scoop in the publicity game by their recent 
signing of the Berkova Production Company 
to make a local motion picture in each of the 
Publix de luxe houses in the Central and 
South United States. . . . Sunday shows in 
Temple are being patronized by the majority 
of "Temple inhabitants and business people 
who have made it clear that they are not in 
accord with paid advertisements which have 
been run in the local paper, denouncing the 
movement as a desecration of Sunday and a 
flaunting of the laws of God and the State. 



Milwaukee 



MILWAUKEE.— £rfc?je Kueppers has been 
signed as assistant advertising and publicity 
manager to M. P. Kelly, at Saxe's Wisconsin 
theatre. . . . The latest result of the bowling 
tournament among the film exchanges and 
exhibitors shows the Scenics to be in first 
place, the Features and Serials tied for second, 
the Comedies and Newsreels tied for fourth 
and the Cartoons in fifth place. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



29 



BETTER PROJECTION 

Projection Is Essential, and "Better Projection Pays" 



By F. H. RICHARDSON 

Bluebook School Answers Nos. 603 and 604 



QUESTION No. 605— This question was 
proposed by Brother E. B. Marshall, Van- 
couver, B. C. It is: "What is the voltage 
across the terminal of each rheostat in the 
series connection herewith illustrated, as- 
suming them all to be 110 volt instruments, 
and the amperage capacity of each, when 
working alone, to be as indicated? 

There was a varied assortment of replies, 
numbering, in all, 136. Those entitled to 
credit are as follows: 

Chas. E. Curie, Chattanooga, Tenn., C. H. Han- 
over, Burlington, la., Frank Dudiak, Fairmont, W. 
Va., John Griffiths, Ansonia, Conn., T. R. Guimond, 
Mobile, Ala., G. L. Doe, John Doe and "Bill" Doe, 
Chicago, 111., Thomas McNamara, Waltham, Mass., 
W. R. Gwynn, Estes Park, Col., Thos. Lithrom, 
Trinidad, Col., T. D. Alexander, Decatur, 111., T. R. 
Roand and F. T. Bolter, both of St. Louis, Mo., 
John Christensen, Galveston, Tex., H. L. Baker, 
Johnstown, Pa., W. C. Burke, Topeka, Kan., W. J. 
Lathrop and Frank T. Spencer, Little Rock, Ark., 
A. D. Henley, Seattle, Wash., Thomas Billings, 
London, England, A. Hancock, Dallas, Texas, F. T. 
Johnson, Moline, II!., G. Atkindon, Cleveland, O., 
Allan Gengenbeck, New Orleans, La., N. R. Quigley, 
Oklahoma City, Okla., W. Turner, Pontiac, Mich., 
and D. G. Henderson, Quincy, 111. 

On the whole I think I will publish the 
answer of Brother Gwynn, because he ar- 
rives at the result by what I believe to be 
the best way. He says: 

"Assume that a voltmeter actually reads 
50 volts across the arc, as stated in the 
problem. Applying Kirchoff's Law, which 
states that the voltage drop across a resist- 
ance is always equal to the voltage which 
causes the current to flow through the 
resistance, the voltage drop across the arc 
is 50 volts. Subtracting this from the total 
applied pressure (110 volts), the voltage 



Bluebook School Questions 
Nos. 622 and 623 

QUESTION NO. 622— If it be found 
necessary to replace one member of an 
intermittent movement, would you or 
would you not replace both members — 
star and cam? 

QUESTION NO. 623— While the re- 
placement of intermittent movement parts 
should always be done either at the fac- 
tory or at one of its service stations, still 
emergencies will arise and the projec- 
tionist should know how to replace a star 
or an intermittent sprocket. Describe the 
correct method, step by step, of removing 
an intermittent sprocket from the shaft 
and replacing it with a new one. 



drop across the three rheostats is 60 volts. 

"The relative conductances of the three 
rheostats is stated. Conductance is the 
inverse of resistance. The voltage drop is 
in direct proportion to the resistance. 
Therefore, the voltage drop will be in in- 
verse proportion to the conductance. 

"The conductance is given in the ratio 
of 20 to 30 to 60 or 2 to 3 to 6. 

"Since the voltage drop is in inverse pro- 
portion it will be in the rate of to 1/3 
to 1/6 of the total drop of 60 volts. 

"Drop across 20 A. rheostat is ^ of 60 
volts, or 30 volts. 

"Drop across 30 A. rheostat is 1/3 of 
60 volts, or 20 volts. 



"Drop across 60 A. rheostat is 1/6 of 60 
volts, or 10 volts. 

"Kindly note that calculation of the ohmic 
resistance of each unit is omitted, as well 
as any attempt to calculate the resistance 
of the arc. I have tried to work the prob- 
lem on the rule that conductance is the 
inverse of resistance." 

However, I also will set before you the 
reply of Brother Curie, which is essentially 
the same as that of the others whose names 
have been given. He says: 

"Since the line voltage is 110 volts and 
the arc voltage is 50,110 — 50 or 60 volts 
must be consumed by the rheostats. The 
resistance of the 20 ampere rheostat would 
be 60 20 = 3 ohms. The resistance of the 
30 ampere rheostat would be 60 ^ 30 = 2 
ohms, and the resistance of the 60 ampere 
rheostat is 60 60 = 1 ohm, 3 plus 2 plus 1 
equals 6, the ohmic resistance of the three 
rheostats connected in series. If 60 volts 
is to be consumed by the rheostats, the 
voltage across their terminals must be 
proportional to their resistance, then the 
voltage across the terminals of the 20 am- 
pere rheostat would be 3/6 of 60, or 30 
volts; the terminal voltage of the 30 ampere 
rheostat 2/6 of 60, or 20 volts; and the 
terminal voltage, or the voltage across the 
terminals of the 60 ampere rheostat, would 
be 1/6 of 60, or 10 volts." 

QUESTION No. 606— Is there any dif- 
ference between a series multiple and a 
multiple series connection? 

The cuts of Brothers Dudiak and Curie 
serve to answer this question very well 
indeed. 



Exhibitor Wants Blue Prints 

Wildfred D. Jackson, Bala, Muskoka, Ontario, says be is 
an ex-soldier who helped in the late argument with Germany. 
He says he is a licensed motion picture projectionist, and 
has derived great help from the Bluebook of Projection. 
In fact, he says that being 120 miles from the nearest place 
where repairs for projectors might be made it has been 
invaluable to him. He then continues: "What I am now 
trying to do is build a small theatre of my own. It is to be 
hollow tile construction, about 250 seating capacity and have 
my own residence above it. I am wondering if some one 
who has built a small theatre somewhat along the same lines 
would not lend a helping hand by loaning me his blueprints 
or plans. You must see what I think of you, friend Rich- 
ardson, when I believe you can pull off a stunt like that 
for me." 

I don't think I can. Friend Jackson, for the very simple 
reason that few small theatres such as you propose to erect 
have scale plans drawn, or so I believe. You propose what 
is distinctly a village theatre, and usually when such a thea- 
tre is contemplated the one who proposes to build it just 
makes a few rough drawings, calls in the local carpenter, 
and without further ado the theatre is built. 

However, if anyone does have such plans, won't they 
please lend the helping hand, as asked, and loan them to 
Friend Jackson. Just send them to him as per above ad- 
dress. "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World" is 
always ready to do what it can to try to render assistance, 
but frankly in this case I've my doubts. Hope I am agree- 
ably surprised. 




fSt Volt I»C«nd» 



-=O-pHy>KM><>-0--ffc C>- 
^l»»'Vo)A ^rt Lamps J— IJ* 



Par«lU1 — S ertes C\vcurt . 
FIQ.NB-l. 

















H»- 


^ 500 L 

"VVOITS 






-»- _ 


_ ♦ 






-X- 
-»- 






* 


e 




-«■ 
D 


-*■ 
E 



Series-Parallel Circuit 




h k \ h k 



Mu-ltiple-seriea connections. 
Tlfe ginall circles represents 
Incandescent lamps all of the 
same wattuge. 



UdLTS 



Soriea- multiple conneotlonoj 



30 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



PRESENTATION ACTS 




Incorporated in this department of Exhibitors Herald is the Moving Picture World Department, 

"Stage and Pit." 

Fanchon & Marco Expanding Units 

Latest Music 
Guide Issued 
Gets Approval 

Borodkin's Music Guide Has 150 
Classifications, and 6,000 Pub- 
lished Compositions — ^Musical 
Directors and Experts 
Recommend and En- 
dorse the New System 

A complete and authentic guide to 
motion picture music is now available 
to every musical director and organist 
in the motion picture theatre. This 
new guide which was written and com- 
piled by Maurice Borodkin, one of 
America's best authority on the sub- 
ject, is an indexed book practical in 
every way and entirely devoted to the 
selection and musical scores for the 
accompaniment of motion pictures in 
the theatres. 

This guide has taken the author nearly 
ten years to compile, in which he utilizes 
over 6,000 numbers from the catalogues of 
nearly every leading publisher of this coun- 
try and Europe. These numbers are in- 
dexed under 150 different olassifications 
which give different effects, depending upon 
the scene or atmosphere of the descrip- 
tion. One of the important features of this 
catalogue is a notation on each number 
which describes the character of each 
classification which aids in the scoring of 
the production. 

New Guide Is Complete 

Mr. Borodkin has been associated with 
motion picture theatre music for the past 
fifteen years, of which eight of them he has 
spent as librarian of the Rialto, Rivoli, and 
Capitol theatres of New York, in which at 
that time he was associated with Erno 
Rapee. For the past five years, Mr. Borod- 
kin has been chief librarian for Balaban 
and Katz and the Chicago Publix theatres. 
The system which these houses now have 
in the way of a complete and up-to-date 
music library can be credited to this man's 
creation and expert knowledge of the field. 

This book which is issued and published 
by the author, under his own name, is now 
on the market and available to every 
picture theatre and attache of music. A 
number of the leading theatres in this coun- 
try are now already using the system and 
find it very effective. 

(Continued on page 31) 



ROY DEITRICH, that g'olden voiced singer, who 
for the past few years in presentation and musical 
shows has created a large following for his ballads, 
made his debnt this week as a stagehand leader at 
the Avalon theatre, Chicago's newest and most beau- 
tiful deluxe picture house. A royal reception was 
given to Roy on his opening night, one that will go 
down in theatrical history for a new comer in the 
bandshow field. 



Parisian Red Heads 
Girl Band to Record 

What is probably the greatest record ever 
attained by a traveling band is that which is 
held by the "Parisian Redheads," an all-girl 
aggregatiori of musicians with each and every 
one of them being a red-head. The band 
which is led by Bobby Grice, it's female Master 
of Ceremonies and Claudia Peck, the musical 
director, is the culimation of an idea which 
Charles E. Green and Ace Berry, a well known 
showman, had for a long time. Mr. Green, 
who is both producer and manager of this 
attraction, reports that they have broken box- 
office records wherever the band played and is 
the only girl band accredited to playing two 
or more weeks in one theatre. Recently the 
band was contracted to record for the Bruns- 
wick records which is another honor that is 
a privilege to hold as up to date there is no 
other girl-band in the country that has ever 
recorded for any major company. One of the 
novel features about this attraction is the fact 
that in each town they appear, the theatre 
through a newspaper tie-up carries on a con- 
test during the period of their engagement in 
which every contestant of a redhead nature is 
admitted free at the theatre by presenting a 
coupon presented by the paper sponsoring the 
contest. 



New Company 
Formed with 
West Coast 

Fanchon & Marco Will Stage Pro- 
logues and Presentations for 
All West Coast Theatres — 
Stanley Chain May 
Be Included Later 
By A. RAYMOND GALLO 

With the formation of the new 
Fanchon and Marco production com- 
pany in Los Angeles, the West Coast 
will probably become one of the cen- 
ters of stage presentation for motion 
picture houses. The new enterprise 
which was formed last week is a sub- 
sidiary of West Coast Theatres, Inc., 
with an equal amount of shares held by 
each one. Inasmuch as Los Angeles 
is really the center of all motion pic- 
ture production which also has a num- 
ber of long run deluxe picture houses 
it is logical to assume that the produc- 
tion of stage prologues should be car- 
ried on there. 

According to plans now formulating the 
operation of these new productions will be 
extended immediately into every theatre on 
the West Coast chain as well as other cir- 
cuits affiliated with this organization. All 
shows including the present Fanchon and 
Marco unit will have their premier at the 
Metropolitan theatre, Los Angeles, where 
Rube Wolf is still creating a huge success 
as a master of ceremonies. After opening 
at the above theatre the productions will be 
augmented or elaborated in some way so that 
they may fit into the program of the key 
houses operated by the West Coast circuit, 
before going on tour. 

F. & M. May Book Stanley Chain 

If the present plans mature Fanchon and 
Marco presentations will be shown in all 
Stanley houses in the East as well as other 
affiliated circuits. A move to effect this new 
arrangement is now on and in the course of 
another week or two the exact plans of this 
new organization will be made known. 

Since stage presentation has become a large 
factor in picture houses, Fanchon and Marco 
have been the chief factors on the West 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



31 



Coast in which they have affiUated their efforts 
exclusively with the West Coast Theatres, 
Inc. Now that the motion picture producers 
have realized the value of stage presentations 
to accompany photoplays a serious move is 
on to stage prologues for these new motion 
pictures which will come up to the standard 
of the film productions but in no way rob 
the films of any box-office or entertainment 
value. 

If this purported arrangement is effected 
it will mean that Fanchon and Marco will 
employ hundredsi of artists for the period of 
one or two years' engagament to tour their 
theatres exclusively. In addition to this, they 
will require hundreds of girls for their ballets, 
and many name bands wherever a stage band 
policy may be installed. This change and 
expansion of presentations means work for 
every class of entertainers from opera singers 
to dispensers of blues. 

Deal Means More Bookings 

As stated before in these columns with the 
recent merger of Public and Loew stage 
units now touring over each other's theatres, 
and this new move of Fanchon and Marco, 
it will now be possible for presentation artists 
to work consecutively in picture houses from 
a period of 40 to 170 weeks without any open 
time. Of course this may mean that they 
may be expected to negotiate bookings through 
various offices, and work through affiliated 
circuits, but it is taken for granted that if a 
specialty act of any caliber makes good in 
one theatre or on one circuit, that they will 
be recommended for the other. 



New Music Guide 

(Continued from page 30) 

Experts Endorse System 

Among the most prominent men in 
charge of the musical destinies of the de 
luxe picture theatres of America who 
highly endorse and recommend the use of 
this system are as follows: Nathaniel Fins- 
ton, general musical director, Publix thea- 
tres ; Louis R. Lipstone, general musical 
director of Balaban and Katz; H. Leopold 
Spitalny, musical director of Chicago thea- 
tre; Joseph Engelhardt, musical director, 
McVicker's theatre, and Adolph Dumont, 
prominent New York musical director. 

In the next issue of "Better Theatres" a 
more complete and illustrated story of the 
cause and effects of this new system will be 
published. 



Al Short Returns 

Al Short, well known musical director now con- 
ducting band shows for Publix in Houston, Texas, 
returns to the Capitol theatre, Chicago, on Janu- 
ary 23. 



DAVID 


GOULD 


LUBLINER & 


TRINZ 


BALABAN & KATZ 




Production Dept. 




Chicago 



Monthly SLIDE ne^K^s l^ljytJij' 
(or and, about thcOIlGANIST 



54 W- RANDOLPH £>T, CHlUOO 



Presentation 

LETTERS 

In this open forum those interested in 
presentation may discuss important matters 
bearing upon this phase of theatre entertain- 
ment. Only signed letters will be poblished. 



PRESENTATION ACTS— To the Editor: Noting 
that you are responsible for the song reviews in 
Exhibitors Herald I am going to ask you for a little 
information. 

This theatre is just starting using the stage band 
idea with the band on stage and we are anxious 
of securing the latest hits and would therefore appre- 
ciate any information you could give me relative to 
the various music publishers and their addresses. 

Thanking you for compliance with this request, I 
am — ^A. B. McCollom, Lorraine theatre, Hoopeston, 
111. 

PRESENTATION ACTS— To the Editor: Just a 
line to let you know how I'm getting along. I am 
very happy in my new position, the theatre is beauti- 
ful, the organ likewise and a prince of a manager in 
the person of Sidney Dannerberg from New York. 

The town has some very pretty spots and I think 
I'll like it very much. 

Ralph Pollack from the Saenger in New Orleans 
is the band leader here, and he is one regular 
fellow. 

Birmingham audiences have been marvelous to me 
so far, here's hoping it keeps up, I sure am work- 
ing hard enough. Am busy night and day, the 
organ needs a good deal of attention and I have to 
spend quite a bit of time vrith that for a while. 
Drope me a line. — Joe Alexander, Organist, New 
Alabama theatre, Birmingham, Ala. 

PRESENTATION ACTS— To the Editor: I am 
now playing Loew picture houses and have just 
played Capitol theatre in New York. Will Morris 
is handling me. Can you possibly send me a copy 



MARK FISHER 




After a Successful Seven Weeks Engage- 
ment at the Oriental Theatre, Chicago, 
Now Back at the Senate and Harding 
Theatres 
(PUBLIX CIRCUIT) 



of Dec. 10th Exhibitors Herald. I would also appre- 
ciate if you would rush me my cut and diagram 
of my "ad." I am having a circular made and need 
this. I will return same in a few days. Please send 
me this. Thanks for past favors, you can always 
reach me through Ez Eeougb. — Charlie Gregory, T<mr- 
ing Loew's Circuit. 

PRESENTATION ACTS— To the Editor: Would 
you kindly submit your rate's for ads by the inch, 
and also if there is an additional charge for cuts, 
etc. — Koehler & Edith, Touring Publix Circuit. 



Man Shoots at Couple 

in Chicago Oriental 

Patrons at the Chicago Oriental theatre 
were thrown into a panic last week when a 
man opened fire on his wife and his rival 
in the theatre. Women shrieked and men 
fled when they saw the gun and heard the 
woman's cry. The assailant was captured 
by a policeman in the house. 

The Stratford theatre, another Chicago 
house, was thrown into a similar state of 
excitement when a man attacked another 
man alleged to have broken up his home. 
The man, severely beaten with an iron club, 
was taken to a hospital and is said to be 
near death. 



Push Canadian Film 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

TORONTO, Jan. 10.— Canadian Interna- 
tional Films, Ltd., with head office at Toronto 
and studios at Trenton, Ont., is making, rapid 
strides in the production of the all-Canadian 
picture, "Carry On Sergeant," by Captain 
Bruce Bairnsfather. The little town of Tren- 
ton has become quite a mecca for sightseers. 



Have You Ordered 
Your Copy Yet? 

Buy from Your Local 
Music Store, 25p.r cTp" 



forefc's 



For Clocking Motion Pictures 




TIMING AND CUEING PAD 
OiganistsMasical DirecbirsMc- 

B, RUJOLPH BERLINER 



Villa Moret, Inc. 

Publishers 
Kress Bldg. San Francisco 



UNIFORMS 



FOR HOUSE 
ATTACHES 



COSTUMES 



FOR STAGE 
PRESENTATIONS 



BROOKS 



1437 B'way 
N. Y. Gtf 



32 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



STAGE SHOWS 

Chicago Avalon 

Week Ending January 8 

Roy Deitrich, a very popular presentation singer in 
this town, made his debnt this week as stage band 
leader at this house. Althougrh Roy has only been a 
leader a short time, he is by far more talented in 
this direction than Buddy Fisher whom he replaced. 
The opening show although not of an expensive set- 
ting was very pleasing and everything took place in 
a smooth manner. Clyde Hood the producer should 
be complimented for the many novel ideas that he 
injects into his shows. The opening ran as follows: 

Opening: band playing behind scrim as the house 
ballet consisting of 15 girls did a simple routine, 
later all going into a vocal to the tune of "Who" 
using special lyrics to introduce the new leader. 
After which the band struck up a tune of "Blue 
Heaven" as the same girls made their reappearance 
on the decorated stairs each holding a large feathered 
fan and as Roy sang the last few lines of the chorus 
back-stage, he made his entrance through the back- 
drop center to a fine reception, as the girls exited on 
either side. 

The next band number was a very clever arrange- 
ment of "Moonlit Waters" in which the boys put all 
they had into their instruments with several of them 
doing specialties. Deitrich the new leader proved 
from the beginning that he had good qualities as a 
conductor and his appearance and personality made 
an instant hit with this audience. 

LaVare Brothers and Pingree were the first spe- 
cialty artists to start out the program with the 
boys opening in hokum tuxedos to a few eccentric 
taps later going into a burlesque Apache routine with 
one of the boys doing the female. The girl in this 
instance was only used for a foil. The first part 
of their routine waB for laugh purposes only, and 
the only outstanding feature was the back-bend on 
the chair which turned out to be a very difficult 
hand-balancing feature. They won a very hearty re- 
ception. 

This was followed by the ballet again dancing a 
routine to the band's arrangement of "Just Imagine." 
One noticeable thing about this ballet waa that they 
needed more coaching or lacked the interest to work 



in line. Probably eight girls given a better routine 
would have accomplished the same effect. 

This was followed by another band arrangement 
called "Brotherly Love" which turned out to be a 
very good hot time and which again proved the 
capabilities of these men as musicians, in which a 
number of specialties were intermingled. 

Next Roy introduced a brother and sister act under 
the name of Jack and May Fay but from all indica- 
tions the reporter believes that they are a standard 
team seen in other picture houses before now work- 
ing under an assumed name. The routine rendered 
was mostly on the toes and we must say that in 
this line they are finished artists. 

Roy Deitrich next stepped up to the footlights and 
sang "Baby Feet," in his appealing and well-rounded 
voice. There is one thing about Roy, his enunciation 
is perfect and no matter what song he may sing, he 
puts the character and feeling in both the lyrics and 
melody. His appreciation was shown by the tremend- 
ous applause and an encore which he was compelled 
to give. 

The next artist on the bill was Lamberti, a 
xylophone artist who manges to mingle good musician- 
ship with clever comedy antics. Lamberti possesses 
a very smart line of chatter that he diBi)erses 
throughout his routine of playing which makes him 
almost as good a comedian as a musician. He played 
"Stars and Stripes," "Humoresque" and "The Prison 
Scene from II Trovatore." syncopating some of the' 
tunes which removed all doubts from the minds of 
those that were under the impression that he was 
just a comedian but not a musician. It can be 
easily said that Lamberti was the hit of the show 
for he stopped it in two different places and deserved 
all the applause for he is without a doubt a very 
clever showman. He should find a great future in 
this type of work. 

Finale: A novel finish with the band playing an 
arrangement of "Lucky Day" as the house ballet 
posed on staircase gradually descended each carrying 
a large horseshoe hoisted up over their heads in 
arch form as a huge horseshoe appeared in the center 
background with the title "Hello 1928" as Roy sang 
the two last lines as the inscription "Good Luck 
to You" was illuminated on the smaller horseshoes 
worn by the girls. 

Observation: This reporter remembers when Deit- 
rich made his first appearance as a band leader 
out of town some few weeks ago and must say that 
with the co-operation of the new management he will 
in all probability turn out to be a very capable 
director who should make as large a following in 
this capacity as he has in the past with his splendid 




JESSE CRAWFORD 

Back at the 

CHICAGO THEATRE, CHICAGO 

For Three Weeks 

Mrs. Jessie Crawford is still at the Paramount Theatre, New York 



PEGGY 



ROSS 



CHAMBERLIN and HIMES 

(Po9itively the World's Worst Apache Dancers) 

Featured Comedy Dancers 
"ZIEGFELD FOLLIES OF 1927" 
Now Playing New Amsterdam Theatre, New York City 

Production Representative — Leo Fitzgerald 



AL MARKELL and FAUN gay 

"A LAUGH WITH EVERY STEP" 
Featured with JACK PARTINGTON'S "FLORIDA" PUBLIX Unit 
Now Touring Publix Circuit 

HELLER and RILEY are also playing Direction of MAX TURNER— 

Deluxe Picture Houses William Morris Agency 



HENRY MURTAGH 

After 60 Solid Weeks at the Organ of the 
CHICAGO THEATRE, CHICAGO 

Is Now Vacationing 



Boston Metropolitan 

Week Ending January 6 

"Musical Minatnres" was the overture played by the 
Metropolitan grand orchestra under the direction of 
Arthur Geissler. It consisted of popular classics, 
"Then You'll Remember Me," with tenor solo; "Last 
Rose of Summer," soprano solo and orchestra; "Hun- 
garian Rhapsody," piano solo; and "Liebestraume," 
with dancers and grand ensemble. 

The Arthur Martel organ concert this time was 
composed of two "Favoriet Songs of Famous People," 
and these two included "Dancing Tambourines," and 
"Dance of the Toys." 

Gene Rodemich and the famous stage band pre- 
sented "Russian Revels," a Jack Partington produc- 
tion. The band boys were in picturesque RHissian 
costumes, and llkevrise the actors were dressed in the 
colorful costumes of that country. The scene was 
supposed to represent a Russian folk festival. 

The BerkoS Girls and the Don Vocal Poor put on 
a song and dance to start things off. Then Stella 
Stepanoff and M. Vodnoy got a good laugh with their 
funny costumes and "dumb" dancing. The stage 
band then played a Russian Fantasy which had the 
familiar tune of "Volga Boatman" running through 
it, only jazzed this time. 

The Ormond Sisters, a very clever and versatile 
trio, did a dance of the Wooden Soldiers next. After- 
wards they danced some fast steps in contrast. Wo 
could hardly believe anyone who could be so stiff 
and wooden-soldier-like would be able to limber up 
so much. 

The Berkoff Girls came on again, this time in a 
rope dance. Their feats with the jumprope, and 
their acrobatic stunts got a good hand. "I Love My 
Volga Boatman" was then played by the band. They 
had big grotesque masks over their instruments which 
looked as though they were their own faces, and made 
a funny appearance. 

The versatile Ormond trio came back again for a 
vocal rendering of "My Blue Heaven," and an encore, 
"My Baby's in Love with Me." They were in cute 
farmerette costume. 

The Berkoff Sisters with Frieda and Louis Berkoff 
did some fast acrobatic dancing for three encores, 
and the Don volcal quartette sang "Rose of the 
Volga." 

Finale was a reappearance of the entire company 
in singing and dancing feature. 

The film was "Beau Sabreur" with Garry .Cooper 
and Evein Brent. 



Des Moines Capitol 

Week Ending January 6 

Sjmcopation with a dash of more subdued music 
made "Dancing Brides" at the Capitol a popular and 
enticing bit of entertainment. This is a John Murray 
Anderson production, in itself, comment enough. 

Melva Moore sang "Voices of Spring" charmingly. 
Jules and Josie Walton did an original bridge and 
groom number and other eccentric duos with their 
cleverly trained dancing feet. Two ensemble ninn- 
bers with the Lenora steppers were commendable. 

Milo, the hobo, whistled, chirped and did other 
interesting and fascinating stunts with his mouth as 
the instrument. Audiences were insistent in demand- 
ing returns and more of them. 

Paul Spor, master of ceremonies, gave two spe- 
cialties for good measure and directed his band 
through several new and classy musical offerings. 

Herbert Lee Koch made capital of the New Year 
spirit by playing an organ solo, "Sing Out the Old, 
Sing in the New." This was most effective. 

Jacques Blumber, lead the orchestra through the 
Irish music which accompanied, "Rose of Killarney," 
a film romance in color. 

"Her Wild Oat" was the feature. 

{Continued on page 33) 



Dick Marjori* 

MAXWELL & LEE 

"Just Jesters" 

This Week 
at the 
MAIN STREET 
KANSAS CITY 

Presentation 

Direction 
Wm. Morris 

Agency 
Vaudeville 
Direction 
The Simon 
Agency 




January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



33 




LOS4\S STAGE SHOWS 



about 
Everyone 



Gee: it's great to know that a large family of 
more than 17,000. . . . did I say family, why that's 
an army. . . . and that's just what we have now as 
loyal readers every week. . . . This amount grew 
from the recent merger of Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World. . . . Well, let's go then 
boys! Lend me your ears if you're ready for 6ome 
scandal. . . . The first big news is that Fanchon & 
Marco, have just formed a new corporation with 
West Coast Theatres to supply stageshows in all 
their houses. . . . The next big news is that our 
friend, Jesse Crawford, is back at the Chicago thea- 
tre, Chicago, as guest organist. . . . Henry B. Mur- 
tagh, just finished 60 weeks there as featured organ- 
ist. . . . Mark Fisher had a bad cold last week and 
wae compelled to stay out of the Senate, but this 
week he returns to the Harding theatre, Chicago. 
. . . What a welcome he will get. ... I bet that 
"Hank" Lustgarten is glad to see him back. . . . 
Oh, say fellers! Did you know that Al Belasco, who 
rotates with Mark Fisher was married recently? No, 
well he was and what a girl he got. . . . Lucky 
boy. . . . Just got a letter from Joe Alexander, who 
is now pushing the organ pedals at the new Publix 
house in Birmingham. . . . Joe says everything's fine 
and to say Hello to Ramon Berry. . . • Charlie Wil- 
kinson, well known arranger is now doing all the 
arranging for Publix in Chicago. . . . We under- 
stand that David Mendoza is making a big hit over 
the radio with his Sunday concert from the Capitol 
theatre. New York. . . . Louis Calabrese and Lenora 
Cori are among the featured artiste that contribute 
to the program. . . . Wallace & Cappo are now 
playing deluxe picture houses in the East. . . . Rick 
& Snyder are back into cafe work after a tour of 
Chicago picture theatres. . . . Nat Kalchein, former- 
ly booker of acts for the W. V. M. A., resigned 
last week. ... It may be the result of the recent 
Keith-Orpheum merger . . . Larry Spier, well known 
song writer and music publisher starts on his sales 
tour this week. . . . Band leaders and organists be- 
ware! .... Lari-y has a bunch of new songs he 
wants to wish on you. . . . Speaking of music pub- 
lishers our good pal, Al Bielin, just returned from 
a trip South. . . . Nobody knows whether it was 
business or pleasure. . . . Jack Knight, supervisor of 
all B. & K. and L. & T. Chicago theatres is back 
on the job after a major operation. . . . Isham 
Jones, is now leading a band at Mann's Rainbo Gar- 
dens, Chicago, where that new Spanish game called 
Jai-Alai, but pronounced "Hi-li" is being played. 
. . . You ought to try it sometime when you're in 
town. . . . While on the subject of leaders we have 
word that Ralph Pollack has been transferred to the 
new Publix in Birmingham. . . . Ralph was former- 
ly at Saenger'e in New Orleans. . . . Don Migruel 
Galvan, is still drawing big crowds at the Texas in 
San Antonio, as the local stage band leader. . . . 
Now that Roy Deitrich has taken Baddy Fisher's 
place at the Avalon theatre, Chicago, as stage band 
leader, the "Right Club" will continue to entertain 
"kiddies" every Saturday with Roy officiating. . . . 
Word comes from Holljrwood that Cousin Ralph Gallo 
will soon have a leading part in large film produc- 
tion. . . . Ralph has been doing a lot of dancing 
for Fanchon & Marco. . . . Speaking of dancers the 
Chester Hale Girls will be one of the features of 
the new Joe Stanley show coming to town here next 
week. ... If you think they're great look up Mar- 
kerfs American Rockets, they sure know their steps. 
. . . Novelle Bros., have resumed their third tour of 
picture houses for Publix. ... A letter from Milton 
Slosser states that he can't get along without our 
book. . . . I'm glad of that, now I'm sure to hold 
my job. . . . Reports have it that Rube Scholz, fea- 
tured organist for the Mojeska of Milwaukee, will 
soon leave that house for another. . . . For the 
benefit of those who don't know it, let me say right 
here that Jack Lavin, Chicago manager for Villa 
Moret, has gone and married Martha Young, the 
president's secretary. . . . Give him credit for good 
taste, boys. . . . Well, say Jack has nothing on 
Charlie Ealey, band leader for Marks Bros., he also 
went and got himself someone to support too. . . . 
Looks like I'll have to grab myself somebody to 
love. . . . Will some poor hard working girl send in 
her photo for first call. . . . Alois Reiser has re- 
placed Nathaniel Shilkret at the Mark Strand thea- 
tre In New York, as its musical director. 




(Continued from page 32) 

Chicago Granada 

Weed Ending January 8 

This reporter entered the auditorium of the Granada 
just as the Vitaphone presentation, with Bartram and 
Saxon, started. We've been in a theatre when an 
act was given the merry hah, hah, but this is the 
first occasion that this writer has been present when 
a Vitaphone act was treated similarly. Bartram and 
Saxon are the two who walked off a stage recently 
in Chicago, thereby gaining few if any friends. 

For the stageshow, Charles Kaley gave a good per- 
formance. The show opened in front of a drop 
representing a huge flower pot. It was attractive 
and good background for the bevy of dancers who 
were dressed in pastel colored gowns. 

The act opened with a feminine soloist, followed 
by the entrance of the dancers through four circular 
holes. Following their routine dance, the drop lifted, 
revealing the orchestra. 

First by the orchestra was an harmonious arrange- 
ment of the two selections, "Following the Sun 
Around" and "Rio Rita." It made a good introduc- 
tory number and was appreciated by the payees. 

Joe, Evelyn & Harry, song and dance artists, 
amuse, although Evelyn did not win the response that 
was accorded Joe and Harry, who are two clever 
steppers. Their duet dance brought a good hand. 
Evelyn's solo dance failed to click. 

Thelma Edwards won approval with her classical 
and muscle dance. She held the spot billing under 
Kaley for the week. 

The orchestra's next was "Singapore," with the 
drop overhead rising. The eight dancers entered 
in a dimly lighted stage, dressed as coolies. These 
costumes then were converted into beautiful long- 
trained gowns merely by dropping the cape affect. 

Charles Kaley sang the theme piece of the motion 
picture, "Seventh Heaven," which is "My Diane." 
This brought a big hand, showing Kaley's popularity 
at the North Side house. 

The finale was effective with the eight dancing girls 
working behind a varied colored transpai'ent drop 
which was moved up and down. 



Milwaukee Wisconsin 

Week Ending January 6 

"Hello, 1928" is this week's offering on the Wiscon- 
sin stage. The curtains part on a night club scene, 
all the boys in tuxes with the leader and the Eight 
Abbott Dancers seated about a banquet table. As 
the noise of the merrymakers subsides the dancers do 
their stuff after which they seat themselves in front 
of the table, while the band master engages in 
"Speech" joined at various times during the selection 
by members of his band. 

As the Eight Abbott girls danced their way off 
the stage, a very versatile young miss, Auriole Craven, 
played on a violin "Charmaine," accompanying her- 
self to a snatch of dance. She received a big hand 
and came back to sing, "Just Say O. K.," and al- 
though the audience asked for more she refused to 
oblige. 

That popular number, "Among My Souvenirs" was 
then played by the band with another young man, 
unnamed, singing the chorus in the absence of Billy 
Meyers. The song was well sung and played and 
went over big. 

Horton Spnrr, a dancer of no small note, next 
obliged with some very clever soft shoe dancing fol- 
lowed by a slow motion exhibition of a golf player. 
(Continued on page 34) 



Baby Dorothy Johnson 

World's Yovingest Saxophonist 
Playing Deluxe Theatres 




Just Completed a 
Successful Tour of 
B & K and L & T 
Theatres 



Vaudeville — 

Direction, The Simon 
Agency 

Picture Houses — 

Direction, Max Turner- 
Wm. Morris Agency 



With AnyTEIST'^ 



LEQ FEIST INC 

231-5 w. -40^ST. 



34 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE 



WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



STAGE SHOWS 



{Continued from page 33) 

Spurr's dance was followed by a piano solo by the 
stagehand leader, which received big applause. He 
gets as big an applause for his claBsical selections 
as many other players get for popular numbers. 

The Eight Abbott Dancers next obliged with a 
clever dance in which they were all attired in full 
dress suits including the silk top hats. The number 
was well done and went over big. 

Eva Mandell helped to jolly up the crowd with 
fun and peppy songs. She sang among her numbers, 
"It's a Happy Old World After All," "Nobody Loves 
a Pat Girl," "Ho, Ho, Hay, Hay." She went over 
as big as she is fat, which is saying a lot. 

Two clownish dancing violinists, the Novelle Broth- 
ers, tickled the audience with their acrobatic stunts 
while playing the violin. They ended up their act 
with their well known imitation of two love birds 
which went over big. 

The grande finale brought back the Eight Abbott 
Dancers in a hot dance number, while confetti was 
dropped from above the stage, and a galaxy of lights 
were lit inside the banquet table adding much to the 
color of the scene. 

The photoplay is Clara Bow in "Get Your Man." 

Atlanta Howard 

Week Ending January 6 

Al Short and his Melody Boys presented "Banjo- 
mania," publix unit, at the Howard this week, gain- 
ing considerable recognition and approval from both 
critics and good audiences. 

The Thompson Sisters appeared first, introduced in 
a clever and snappy banjo number. Especially pretty 
were the stage arrangements and settings, carrying 
out the banjo idea and permeated by a contagious 
jazz atmosphere. 

Morgan and Stone, also banjo performers, came 
next, drawing applause with their act. 

Margaret Ball proved an appreciated danseure in a 
colorful aesthetic dance. Limber Legs Edward, ec- 
centric dancer, brought so loud a hand that he stopped 
the show. 

The Byron Sisters, billed and known as "The Sun- 
shine Girls," were well liked songsters and offered 
several popular numbers. 

Eddie Hill, singing comedian, went over well and 
brought the show to a stand still for an encore. 

A chorus of eight well trained girls gave several 
unique formations as banjo girls. 

Al Short and his Melody Boys were at their posts 
drawing the usual applause. George Lee Hamrick 
rendered "Moon Melodies" as added attraction on 
the organ. 

"Banjomania" clicked and received a good hand, 
all told. 



Chicago Sheridan 

Week Ending January 8 

This week's program at the Sheridan, called Revels 
of 1928, went over big. 

The first number, "There Must Be Somebody Else," 
was played by the orchestra under the leadership of 
Verne Buck, and received a fine hand. 

Douglas and Claire, in "Dances from 1630 to 1930," 
got over some unusual steps. They performed first, 
while dressed ini Puritan clothes, and locked together 
hands and feet in stocks, to the "Blue Law Blues," 
and then did a blackbottom to "Bye, Bye, Black- 
bird." After a fast solo by Douglas, they came on 
again in an oversized clown suit, that they were 
both able to get into at the same time. This also 
brought a good hand. 

Libby Coren, attired in a stunning white silk 
winter outfit, was next singing "Here Comes My 
Sugar," and "O, Look at That Baby" to Verne Buck, 
that tickeled the audience. Buck answered her as an 
encore singing the same song. She then did musical 
comedy high kicking, and was called for another 
encore. 

The orchestra next played a medly of 1927 songs, 
which included "Just Another Day," "A Shady Tree," 
"Annabelle Lee" and "My Blue Heaven." During 
these numbers Buck played at different times on the 
saxophone, clarinet, and violin. Buck sang "O Kay," 
with the orchestra, singing alternately, with him, 
Frank Wilson sang "My Blue Heaven," while Buck 
played the violin, and this went over so big they had 
to give three encores. 

Pisano and Landauer, two big butter and egg men, 
came out to "The Wearing of the Green," and after 
slinging a little balogna that brought a hearty laugh, 
Landauer sang "Just a Memory" seriously, and the 
audience liked it very much. For an encore he 
"gargled" the same number. These boys were re- 
quired to appear again and again, and they seemed 
to enjoy the fun as much as the audience did. 

Against a background representing a scene in 
"7th Heaven," the Fox motion picture which was 
being presented as the feature, Sylvia Peterson, 
dressed as "Diane," sang the selection which was 
used as the theme for the film. Just before she 
finished the scrim was lowered, and the motion pic- 
ture began. This received good applause. 



Pittsburgh Penn 

Week Ending January 7 

The stage presentation was called "New Year's 
Follies," an appropriate title for a show this time 
of the year. The Penn Rockets opened with a 
dance stepped to the tune of "Baltimore." 

Overture was "Tannhauser" with pit orchestra 
playing number straight. Then scrim on stage lights 
up and Harman and Band play dance arrangement of 
number with both bands together at finish, one play- 
ing it "hot" and the other symphonic. Very good 
stunt not a new idea, but got and deserved all the 
applause. 

The feature, "Sorrell and Son," made the show a 
little longer than usual. 



Dave Harman and Band in their third week did 
"Tiger Rag," giving all the men a chance to show 
their talents with Harry Peru, the drammer, getting 
the edge on applaiise. 

Fred Martin in a sailor suit gave some rubber leg 
dancing and managed to stop the show. 

Bell and Coates next with little piano do harmony 
songs but do not come up to the grade of teams heard 
here lately. Their best number was "The Song Is 
Ended." The main trouble with the team is poor 
enunciation. 

Van Tyson and Van doing fast acrobatic and tap 
dancing followed and they also fell short of the 
mark of quality which is quite high here. Band 
next playing a medley including "Mississippi Mud," 
a vocal solo by Dave, and then the final with all on 
board a good finish that received good applause. 

Chicago Norshore 

Week Ending January 8 

There is one motion picture neighborhood house 
in Chicago where the audience surely does have a 
lot of fun, and that place is the Norshore, where 
Al Kvale and His Jazz Collegians cavort around. 
This week's show was called "Hello 1928," and was 
jost one big hit. 

Two goofs, dressed in "hindu" garb, were bend- 
ing over a gold-fish bowl placed on a small table, 
when the curtain went up. One was telling the 
other what the new year would bring, and when 
the "magician" said that there would be a return 
bout, (he didn't say "fight") between Tunney and 
Dempsey, and that Rickard was holding a school to 
teach referees to count, there was loud applause. 

The Eight pretty Gould Girls came out on a spe- 
cially constructed runway in front of the orchestra 
pit, and sang "We Ought to Be Happy (because we've 
made you happy)," and then went into a routine in 
front of a scrim on which was printed the calendar 
of 1928. 

For the first number the orchestra played "What'U 
You Do?" with a carlinet solo by Kvale. 

Pauline Gaskins came out smiling and sang "Didn't 
I Tell You That You'd Come Back?" to Kvale. Her 
dancing was hot, and she left amid loud applause. 

Mario and Lazarin, two troubadours, were next 
with "Just a Memory," and some comedy medley 
of operatic arias. They were called for two encores 
for "When Day Is Done," which they gave very well. 

The Gould Girls, in high silk hats and capes, next 
did a routine to a number of operatic medleys. 

Jay Mack, foot and harmonica artist, did his stuff 
to "Is She My Girl Friend?" and was called for an 
encore. 

"Did You Mean It?" was then played by the or- 
chestra. 

The house lights were extinguished, and when the 
spot finally "found" the center of the stage, there 
were two funny looking comedians. Burns and Kissen, 
whose "Dank Yous" convulsed the audience. Their 
first song was to the tune of "America I Love 
You" ; then after doing a Chinese characterization, 
they gave their interpretation of "In a Little Spanish 
Town." For an encore they sang "Broken Hreated," 
and were called again. They pleased all right. 

"Shaken the Blues Away" was the Finale played by 
Al Kvale and his boys. 



Omaha Riviera 

Week Ending January S 

In view of the sub-zero weather prevailing, a trip 
with Jimmy Ellard to "Dixieland" was most oppor- 
tune the first week of this year. Jimmy presented 
this New York Stage show by Jack Parringten at 
the Riviera. 

Joe Penner, comedian of "Greenwich Follies," was 
the principal part of the show. His ludricous 
grimaces and comic contortions made a big hit. 
Edith Griffith was back with a group of new songs 
and the Jubilee Four sang some effective songs amid 
attractive settings. 

In the dancing line Charles Henry did a "Lucky 
Lindy" Charleston which was a little bit of every- 
thing, Lnella Lee danced acrobatically and Rapp and 
Morris did some difficult and clever dancing. 

Of the standing attractions, Jimmy Ellard sang 
"The Big Tin Pan Parade," a kiddie number ; Fred- 
erick Schmitt and the pit orchestra put on "Auld 
Lang Syne," and George Johnson at the organ played 
old and new songs. "The Private Life of Helen or 
Troy" was the feature film. 

These performers also participated in the New 
Year's Eve Show put on by Manager A. G. Stolte. 
They had much competition from members of the 
audience who broke into the program with strains 
of "Sweet Adaline." Despite the fact that it was 
the coldest New Year's Eve in 43 years, the house 
was filled and the party successful. 

As the New Year arrived, 1928 personified broke 
through a big egg and stepped out upon an elevated 
stage. Stolte's distribution of string confetti and 
balloons was particularly effective. 




FRED KINSLEY 

Featured Or^ztnist 

KEITH'S HIPPODROME, NEW YORK 

Featuring Original Solos 



BILLY POND 

SOLO ORGANIST 

STATE THEATRE 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN 



Walter Flandorf 

SOLO ORGANIST 

for theatres 
and 
recitals 

CHICAGO 




January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



35 



Chicago Oriental 

Week Ending January 6 

Paul Ash calls his show this week, "Pickings from 
Paris," and the picking is good. The show opens 
with the soft strains of the "Marseilles." The cur- 
tain parts to reveal the interior of a woman's hat 
shop. Paul Small and two girls come on. The girls 
do a short dance and then Paul Small sings a short 
song in keeping with the stage setting. Ned Miller 
also comes on to sing a short song. 

Then Paul Ash enters as if to buy a hat. The 
Oriental Girls enter to do a short routine, and receive 
a good hand. Ash then announces that he has 
brought home a new number called, "Paree." It is a 
snappy number with good time and arrangement. It 
gets a fine hand. 

Paul Small and Ned Miller enter to sing, "What 
Are You Waiting for, Mary," and get a good ap- 
plause. Then a young girl who Paul announces as 
Little Alice Kennedy comes on to sing and the way 
she does and the way the audience applauds her, it 
looks as if Paul has found another Peggy Bemier. 
She sings, "A Darn Good Man to Have Hanging 
Around," two comedy eongs and then, "Just Look at 
That Baby." She stops the show and the audience 
beg for more. 

The Oriental Girls next do an Apache dance. Each 
has a large rag doll which appears to be a dancing 
partner. The number is great and gets that kind of 
an applause. 

Dan Hubbard is next with his banjo and songs 
such as "My Blue Heaven" and "I Can't Believe 
You're in Love With Me." His songs are good but 
his dancing is better and he is rewarded for both 
with a wonderful applause. 

The "Slavish Ehapsody" as played by Ash and his 
band gets a thunderous applause, and the band should 
be given credit for doing as well as it did with this 
difficult number, which was never intended for any 
jazz band to play. 

Earl LeVere is next with his accordion playing, 
jokes and wisecracks. Of course he had to play 
"Sam" and then he plays, "Sundown" and "Side by 
Side," all of which is intermingled with a lot of 
horseplay with Ash. He goes over in great style. 

Then the two Pauls render, "It All Belongs to 
Me," "Since Henry Made a Lady Out of Lizzie" 
and "AVhat Do You Say." Ash mans the piano and 
Small his vocal organs. The songs get a fine recep- 
tion. 

Then comes the finale with all the band and the 
dance team marching down a high flight of stairs 
and the band playing, "Everywhere You Go." The 
finale makes quite a flash. 



Pittsburgh Grand 

Week Ending January 7 

The overture as played by David Broudy and the 
Grand Symphony Orchestra is always one of the 
high spots of the bill if not at times the outstanding 
unit. This week he played selections from "Naughty 
Marietta" interpolating "Blue Heaven," featuring a 
violin solo "Mystery of Life." Elias Breeskin, violin- 
ist, is one of the best in the city and the entire 
combination makes the overture meritorious, and as 
a straight musical number at that. 

After the news came Frank Loforese, basso, with 
a fine voice, singing two numbers, "Roses of Picardy" 
and the aria from "The Barber of Seville." 

Next the Clarion Trumpeters, four girls who are 
way above the average on the cornet. The four play 
"Faust" to open and next do a solo of "My Wild 
Irish Rose," a duet of "Blue Heaven" and a trio with 
piano of "Mighty Lak a Rose." Both scored big. 
A medley of operatic airs closed the act. 

.Feature, Clara Bow in "Get Your Man" and 
comedy completed the show. 



Chicago Uptown 

Week Ending January 8 

Frankie Masters calls his Uptown presentation this 
week, "Moonlit Waters." The stage setting is an 
exterior scene in Venice, and is quite beautiful. The 
first number is the Boris Petroff dancers featuring 
Rose Marino. The ballet is wonderfully costumed and 
does a fine tambourine dance in which Rose Marino 
gives a remarkable toe dance. 

Then Masters and his band do an original ntumber 
called, "So Tired." As Masters sings the song the 
entire band goes to sleep with loud snores echoing 
across the footlights. It is a novel and amusing 
number well done and well received. 

Helen Yorke then gives a fine rendition of "Car- 
nival of Vendee." The applause she received did not 
do her good singing justice. Then comes little 
Sammy Lewis with his topnotch boob dancing. He 
can. wiggle a mean pair of legs and rhythm is his 
middle name. As an encore he does a good imita- 
tion of an ice skater. He gets a fine hand for his 
novelty also. 

This is followed with a band number, and un- 



WeU, WeU, Haven't We 
Heard AU This Before? 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOUSTON. Jan. 4.— Popular mo- 
tion pictures, written and directed as 
a thrust at the pocketbooks of 85 per 
cent of the population with minds of 
a child, are one of the greatest 
factors in the world today. Dr. Louis 
K. Anspacher, noted Jewish play- 
wright, declared at a luncheon of the 
Council of Jewish Women here last 
week. 

While he scathingly assailed the 
industry, he declared the cinema is 
an expression of art and must work 
its way upward. "What the mob 
wants in pictures, which are fast re- 
placing the legitimate stage, are 
corned beef, cabbage, tripe and on- 
ions," the Doctor said. 



usual and extremely pretty arrangement of "Among 
My Souvenirs," during which Frankie and three of 
the band sing it. The number goes over in great 
style and should. 

Then comes the Dancing Trio, two men and one 
giirl. Their fine interpretive classic dance is novel 
and well staged. It is danced to "Rhaiwody in 
Blue." The audience gives thunderous applause for 
this really beautiful number. 

Then come the two boobs from Oklahoma, Fauntle- 
roy and Van. They first play on a couple of broom- 
sticks, then French harps, bellovra, and one musical 
saw, one doing the hitting and the other the manipu- 
lation of the saw. Their old time song for an en- 
core isi just about the best yet. The act gets a 
wonderful hand, and the pair leave with the audi- 
ence asking for more. 

The finale is a beautiful spec with lots of pep and 
beauty. It was a corking good show. 

As a feature for the pit orchestra, Uldrico Mar- 
celli presented another one of his entertaining mtisi- 
cal overtures this week. The selections were titled, 
"Songs of France," added by a motion picture with 
colored process depicting the originality of the 
Apache in which the cripipled violinist loved the 
Apache mate in vain. Throughout this offering a 
man's voice sang off-stage variations from this over- 
ture mainly featuring, "By the Light of the Moon." 

New York Capitol 

Week Ending January 6 

David Mendoza opened the Capitol program this 
week directing his orchestra in Tchaikovsky's "Cap- 
riccio Italien." 

The stage presentation was entitled the "Legend 



of the Pearl." The curtain rises on a dell of ferns 
through which a river is flowing. In the center is 
a huge pearl shell. The Capitol Ballet represents the 
fairies and spirites who dance in and out among 
tha ferns. 

Suddenly two mortals api>ear as the pearl opens 
and a fairy steps out. Rita and Teske Narsoroff 
offer a dance number assisted by the ballet. 

The mortals disobeying the gods by dancing with 
the fairy are punished. They are struck down in a 
storm and lie dead at the feet of the pearl fairy who 
returns to her shell. The curtain falls on the fairies, 
spreading flowers over the mortals. The lighting 
deserves praise in this scene as it is most effective. 
The act seemed to arouse the sympathy of the entire 
audience. 

Walt Roesner, directing The Capitolians in "Pepper 
Pot Revue." is the next presentation. The Chester 
Hale Girls render a dance representing pepper pots 
in black and white costumes. Fain and Dunii sing 
several comical and serious songs which meet with 
great applause. Wallace and Cappo do some fancy 
steps to the tune of the stage orchestra. The orches- 
tra, as its contribution, plays "She Don' Wanna" and 
"Dream Kisses." 

As their special act the Capitol presents Bobby 
Clark and Paul McCullough, those two inimitable 
comedians from "The Ramblers" and "Music Box 
Revue." These funny fellows offer their ever-funny 
act of intervievdng a reporter outside the Capital in 
Washington. They pull their same old gage and 
sing their same old songs which never fail to send 
the audience into convulsions. After many encores 
they managed to stagger off the stage. 

As the closing number the Chester Hale Girls 
offered a ballet number assisted by the entire com- 
pany. 



New York Roxy 

Week Ending January 6 

As the opening number the Roxy Symphony Or- 
chestra played "Orpheus," directed by Emo Rapee. 
The first presentation act was Marie Gambarelli in 
a dance number called "I^a Libellule," in which she 
represented a moonbeam and rendered a moonbeam 
dance. 

"Twilight," a potpourri of Russian folk songs, was 
sung by the Russian Cathedral Choir. Far from a 
Cathedral they were in a birch forest. The voices 
were very good and well liked. Following the Six- 
teen Roxyettes gave a specialty dance. 

Sevillana was the next offering. A Spanish market 
filled with peasants, represented by the ensemble, 
was the background for this scene. This was assisted 
by the Ballet Corps which served as an introduction 
to Addison Fowler and Florenz Tamara, those two 
incomparable dancers who have just returned from 
an European tour. There is no one more graceful 
than Florenz Tamara. 

The closing act was a Lyric Pageant, "Joan of 
Arc," in six scenes. Garda Maire as Joan of Arc 
and Douglas Stanbury as the Archbishop were the 
leading roles. This was a pageant of the life of 



J. VIRGIL HUFFMAN 

Featured Organist 

LOEWS PALACE, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

(Leading De Luxe Theatre in Town) 



W. REMINGTON WELCH 

SOLO ORGANIST 

TIFFIN THEATRE CHICAGO 

(Solos and Community Sings) 



SHANNON'S PLAYTIME FROLICS 

Acrobatic and Dancing Novelty Surprise 
Now Touring KEITH-ALBEE-ORPHEUM Circuit 

Direction— EZ KEGUGH— Woods Theatre Bldg., Chicago 



36 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



Some Massachusetts Showmen 





Among the Bay State's leading purveyors ol film fare are these exhibitors. They are 
(from left to right) M. Melincoff of the Rialto, Lowell; Victor M. Lewis of the Prov- 
incetown, Provincetown ; W. L. Bigley of the Lincoln, Quincey Point; and George 
Hammond of the Victory, Lowell. 



Joan of Are. The scenes represented Joan's House, 
the Vision, the Departure, a Dungeon, the Proces- 
sion, and the Market Place. The scenes and lighting 
effects were beautiful and the costumes perfect, but 
the play was so sad and dreary that it left the peo- 
ple's spirits dampened. 



New York Paramount 

Week Ending January 6 

The program opens with "The Bohemian Girl" 
played by the Paramount Orchestra under the direc- 
tion of Irvin Talbot. 

Following Mrs. Jesse Crawford played on the organ 
"Up in the Clouds," "Wonderful," "My Heart Stood 
Still," and "Varsity Drag." She never fails to please 
her attentive listeners. 

The presentation was "Blue Plate." The curtain 
rises on the stage orchestra behind which is a huge 
blue plate. The entire presentation is offered in 
nothing but blue and white. 

"Little Wooden Shoes," sung by Lorraine Trumler 
and danced by the Foster Girls, was the first number. 
Following this was "A Dutch Treat" by Gordon and 
King. This was a comical skit of dancing and sing- 
ing to the tune of a saw. Tom Long and Sally Small 
did some dancing followed by Koehler and Edith, two 
very good roller skaters. 

The finale, entitled "Windmill," was sung by Lor- 
raine Trumler. The inside of the plate went up, 
showing a windmill in the background with the Bal- 
let Girls elLmbing over it and hanging from the vanes 
in very perilous positions while the windmill goes 
around. The scene was beautifully done and pleased 
the entire house. 



Lupe Velez Wins Suit 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10.— Lupe Velez, a 
featured player in "Douglas Fairbanks as the 
Gaucho," has agreed to pay Frank A. Wood- 
yard $50,000. Woodyard brought suit as her 
"discoverer." The case was settled out of court. 



Initiation Shocking — 
Members Lose Heart 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ST. LOUIS, Jan. 10.— The Sons and 
Daughters of I Will Arise, St. Louis 
Chapter, has temporarily passed out 
of the theatrical picture in St. Louis. 
Orders from up front were for the 
high chieftains to quit their initia- 
tions of willing and unwilling pros- 
pects. 

The officers are the backstage men 
of the Ambassador theatre and the 
members included certain actors and 
other artists who have appeared at 
the theatre since it was opened in 
August, 1926. Each had survived the 
rigorous initiation without serious 
consequences. But a blonde neophyte 
stated in emphatic terms she re- 
garded the whole procedure as posi- 
tively shocking. It is not denied that 
the initiation was somewhat shock- 
ing — electrically so. Watt? 



Sunday Shows Fought by 
Church in Amarillo, Texas 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

AMARILLO, TEXAS, Jan. 10.— When the 
Dent Theatres tested the law here by run- 
ning Sunday shows, their manager, W. R. 
Dinch, of the Mission theatre, was arrested. 
The Baptist church is fighting the move for 
Sunday motion pictures and is threatening to 
oust all members who attend such presenta- 
tions. 



JOE KAYSER 



That 
Personality 
Director 

and 
Master 

of 

Ceremonies 

Diversey 
Theatre 

Chicago 




Sweetest Girl Manager? 
Miss Helen B. Morley 
Is First Nominated 



WE HAVE had a look into the careers 
of the youngest managers, have con- 
gratulated the oldest managers of a number 
of houses, and now 
we have with us in 
Miss Helen B. Mor- 
ley of the Rialto 
theatre at Tacoma, 
Wash., a candidate 
for the title of 
sweetest woman- 
manager. By her 
winsome personality, 
unfaltering loyalty, 
and universal popu- 
larity among the 
younger generation, 
she has succeeded in 
materially increasing 
the attendance at 
this theatre. 

Miss Morley is a graduate of the Stadium 
high school there, and after completing her 
course with high honors four years ago, 
she was appointed chief usherette at the 
Rialto, in charge of a crew of 12 girls. 

Several months ago, due to the local 
disturbance among the musicians and va- 
rious other changes, she was appointed 
manager of the Rialto by E. C. Jeffress, 
West Coast Theatres representative here. 
This house has a seating capacity of 1400, 
and the fair manager reports that business 
is "away better than last year." 




Miss Helen B. Morley 



Harris Amusement Co, 
Fetes 30th Anniversary 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

PITTSBURGH, Jan. 10. — The Harris- 
Amusement Company has made arrangements 
to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the 
founding of the firm, by the late Senator John 
P. Harris, throughout the rest of the month 
of January. Each week will introduce de 
luxe programs of Keith-Albee vaudeville and 
feature photoplays at all their theatres. 

Every theatre in the circuit is to be ornately 
decorated. The inevitable birthday cake, with 
its 30 lighted candles, will be in evidence, and 
the whole character of the theatre and its- 
performances will be in celebration of the 
natal anniversary. 

Eighty-five Prints of U, S, 
Farm Film Prove In Use 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 10.— The Department 
of Agriculture motion picture called "The 
Corn Borer and What to Do About It," has- 
proved so valuable that there are now 8S 
prints in circulation. During the last fiscal 
year 8,266 shipments of films have been made 
by the department. 



Two Theatres Too Many 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

PARDEVILLE, WIS., Jan. 10.— B. H. 
Lovell, owner of the Lovell theatre here, has 
bought the equipment of the Liberty theatre- 
and will remodel the Lovell. 



Clarence Brown Recovers 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10.— Clarence BroAvn,. 
director, recovered from an attack of in- 
fluenza and has now returned to the studios- 
after an absence of two weeks. 



lew White 

Ch/e/ Organist 




Exdusiue BrunsuJic/i Artist 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



37 




Talk about modern day salesmanship ! Montgom- 
ery Ward, Chicago's big mail-order house, wanted 
representation on the air one hour every week over 
a net work of radio stations. ... In submitting dif- 
ferent kinds of entertainment to Montgomery Ward, 
the National Broadcasting Company, here in New 
York, relayed a direct wire to Chicago, where the 
comimittee in charge of Montgomery Ward's adver- 
tising, listened in for them to approve or dis-approve. 
. . . In all of these auditions, the different programs 
were just as if they were being sent to the country 
at large, while in reality, the direct wire permitted 
only the committee in Chicago to hear it. . . . That 
in my opinion, is doing things in a big way. . . . 
From latest reports it looks like Nathaniel Shilkret 
landed the job. . . . For the interest of music men, 
the hour will consist of popular music. 

* * * 

Mai Hallet, as an orchestra leader, doesn't mean 
very much to the average Westerner, but to any one 
from ^ew England, he's the daddy of all orchestra 
leaders. . . . The following that Hallet has in those 
North Eastern states surpasses that of even White- 
man's. . . . For a short period every winter, Hallet 
has made it a practice to hit the "alley," usually 
playing at the Arcadia Ballroom. For some reason 
or other this winter will find him at the Arcadia's 
rival, Koscland. . . . He opens there January 16. 
* * » 

Can anyone estimate what Al Jolson's plug on the 
Dodge Brother's radio hour last week meant to a 
music publisher ?. . . . Did you know that the firm of 
Irving Berlin sent a piano player to New Orleans to 
acompany Jolson ! Ponder over this for a minute ; 
A piano player was sent almost two thousand miles 
to play only seven minutes on the radio. . . . Well 
it certainly must have been worth while, because I 
know twenty publishers who would have sent a whole 
orchestra to New Orleans, if Jolson would have sung 
one of their songs. . . . Berlin claims that as a re- 
sult of Jolson singing "Four Walls" they have sold 
more than thirty thousand copies. 

« » * 

Never in the history of Broadway, have the night- 
clubs been faring so badly. . . . Outside of the Rich- 
mond Club, where George Olson and his orchestra 
predominate, the only other club that was doing 
business was the Helen Morgan Club ; having since 
been demolished by prohibition agents the Richmond 
reigns supreme. . . . One of the big reasons for the 
night-club "flop" is the Chop Suey joints. . . . Jtist 
like the automat, they're always crowded. 

* « # 

The Casa Lopez has also been complaining in re- 
gard to business, and from reliable sources, I under- 
stand that Lopez is desirous of quitting the night- 
club racket for the easier and more refined Hotel 
game. . . . Therefore any first class hotel, looking 
for a "crack" band with a big reputation, I feel con- 
fident, can secure the services of Lopez. 

* * « 

It is said, that more than a quarter of a million 
dollars was given away by the music publishers to 
their employees for Christmas, bonuses, presents, etc. : 
And yet, when a publisher goes after a plug some- 
where, he's always crying the blues. 

« * * 

For some unknown reason, "Just A Memory" faded 
out of the picture here in New York quicker than 
any hit tune I can possibly remember. Riding for a 
sensational song, it wasn't over six weeks that you 
didn't hear the song any more. . . . Perhaps this can 
be attributed to the tremendous radio plug the song 
received the first two weeks that it was out. ... at 
that time, there wasn't a night, when you couldn't 
hear "Just A Memory" on the ether at least fifteen 
times. ... It is most-likely for this reason, that the 
tune faded out as quickly as it did. 

« « « 

Gonna take a two weeks trip around the country 
and see some of my friends, so while I'm gone, my 
partner, Sam Coslow is going to "Pinch-hit" this 
column for me. . . . Just let me warn you, that he's 
a very funny fellow so don't be surprised at anything 
he may write. 



ORGAN SOLOS 



Milton Charles (Chicago Oriental) calls his elide 
organ presentation this week, "The Cartoon Contest" 
and both the slides and words are clever, they being 
about the favorite newspaper cartoon characters. He 
plays for the tonsil exercise of his audience "Under 
the Moon." "A Night in June," "There's a Cradle in 
Caroline," and "Just a Memory." The audience 
showed their approval of Charles' work with their 
singing and applause. Charles seems to be making 
himself quite a favorite at the Oriental. 



Arthur Richter (Milwaukee, Wisconsin) offers for 
his selection at the organ, "Tomorrow," with the 
words flashed upon the screen, and the "World Is 
Waiting for the Sunrise." His selections as usual 
are well received. 



Chauncey Haines (Chicago Norshore) called his 
number "Happy New Year" this week, and after a 
few slides telling about the success of Balaban and 
Katz in the last year, and promising to make 1928 
even a bigger and better year, the following selec- 
tions were sung by the audience, "My Blue Heaven," 
"Just Once Again," "Just Like a Butterfly That's 
Caught in the Rain," "Highway Are Happy Ways," 
and "Me and My Shadow." 



Leonard M. Salvo (Chicago Highland) offered this 
week as a community singing stunt songs that had 
a happy trend. They were as follows: "Highways 
Are Happy Ways," "Are You Happy?" and "It's A 
Happy Old World After All." They were illustrated 
by slides and used especially for the holiday pro- 
gram. Since coming here Salvo has been creating a 
nice following for his selections. 



Verne Fordc (Des Moines, Des Moines) used two 
miniature aerals, erected on the organ and bearing 
the conspicuous red and green lights, respectively, 
represented in clever style station WHY in a clever 
radio organ number playing the music incident to the 
stunt and the audience sang. Telegrams from a 
mythical radio audience were flashed on the screen 
and served to amuse. 



W. Remington Welch (Chicago Tiffin) offered 
"Radio Ravings" in which the raving took place as 
follows : "The Minuet," "The Toreador Song," "At 
Dawning," "Together We Two," "Marble Walls Aria 
from The Bohemian Girl," "Rigoletto," "Ces't Vous," 
"It's You," "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" closing 
with "Miss Annabelle Lee." This was all done in 
the form of community singing with special lyrics 
with the various arias and tunes which made the 
solo a novelty from the standpoint of popular and 
classic music. 



Dick Leibert (Pittsburgh Penn) offered "The Beg- 
gar" this week as a solo, using a presentation idea 
with slides projected on a scrim. The slides ex- 
plained about a princess being very rich who gave 
money to beggars providing they deserved it, then 
the prince came along and begged the girl to go into 
a chorus of "The Beggar." Scrim lights go up in 
back showing the prince and princess while the 
prince sang. An Oriental set was used with black 
out at finish. 



Eddie Hanson (Chicago Uptown) calls his organ 
presentation this week, "New Year Resolutions" and 
the entire presentation in slides and songs is tied 
up with this name. He plays "Hallelujah," "This Is 
My Lucky Day," "Are You Really Happy" and "Give 
Mo a Night in June." This was one of the best 
slide presentations seen in some time. The audience 
gives Eddie a good hand as the organ sinks into the 
pit. 



Bill Bennett (Chicago Belpark) presented as a com- 
munity stunt a solo called "Here's Your Chance to 
Broadcast," in which he used the following songs 
with lyric slides: "Blue Heaven," "I Told Them All 
About You," "Blue River," "Among My Souvenirs," 
"What'll You Do," "A Night in June" and for an 
encore "Are You Happy." Since Bennett has taken 
over the organ duties at this house, community sing- 
ing has became quite a popular thing. 



Doc Webb (Chicago Marshall Square) presented 
"Request Night," in which he told the audience 
through slides how his wife attended different thea- 
tres and was very blue from hearing so many blue 
songs that he decided to offer the following: "Blue 
River," "Keep the Home Fires Burning," "There's 
A Long Long Trail" and suggested for a winter 
night, "A Night in June." This was all done in the 
form of community singing with comedy slides. 



SIP S4 

Songs 




FINALLY ON TOP! 
Looks Sensational 

"Among My Souvenirs" (DeSylva- 
Brown & Henderson). 

Still Very Big! 

"My Blue Heaven" (Leo Feist). 
NEXT BEST SELLERS 

"The Song Is Ended" (Irving Berlin). 
"Just a Memory" (Harms). 
"Charmaine" (Sherman Clay). 

JUST LOVE ME (That's All)— Irving Berlin. 
Inc.) — Three Chicago writers including the well 
known band leader, Charles Kaley, have turned out 
a very cute song. 

* * * 

REGIMENTAL SONG — (Watcrson, Berlin & 
Snyder) — This song is from the new show "White 
Eagle," which just opened in New York. This song 
is plugged in the show in the same manner that 
"Song of the Vagabond" was done last year. By 
Rudolf Friml. 

* * • 

WHEN LOVE COMES STEALING— (Robbins 
Music Corp.) — This number has been revised into a 
popular song. The writers of this song have just 
given us two hits, "Charmaine" and "Diane," Emo 
Rapee, Lew Pollack and Walter Hirsch. This song 
will certainly add to the writers prestige. 

« • * 

KEEP SWEEPING THE COBWEBS OFF THE 
MOON — (J. H. Remick & Co.)— An optimistic sonjr 
that lends cheer and is well written up by those 
well know writers, Lewis and Young and Oscar 

Levant. i 

* * * 

SWEET ELAINE — (John E. Hayes, Inc.) — Twenty- 
five years ago these two writers, Richard H. Gerard 
and Harry Armstrong, wrote a song that will live 
forever called, "Sweet Adeline." As this is the first 
song since that time by these writers, it will no 
doubt get the attention of all lovers of popular music 
« 4 • 

PERSIAN RUG — (Villa Moret, Inc.)— An Oriental 

number and one look at the title page and you 
know it must be about a rug. These two writers, 
Gu6 Kahn and Neil Moret, always turn out a good 
song and this is no exception. 

4 4> 4 

MY HEART IS IN THE ROSES— (Leo Feist. Inc.) 

— By Alfred Bryan and Fred Fisher who were at 
one time the leading song writers in the business. 
They have turned out in this song a beautiful waltz 
ballad. 

* • * 

AS LONG AS I LIVE (I'll Love You)— (Lewis- 
Marks Pub. Co.) — Al Lewis, who heads this firm 
and is also one of the writers, knows what the pub- 
lic wants, so this song will no doubt get the atten- 
tion of the publishers for a quick turn over. Writ- 
ten by Al Lewis, Howard Simon, Gerald Marks and 
Emerson Gill. 

« « * 

TOGETHER — (DeSylva-Brown & Henderson) — An- 
other masterpiece by this battery of song writeiB, 
(who are also the publishers). It should take its 
place among the biggest hits. 

4 4 * 

JUST BEFORE YOU BROKE MY HEART— (F. B. 
Haviland Music Co.) — An old fashioned song. Thifl 
publisher has been very successful in the past with 
this type of song. Is well written as to lyrics and 
melody. By Seger Ellis, Art Gillham and George 
Lipschulz. 

* * • 

JOY BELLS — (J. H. Remick & Co.)— As the title 
denotes, these bells later become wedding bells. Aa 
a rule, we always think of weddings in June so this 
song is away ahead of the time. By Cliff Friend and 
Jos. H. Santly. 

« * * 

WHILE THE OTHERS ARE DANCING (I Sit In 
the Corner Alone) — (Henry Waterson) — A story 
about a wall flower who was forgotten in the crowd. 
Well written as a fox trot ballad. By Irving Kahal, 
Francis Wheeler and Sammy Fain. 



38 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



SERVICE TALKS 



Incorporated in this department of Exhibitors Herald, which is a department containing news, in- 
formation and gossip on current productions, is the Moving Picture World department, '^Through 

the Box Office Window.^* 



N. 



"THE SLAVE MART" 



OW and then — not very often — theatre 
billing states a fact. The Chicago theatre billing 
for "The Slave Mart" began with the three 
words — Beautiful Billie Dove. To which I, and 
apparently innumerable other thousands in 
these parts, utter a pleased Amen. If the pic- 
ture, "The Slave Mart," were no more than a 
reason for photographing Billie Dove again and 
again, it would be an adequate attraction. 
Happily, it is much more than that. 

"The Slave Mart" is a story of old New 
Orleans, the New Orleans of 100 years ago, the 
slave-smuggling, picturesque New Orleans of 
which Americans have been permitted to learn 
all too little. This is a tremendous chapter in 
the past of the nation, a chapter apparently un- 
interesting to prosaic writers of history and a 
chapter apparently unfamiliar to the rank and 
file of fictionists. It is a great locale for picture 
makers and I hope the use of it in this instance 
will be followed by the usual landslide of 
quasi-duplications. 

Billie Dove is the belle of New Orleans as 
the picture opens. She would be as attractive, 
no doubt, as the belle of any other place, in- 
cluding Hollywood, but in this setting she has 
the grand manner in her behalf, the delicacy of 
attire, the contrasting highlight of alternate 
splendor and squalor. Above it all she seems 
to float rather than walk through the scenes. 

By the story. Miss Dove is discovered to be 
an octoroon. Her legal owner, portrayed by 
Noah Beery, forces disclosure of this condition 
and offers the slave for sale upon the block. 
The spirited bidding is a tremendous episode, 
Gilbert Roland buying the woman in an abiding 
faith that the colored taint is a fiction, a fact 
established by means and methods which 
ought not be told anyone who plans to see the 
picture. Since each of you should plan to see 
it, I shall not tell the rest. 

This Mr. Roland, by the way, hits his stride 
in this picture. I cared little for him in his 
first two starts, for no definite reason and pos- 
sibly because his assignments were not all they 
should have been, but in this he's a forthright 
young fellow with a deadly sword eye and a 
firm wrist. If there were no danger of attaching 
one of those "second" tags to his career, I 
should say that he is the actor that the public 
thought Valentino was. I hasten to add that 
he has none of the wrong aspects which were 
Valentino's and that I believe this paragraph, 
with its danger of getting into the hands of the 
lay press and setting the newspaper hounds on 



By T. O. SERVICE 

his trail as "The New So-and-So," is a dumb 
crack. It is no less sincere. 

The third important person in the picture is 
Noah Beery and I take occasion to state that 
he is as good in this as he was bad in "The 
Dove." This makes me wonder if the director 
of "The Dove" is responsible for all that 
clinical display of the gentleman's anatomy. 
If this be the case, I apologize to Beery for 
giving him the blame and shift it herewith to 
the director, whose name I have not at hand, 
reserving for the sturdy swashbuckler no more 
than a question as to why he permitted it. 

Yes, you're right, I do consider "The Slave 
Mart" a splendid picture. It is, primarily, good 
entertainment, as every picture shoidd be. It 
is, in addition, a pictorial recreation of a 
highly interesting and little known era of 
American history. Still further, and I count 
this of tremendous importance, it is another 
lens record of the beauty that is Billie Dove's, 
a beauty so overwhelming that I edways forget 
to say she's a great actress, too. 



I 



'FRENCH DRESSING" 



LIKE Lois Wilson, Clive Brook and H. B. 
Warner about as well as any trio of players 
ever assembled in a single cast. And I do 
not dislike LUyan Tashman, particularly in the 
picture at hand. It is with considerable regret, 
therefore, that I register other than pleasure 
with respect to their "French Dressing." I 
hasten to add that I believe a good man with 
a scissors could make it a mighty good picture. 

"French Dressing" is one o6 those semi- 
farcical domestic things that used to be called 
"society pictures" before producers learned to 
set them in Paris and trick them out with light 
captions. There is no better type of entertain- 
ment in picturedom than this — no better eye- 
fare on stage or screen — and although "French 
Dressing" has its limitations within its class it 
is still, to me, a better evening's entertainment 
than at least the conventional nine out of ten 
contemporary offerings. 

The four players mentioned in the opening 
paragraphs are the four important people in 
the picture. Lois Wilson is the too domestic 
wife of H. B. Warner, LUyan Tashman the too 
undomestic divorcee girl friend of the wife, 
Clive Brook the obliging Parisian gentleman 
who does what he can do, which is plenty, to 



restore to the married people a proper appre- 
ciation of each other. Sounds simple enough, 
and very much like dozens of other stories that 
are in common use, but it isn't handled that 
way. It is done with commendable restraint, 
with intriguing variations and with excellent 
tone. The only fault that I find with it, and 
a fault which seemed to stack up that way also 
to a good many of those present, is that the 
thing runs about 20 minutes longer than is 
good for it. 

Toward the close of the picture the loose 
ends are gathered with care rather than grace, 
the sequences are protracted, the captions are 
not strong enough to pull them over, if indeed 
any captions could be, and the close arrives 
a bit tardily. I heartily! advise the un- 
precedented procedure of taking the print into 
the catting room and scissoring it down to 
sprightly length. That done, I think it would 
be a great picture, as great in its kind as any 
save the Menjou and the Vidor classics. 



"THE MO J AVE KID' 



I OB STEELE, latest of the seemingly in- 
exhaustible supply of F B 0 Westerners, takes 
another step toward the goal which none of 
these players seems to miss in "The Mojave 
Kid." I wonder where, and how, this concern 
obtains all these cowboys. 

Without looking into the matter, I have 
gained the idea that somewhere in that great 
state surrounding Hollywood E B 0 must main- 
tain a training school for horsemen, riflemen, 
actormen, for the concern seems eminently 
equipped to stick in its thumb and pull out a 
Western star at any given moment. 

Of "The Mojave Kid" there is to say no 
more than the conventional things that are said 
of every good Western and have been said of 
them since who remembers when. It clicks, 
as it is intended to click, and it entertains as 
Westerns entertain. It is that most staple of 
studio products, "a good Western." 

"TUMBLING RIVER" 

E^XHIBITORS are saying that Mix is mak- 
ing better pictures this year than last, which 
sounds exactly like the statement they've made 
in this connection in all save one of the many 
previous years during which this perpetually 
youthful cowboy has been busying himself 
before the' camera. Without seeing all of the 
Mix pictures of this year, or even of last, I 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



39 



take "Tumbling River" as proof of the general 
statement. For that matter, and to be wholly 
honest, I should accept almost any picture, that 
doesn't put Mix in petticoats, as that proof. 

Tom Mix has, in his pictures as at his playful 
typewriter, that asset which is obtained by 
living. I refer to experience. When he rides 
a horse he rides it in the manner that he knows, 
through countless previous efforts in kind, the 
people who pay to see him ride a horse like 
to see him ride a horse. When he saves the 
gal, captures the villain, enacts a gag, he saves 
the gal, captures the villain or enacts the gag 
in the way that time has demonstrated to be, 
for him, exactly the proper way. 

This is the quality to which I think experts 
refer when they say such things as camera-wise, 
knowing, aware, consummate, clever, gifted — in 
fact all the good words commonly used to 
describe actors. I think it is also the quality 
which sometimes goes by the name of genius, 
inspiration, inner vision. It is, in my unim- 
portant estimate, the one thing that makes an 
actor a dependable, permanent fixture of the 
show business. Unfortunately, it is a thing 
which can be obtained only by dint of hard 
work, which is not so bad, and by living and 
acting for several years, which is not so good. 

At the end of which reasoning — if indeed 
this be reasoning — 1 discover at last the reason 
why (1) the majority of male stars are middle- 
aged (2) the feminine stars of several seasons 
are the best and (3) the only new stars who 
really click are the gals with Mme. Glyn's 
most press-agented possession. (No extra 
charge; of course, for all this.) 

"HOME SWEET HOME" 

N 

O, "Home Sweet Home" is not the name 
of a picture, although I believe there was 
a picture by that title once upon a time. 
It is, in this instance, the caption for Chicago, 
which is "Home Sweet Home" to me and 
about as well equipped with desirable and un- 
desirable aspects as any other home or any 
other place. It is of the latter that I beg leave 
to speak at this time. 

Particularly, I beg leave to speak of the 
mysterious manner in which Chicago theatre- 
owners select the pictures which they exhibit 
to those several of us who must attend these 
theatres more or less regularly if rents are to be 
paid and light bills met. As one who has at- 
tended them rather more than less for the past 
several years, I wish to enter sundry complaints. 

To begin with, I object to the apparent plan 



of saving up all the Spanish pictures for a 
year and then shooting them at us in succession. 
I mean this objection, of course, to apply also 
to the practice of doing likewise with the 
French farces, the Wild Westerns, with the 
college comics, the slapstick features, the 
mystery thrillers, the spectacular specials — and 
you can distend the list at your leisure. I 
use the word "apparent" in describing plan for 
it is inconceivable that the theatre men think 
all this out and do the thing purposefully. 
It seems inconceivable that anyone, much less 
the theatremen of the town that has built the 
greatest theatres in the world, should consider 
this a good policy. 

The way this works out is somewhat as fol- 
lows. It has become impossible to attend more 
than three or four theatres a week without see- 
ing practically duplicate pictures. I consider 
this more than a personal calamity. To wit: 

If it is possible to attend three theatres 
weekly without running into boredom, and 
that's about as much as can be done at this 
time, the average attendance of the individual 
is limited to three times weekly. (As a mat- 
ter of fact it dwindles to less than that, of 
course.) But — and here's my story — if it were 
possible to attend the theatre seven times a 
week without being bored, the average attend- 
ance might be brought up from the present 
once to three or four times. And if that 
wouldn't mean more money, what would? 

I speak, of course, of Chicago. But I think 
the same condition obtains wherever there are 
enough theatres to sustain iL I think, even, 
that exhibitors in the lesser cities give too little 
thought to this variation of successive attrac- 
tions. I think, lastly, that here lies a more 
profitable field for thought than in any of the 
dozens of other places where people in the 
trade are accustomed to looking for profit. 



I 



FREEDOM OF SPEECH 



T was with a surging emotion, if I may 
speak strongly, that I perused the columns of 
"What the Picture Did for Me" in last week's 
issue. Here, alongside the wholehearted re- 
ports of all the old regulars, were equally 
wholehearted reports from the new members 
of the family. The great cause of free speech 
had gained new supporters. The great work 
of "What the Picture Did for Me" had gained, 
overnight, a new reserve strength, a new power 
in the field. 

The testimony of one who has beheld the 
influence of the original reports department at 



work over a substantial period of years may be 
, interesting. I have had, by reason of my ef- 
forts along a parallel line, an extremely ad- 
vantageous viewpoint from which to witness the 
effect of these reports upon pictures. 

I have seen, for instance, pictures shrink from 
extreme lengths to comfortable footage. The 
reports of exhibitors, more plainly than any- 
thing else, told Hollywood that this change 
had to come. 

I have sCen the dirt go out of pictures. This 
change had been preached from the eminences 
of official filmdom, without avail. It has been 
talked of by trick writers, special writers, ex- 
perts of all kinds. It was made only when 
the exhibitors, each and every one repeating 
the comment of his neighbor, convinced Holly- 
wood that it had to be made. 

I have seen Westerns come into favor, I have 
seen the long slapsticks dwindle in importance, 
I have seen nobodies brought into sudden star- 
ship and stars reduced to immediate obscurity, 
all because the exhibitors agreed that these 
things should come to pass. Exhibitor will is 
law, inexorable, and it is expressed through 
"What the Picture Did for Me." There is no 
more vital influence in all picturedom, and no 
saner one. 



Yc 



'BUTTONS" 



OUNG Mr. (nee Master) Coogan is aided 
by Ralph Spence's captions and a trans-Atlantic 
liner in his efforts to mak« "Buttons" an in- 
triguing picture, and the thing does get inter- 
esting along toward the end. In the early 
footage, however, it drags quite drearily, and it 
doesn't amount to a whole lot altogether. 
Rather too bad, too, for it looked as though 
Jackie were going to weather the adolescent 
period nicely. 

In this venture Jackie's a page (the captions 
add "boy") aboard a liner that, you're sure 
before the picture's really got going, is to be 
wrecked at a suitable juncture. He idolizes the 
captain, and a pug who is aboard as trainer, 
and resents the captain's fiancee's intrigue with 
another member of the cast. Lots of comedy is 
mixed up with this somewhat serious central 
thread of the yam, but the wreck (it's an ice> 
berg off Southampton — where a probably sea- 
wise friend of mine says they don't thrive) 
brings everything to what oldfashioned fiction- 
ists referred to as "a pretty pass," and so to the 
merry closeup and all that. 

Not Jackie's best picture, by several, but not 
his worst either. He looks quite shipshape in 
the buttons he wears, however, and after all, 
he's Jackie. 



TO WORLD READERS TO HERALD READERS 

Service departments of MOVING PICTURE WORLD and EXHIBITORS HERALD will be found on the following pages of this issue of 
EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOVING PICTURE WORLD: 

Page 

"Selling the picture to the Public" 40 "The Theatre" 

"Through the Box Office Window" 38 "Service Talks" 

'Quick Reference Picture Chart" 45 "Available Attractions" 

"Better Projection" 29 "Better Projection" 

"Little Pictures with the Big Punch" 27 "The Short Feature" 

"Hollywood" 24 "Hollywood," by Ray Murray 

"Straight from the Shoulder Reports" 51 "What the Picture Did for Me" 

"Live News from Coast to Coast" 28 "Live News from Coast to Coast" 

"Stage and Pit" 30 "Presentation Acts" 



40 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



THE THEATRE 



Incorporated in this department of practical showmanship of Exhibitors Herald are the Moving 
Picture World departments, "Selling the Picture to the Public,^' which was established September 
23, 1911, by Epes Winthrop Sargent, and "Better Business Builders." 

A. D. Baker, Lockhart, Tex., M.B.I. No. 1 

Hats off to M. B. 1. No. 1, A. D. Baker of the Baker theatre, Lockhart, Texas.. Baker's "My Best Idea" 
was the first to reach "The Theatre" after last week's announcement of the formation of the M. B. I. cluh. For 
this reason he is entitled to the honor of being M. B. I. No. 1, but "The Theatre believes that after you have 
read Baker's "My Best Idea" you will all agree that he deserves this distinction also from the standpoint of 
the excellence of his "My Best Idea." It boosted business for him. It will for you also. 

The next "My Best Idea" will appear in a coming issuse. Watch for M. B. 1. No. 2. Will it be yours? 



66 




A. D. Baker 
M. B, I. N». 1 



'My Best Idea'' No. 1 

By A. D. Baker 

OME months ago patrons of my theatre 
I at Lockhart, Texas, were astonished to 
see a full sized skeleton hanging to one 
side of the screen on 
the stage of my thea- 
tre. A spotlight played 
on this gruesome 
exhibit. When asked 
what it was for I re- 
plied, "That's the 
great m y s t e r y." 
Nothing could in- 
duce me to give out 
more information. 

For several nights 
this skeleton hung 
in full view of the 
audience. Then one 
night a slide an- 
nounced "Bake r's 
Nerve Night — Your 
Opportunity to Show How Much Nerve 
You Possess." 

Several nights after this slide was first 
exhibited, I made a talk from the stage, 
announcing that I had decided to see how 
much nerve my patrons had. "You have 
often heard it said that such and such a 
person has a lot of 'nerve'. Now we are 
going to see who has nerve enough to come 
up and open this Mystery Box." As I 
said mystery box, it was the cue for the 
curtains to part, and reveal a large black 
box on which had been painted a skull and 
crossbones. 

I explained that this Mystery Box was 
to be opened by a patron of my theatre 
on a certain night. What was in it I 
refused to reveal, but something would be 
in it for the person with nerve enough to 
open it. 

On the advertised night the house was 
packed. The orchestra played a funereal 
march, and the curtains parted, revealing 
the Mystery Box, skull and crossbones, 
and the skeleton dangling from a cord 
nearby. The stage was dressed in black 
curtains, and all in all the view presented 
was anything but reassuring. It was almost 
ghastly! Sighs and shudders could be 
heard from all parts of the audience. 

"Who has nerve enough to pull the rope 
and see what is inside? 

"Let no one come forward unless he has 




When the Albee theatre, Booklyn, played the Pathe picture, "Dress Parade," star- 
ring William Boyd, a £ne tieup was made with the U. S. Army, and this special 
display of army equipment was used near the theatre to attract passersby. (See 
story on page 41.) 



plenty of N-E-R-V-E, and can take a joke 
with a smile," I announced from the stage. 

No one came. I talked some more. Still 
no one came. I stressed the need for 
nerve and good nature, asking no one to 
come up unless he or she could take a 
joke gracefully. 

Finally the audience began daring a cer- 
tain young man to show his nerve. He 
gingerly approached the stage. When he 
finally reached center stage I handed him 
a huge revolver and said, "Here's your 
protection, pull the string and when the 
box falls open, if it is somethine to Eat, 
EAT IT, if it is something to KISS, KISS 
it, if it is SOMETHING TO SHOOT, 
WHY SHOOT IT." 

He pulled the string. The box fell open. 
On the end of the rope or string was a 
note addressed to "The Nerviest Person 
in Town." The note said, "Please accept 
this $10 bill with compliments of The Baker 
Theatre." He was persuaded to read the 
note in a loud voice to the audience. 

When he had finished reading the note 
the audience howled with delight. Every- 
body was tickled to death, and I had pulled 
in at least a week of capacity business. 
The stunt worked so well that I announced 



another "Nerve Night," promising some- 
thing different in the box this time. 

On the second "Nerve Night" there was 
a packed house and when I called for 
volunteers a great crowd rushed to the 
stage. One woman, a good natured sort 
of person, who didn't mind a joke, reached 
the stage first. I went through all the 
hocus pocus of warning her, handed her 
the revolver and told her to "Pull." On 
the end of the string was one old, tattered 
woman's stocking. The audience screamed 
and howled again with even more delight 
than on the first night. The woman took 
the joke gracefully, and I had packed 'em 
in again. 

In order to keep from hurting anyone's 
feelings I had planted a man behind the 
curtains to substitute a valuable gift in 
place of the old stocking, in the event some 
prominent or dignified woman reached the 
stage first. But as it happened the woman 
who did reach the stage didn't mind the 
burlesque at her expense, and everything 
went off happily. This was one of the most 
talked of stunts, the cheapest and perhaps 
the best box office draw I ever used, and 
I have used many of them. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



41 



Albee Theatre Ties 
Up With Army for 
''Dress Parade ^'Run 

Pathe's picture, "Dress Parade," starring 
William Boyd, offers many good exploita- 
tion angles, and fine advantage was made 
of them by the Albee theatre, Brooklyn, 
when it ran the picture recently. 

Trailers, heralds, 24-sheets, 3-sheets, and 
1-sheets were used as advance advertising. 
Cutouts, art posters and special art panels 
were used in the lobby. The theatre lobby 
and marquee were attractively decorated 
in bunting and flags. Advance newspaper 
stories and illustrations were obtained. 

But the outstanding feature of the exploi- 
tation campaign was a tieup effected with 
the recruiting section of the Army's Second 
Corps Area located at Governors Island. 
Permission was obtained from the Transit 
commission, the Highway Commissioner 
of Brooklyn and the Interborough Rapid 
Transit company for the erection of a 
wooden platform, 40 feet long, 18 feet wide, 
and 50 inches high, over a subway ventila- 
tor in Albee Square. This location is in 
the heart of downtown Brooklyn and lies 
between the Albee theatre and the largest 
department store. 

Through the commandants of Forts Tot- 
ten and Hamilton, the largest searchlights 
the Army has, and the largest device for 
detecting the approach of enemy aeroplanes 
were obtained and these were placed on the 
platform mentioned above. The Army fur- 
nished two crews of soldiers to man the 
equipment. 

Banners 40 feet long were placed on two 
sides of the platform, extending to the 
ground, and two others, 18 feet long, were 
placed on the other two sides. These read, 
"See William Boyd in 'Dress Parade' at the 
Albee." 

The ray of the searchlight could be seen 
at a distance of 30 miles, and thousands of 
persons on their way home from business 
were attracted to the display. Just as day- 
light disappeared the crews went into ac- 
tion and entertained the crowds by man- 
ning the equipment and explaining the 
workings of the light, the listening device 
and the generator trucks which fed the 
equipment with power. 

Thousands of people who passed by 
overhead in the elevated trains, and per- 
sons on their way to various subway sta- 
tions and department stores in the vicinity 
were attracted to this display which proved 
to be an excellent medium of exploiting the 
picture. 

Of course such an exploitation is impos- 
sible in small towns, but there are few 
towns that do not have some sort of mili- 
tary organization with which a tieup can 
be made on "Dress Parade." The Legion, 
the National Guard company and Boy 
Scouts are a few of the organizations that 
can help you put over the picture. If there 
is a graduate of West Point in your town 
get a story from him for the papers, and 
send him a special invitation to see the 
picture. You can get an advance story 
from him about his experience at West 
Point, and then another about what he 
thought of the picture. 

When the picture played at the Palace- 
Orpheum theatre in Milwaukee, the attendance 
of General Charles King, said to be the oldest 
living graduate of West Point, was the high- 
light of the engagement. At every show the 
U. S. Army had two sentries stationed in 
front of the theatre and gave further coopera- 
tion through the posting of SO recruiting 
"Dress Parade" one-sheets. 




MARK—. 



Wir€4Uwn Jtan&t{, Grmpami of Qmcrita 





RENm 
RESSINC 

-^ilh lOIS WILSON, (LIVE BROOK 
IILYANTASHNAN w H.B.WARNER 



/ ^^°^^T8;xpr<.SS<?d .n Rich OiftS 
of HOLIDAY ScPGon Art, Festive Music and 
YULETIDE Noveltius Including _ _ 

HARVARD COLLEGIANS 

MARVELOUS ENTERTAINING ORCHESTRA 
MARK STRAND OXiQ.WZ^'\Tik.WilhjS(M,conduc(or 



Bffflinninq Next Saturday. Oecember 31 
)_J .J.- lie An -. 



•soWIll&son 

Ohs Picture Millions wiO 
Acclaim ag a Mastorpiec? 

Special Hqw 'jeans fvc Perfo. 



,t Saturday. UecemDer 

the NEW yEAR ujjth a^dJOCE/S SHOW. 



ART KAHN.'thVfJoilickrfiq 

Ruthmic Master orCsrsmomes 
*;th HIS OfJCHESTRA and 

Talc?ntod Enter fa m(?P5 

Sfar/inj dt 10 30PM. 




//ahorate Sfagp Shotu Pi-esc-nfafjons ttj Edward L Htjmaii 

I "CARNIYAL Of VENICE- f*"ED H™^r™^D_oi^™^ 

CAELoniiRETil'CAESXSNEa -THEY CALL IT DANCINGl" 

RESTWO, T/lMDOljEIHE OIBIS wilAVALi end STEWART.. 

and SEKOVA DANCERS VERONICA 

DONWIUlABS,^f/»;A>«,J? SEEOVA DAHCEES 



COMING. That HollicMng Rulhmic Master of fpTenionies 
ART KAHN... C?/i<p ^'dtt'tfnn of ftusic 

and ffiS TWENTY TAIENTED. TIRELESS MUSICIANS 



Rarely does one run across such 
beautiful hand lettering as in these 
three, two-column ads from the 
Brooklyn Mark-Strand theatre. Every 
letter in each of the ads is hand let- 
tered and together they make a pleas- 
ing whole, and demonstrate bow 
much more effecive hand lettering is 
than type in such ads, but in spite of 
the £ne lettering and layout, each ad 
carries too much information. Notice 
how the theatre name is varied in 
layout. Here the gray "S" proves 
more effective than the black one for 
the emphasis is thrown on the name 
of the picture rather than the design 
as is the case of the ad with the 
black "S." 



Have You Sent in 
Your ''My Best Idea;'' 
M. B. L Club Scores 

Already "The Theatre's" M. B. I. club has 
won the approval of exhibitors. A number of 
letters have come in praising the new club 
and containing "My Best Ideas." 

If you failed to see last week's announce- 
ment of the M. B. I. club, get your last week's 
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World and acquaint yourself with this new 
feature of "The Theatre." 

The M. B. I. club has been started to give 
exhibitors new and money-making exploitation 
plans. It can be successful only if you send in 
your "My Best Ideas," so get out your lead 
pencil and a piece of paper and jot down your 
"My Best Idea," and send it in. Just relate 
it like you would if you were talking to an- 
other exhibitor when you are talking over the 
stunts you have pulled. 



Check Your Advertising 

At about this time the wise theatre manager 
is doping out his advertising and exploitation 
campaigns for the coming season. He knows 
that the next few months are wonderful busi- 
ness months. He knows that his theatre is 
booked with a wonderful array of attractions. 
And he's determined to get all the business 
possible out of his community. Big campaigns 
are about to pop, no doubt. 

But first let us each do a bit of careful 
checking of advertising media and expendi- 
tures. 

CHECK YOUR NEWSPAPER ADVER- 
TISING. Perhaps, with a bit more care in 
laying out copy, or better understanding bef- 
tween yourself and the display compositor, 
you may be able to put across a better sales 
argument in smaller space than you are now 
buying. 

CHECK YOUR BILL POSTING. Maybe 
you're not getting the class distribution you 
think you are. Maybe some of your locations 
have deteriorated in value and can be cut out 
without hurting business. That would make 
for a definite saving in purchasing accessories 
as well as in the cost of posting. 

CHECK YOUR SCREEN ANNOUNCE- 
MENTS. Are trailers always received on time 
for proper showing? If not, why not? Do you 
use slides on special productions and events? 
Do you make them up with care? And do 
you attach sufficient importance to them when 
laying out your show schedule? 

CHECK YOUR LOBBY DISPLAY. Are 
you using the sort of posters, stills, lithos, in- 
serts or art panels most appropriate to your 
theatre and patronage? Are you buying this 
stuflf as economically as you can? 

CHECK YOUR PRINTED PROGRAM. 
Are you getting as much as possible for ad 
space in programs? Have you as many ad- 
vertisers as you can get? Can't youi improve 
the program typographically? If you did, it 
would be a better general advertising mes^ 
senger for your theatre, and would become a 
more attractive medium for the prospective 
advertiser to purchase space in. 

CHECK YOUR BALLYHOO, STUNT 
AND THROWAWAY ADVERTISE- 
MENTS. In each case be sure before you go 
ahead that the possible box office results will 
justify the necessary expenditure. 

(Reprinted from "The Live Wire" Schine 
Enterprises, Inc.) 



42 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



Contest to Determine Origin of 
"7th Heaven Phrase Fills House 

An exploitation stunt that reached far beyond expectations and which inter- 
ested practically the entire population of Ames, la., was recently brought to a 
triumphant conclusion during the showing of "Seventh Heaven" at the Capitol 
theatre in that town. The stunt can easily be used by any theatre in the country 
with similar results. 



Joe Gebracht, manager of the Capitol, 
launched the contest in order to interest 
patrons in the name of the picture and, as 
a natural follow, in the film itself. Results 
were perfectly satisfactory and capacity 
houses witnessed the showings. 

The question put to the public was, "Where 
did the phrase, 'Seventh Heaven' originate 
and what does it mean?" A prize of $5 was 
offered by the management for the most com- 
prehensive answer and the Ames Tribune, 
through which the contest was sponsored, 
gave a pair of season tickets. 

The stunt involved, not only the submerged 
third, intellectually speaking, who were purely 
curious about it all, but also the high-ibrow 
element who didn't want to be weighed in the 
balance and found wanting should some in- 
quisitive person appeal to their literary and 



BOYS! GIRLS 

JOIN OUB GANG CLUB 

Free Membership Buttons Given at First Meeting 
SATURDAY, JANUARY Jth, 2:30 P. M. 

Lots Of Fun 



Fne Canty to ike KJJ*I 



Fnt Clout, to the KLls! 



Bring Your Friends-Maywood Theatre-Admission 10c 



Herald used by the Maywood theatre, 
Maywood, a suburb of Chicago, to 
announce the beginning of its "Our 
Gang" club. These clubs are prov- 
ing very successful in increasing the 
patronage of children and many thea- 
tres are now organizing them. The 
idea was originated by Charles Ryan 
of the Buckingham theatre, Chicago, 
and a full story on this club was car- 
ried in the Nov. 12 issue of the 
former "Exhibitors Herald." 



historical 
mystery. 

The idea, made 



backgrounds to help solve the 
public by a front page 



story, made an instant appeal. The library 
was besieged. Teachers, club women and 
church groups vied with each other in verify- 
ing the origin of the high sounding title. 

Some had a vague idea that the words were 
quoted from Shakespeare and other were cer- 
tain that the Bible held the secret. Some 
accused Sherwood Anderson, and even 
Mohammed was brought into the discussion 
as a possible source. Literature of all sorts 
was examined for a clue. 

The elusive phrase set hundreds of brain- 
waves in motion until there was a veritable 
typhoon of research enthusiasm sweeping the 
mid-west college town. 

Several club women, in talking with Geb- 
racht, declared that, although they had not 
entered the contest, they were having a pretty 
good time chasing the intriguing title to its 
lair. Literature classes argued and history 
classes thumbed their texts but it was students 
of the Bible who finally walked off with the 
honors. 

Too many times excellent pictures with 
vague or apparently meaningless titles have 
taken heavy toll from the box ofifice receipts 
in the small towns. A good deal of explana- 
tion has been necessary oftentimes to put 
over splendid examples of cinema art because 
there was nothing in the experience of the 
average patron which reacted to the words 
of the titles. Take for instance, "If Winter 
Conies," "Beau Geste" and "Mare Nostrum." 
It is safe to wager that less than 40 per cent 
of regular patrons were familiar with the 
sources of such titles. The rest of the 60 
per cent had to be educated up to the titles 
if the runs spelled dollars. 

In this case however, the management had, 
not only the advantage of an excellent picture 
with which to satisfy the appetites of the 
patrons after sufficiently whetting them in 
the unique contest, but, in addition, it had 
the attention of the better class of patrons 
whose confidence in the theatre was aug- 
mented after they had seen the noted film. 
And again, the church element had a hand 
in solving the problem set up in the contest, 
and any manager knows how valuable an 
asset that can be, especially in certain 
localities. 



A. D. Baker, who becomes M. B. I. 
No. 1, opened the £rst moving pic- 
ture theatre in Lockhart, Texas, 
years ago, and has operated the Baker 
theatre there ever since. By such 
good exploitations as the one printed 
here, which he regards as his "My 
Best Idea," he has kept all competi- 
tion out of his town and has made his 
theatre a paying proposition year in 
and year out. The story of another 
of Baker's stunts was printed in the 
August 13, 1927, issue of the former 
"Exhibitors Herald." 



Clergy Sees "Ben Hur'' 

When C. W. Miller, manager of the Hippo- 
drome theatre, Youngstown, Ohio, played 
"Ben Hur," the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer spe- 
cial, he held a special Saturday morning mati- 
nee for clergymen, officials and teachers of 
the public schools and newspapermen. Also 
sisters from a local nunnery saw the picture 
at this time. The matinee was a big success 
and one preacher delivered a sermon on the 
picture, declaring that the picture "is one of 
the best sermons ever delivered." 



1927 


SHOWS 
7:30-9:00 


DECEMBER 


ATKINSON 
NEBRASKA 


1927 








KIHC rELTON. J- 






















«l.S.ll5fcn.n, 










^' ^"NAlicHTY BUT N 


CE" 


life 




1^11 













"I find this monthly calendar a good 
way to advertise," says A. G. Miller 
of the Lyric theatre, Atkinson, Neb. 
"I use my own copy and get 1,000 
printed in two color work for $9. By 
putting prices under each picture my 
patrons know how much the show is 
going to cost before hand." 



flic 



VARCONI 




All this advertising costs the city of Chicago not one penny, since it is used by Pathe to tell Broadwayites that "Chicago,' the 
Pathe special, starring Phyllis Haver and Victor Varconi, is running at the Gaiety theatre. Pathe's "Chicago" is the film interpre- 
tation of the stage play by the same name that had such a successful run in New York and other cities. 



January 14, 1928 EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



NEW PICTURES 



In "New Pictures" the EXHIBITORS HERALD and 
MOVING PICTURE WORLD presents in concise form 
information on current and forthcoming attractions. 

The facts as presented will serve exhibitors in booking 
and in the preparation of their advertising campaigns. 

ADVENTURER, THE: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer drama, with Tim McCoy. Dorothy 
Sebastian, Charles Delaney, George Cowl, Michael Visaroff, Gayne Whitman, 
Alex Melesh, and Katherine Block. Direted by Viachetslav Tourjansky. Re- 
leased December 10. Length 4,709. 

TYPE AND THEME: An adventure story of a South American revolution. 
McCoy manages an American^ovmed mine in Costa Ora. When a revolution 
headed by Rafael threatens de SUva's gomernment, McCoy rescues his daughter, 
Dolores, and takes her to his mine headquarters. His feigned friendliness toward 
the rebels deceives Dolores, and hearing that her father's life depends on her 
presence at the palace, she runs away. At the palace she finds Rafael in 
power. McCoy follo^us and succeeds in replacing the rebel troops with federal 
soldiers. As the federal troops are to begin an attack, he sees Rafael escaping 
with Dolores. A strenuous and perilous chase through the mountains results 
in Rafael's death and Dolores' rescue. 

ADVENTURE MAD: Paramount-UFA drama, with Eric Barclay, Lillian Hall- 
Davis, Nils Asther, Nina Vanna, Albert Steinnick, Paul Graetz. Directed by 

Lothar Mendes. Released Length 

TYPE AND THEME: The cast, with the exception of Asther, is not known 
in this country, but Director Mendes has made ttoo American pictures. The 
tale concerns a wealthy Englishman who wants adventure. A collector of 
clocks, he mysteriously receives one with a message telling him to listen to 
the number of times the cuckoo cries and he icill thus be led to a buried 
treasure in Cairo, Egypt. He acts accordingly and after following the cuckoo 
cries through a number of adventures, he locates the treasure, which turns out 
to be alligators. He is cured of his adventure madness. 

DESERT OF THE LOST, THE: Pathe Western, with Wally Wales, Peggy 
Montgomery, William J. Dyer, Edward Cecil, Richard Neill, Kelly Gafford, Ray 
Murro, George Magrill, and Charles Whitaker. Directed by Richard Thorpe. 
Released December 18. Length 4.933. 

TYPE AND THEME: Wales is a Montana cowboy in this one, but has to 
leave the state because of being unable to prove that in killing a man, he did 
so in self-defense. He lands in Mexico, where he is befriended by Dolores, 
daughter of a renegade American, who is trying to marry her to a Chinese 
bandit because of his secret gold mine. Jim defends the girl and in escaping 
from a trap set for him by her father, captures the bandit gang and finds the 
gold mine. A man following him whom he had thought a detective proves to 
be a friend trying to tell him that the charges against him in Montana have 
been lifted. 

FASHION MADNESS: Columbia drama, with Claire Windsor, Reed Howes, 
Laska Winter, Donald McNamee, and William E. Tooker. Directed by Louis J. 

Gasnier. Released Length . 

TYPE AND THEME: In which a young man goes to a lot of trouble to 
make a woma/n out of the frivolous girl he loves. Aroused by her insinuations 
regarding Tanaka, daughter of his guide at his hunting lodge, he refuses to 
let Gloria, off his yacht and takes her to the lodge. There the two women are 
contrasted. One day Vic returns to rescue them from a threatening forest fire, 
and Gloria, fearing his steps are Tanaka's, shoots through the window, wounding 
Vic, The women start with Vic on a sled to the settlement. Tanaka falls 
over a cliff, and to save Vic, cuts herself loose and falls to her death. Gloria 
carries on successfully, coming out of the ordeal a serious woman. 

HERO FOR A NIGHT, A: Universal comedy-drama, with Glenn Tryon, Patsy 
Ruth Miller, Lloyd iWhitlock, Burr Mcintosh, Bob Milash, Ruth Dwyer, and 
Bobby. Directed by William J. Craft. Rieleased December 12. Length, 5,711. 

TYPE AND THEME: This one's almost slapstick, so the drama part of the 
elassifieation is only formal. Hiram, resident of an Eastern summer resort, 
builds a plane and takes a. correspondence course in flying, in order to enter 
am air race in Europe. Sloan, head of a sha/ving cream company, his daughter 
Mary, and Sloan's secretary and nurse arrive. The latter two are after SU>an's 
money. Hiram falls for Mary but receives no encouragement. He, however, 
is undaunted and forces himself into Sloan's pa/rty for a French aiviator. Then 
Mary learns of the intrigue against her father. She tells Hiram and they get 
Sloan into the plane and start for New York. They end up in Russia, which 
is a great aid to the happiness of everybody. 

LAND OF THE LAWLESS: Pathe Western, with Jack Padjan, Tom Santschi, 
Joseph W. Rickson, Charles Clary, Vivian Winston, Frank Clark, Duke R. Lee, 
and Otto Fries. Directed by Thomas Buckingham. Released December 25. 
Length 4,131. 

TYPE AND THEME: Fadoan's first Western as a star, made under the 
direction of Thomas Buckingham, former Tom Mix director. Padjan wins a 
. job with Kelter, gamg leader, by a cut of the cards and soon thereafter falls in 
love ivith Polly, whom. Kelter also loves. Nettled by Padjan's interference, 
Kelter has him made captive, then starts terrorizing Polly's household. Padjan 
escapes and rescues Polly for himself. 

LITTLE BUCKAROO, THE: FBO Western, with Buzz Barton, Melbourn 
Morante, Kenneth McDonald, Peggy Shaw, Al Ferguson, Walter Maley, Robert 
Bums, Florence D. Lee, and James Welch. Directed by Louis King. Released 

Length...- _ 

TYPE AND THEME: Barton, the hard-riding juvenile, aids in the capture 
of bandits in this one. As Red Hepner, he and his friend Toby find Crawford, 
a prospector, dead in the desert, vnth a note asking the finders to care for 
his daughter, who is in school in the East. Going to an inn to meet their friend 
Pemberton, they save Ann Crawford on the way during a stage holdup. Pember- 
ton marries the girl to save her from ruffians. Then Red and Toby ride the stage 
coach to confirm their suspicions that the opener is responsible for the robberies. 
After perilous procedure they capture the gang and bring them to town just 



as Pemberton is about to be lynched as the bandit leader. The captives name- 
the stage owner as the culprit, whereupon Ann holds Pemberton to his marriage 
contract. 

ON YOUR TOES: Universal comedy-drama, with Reginald Denny, Barbara 
Worth, Hayden Stevenson, Frank Hagney, Mary Carr, Gertrude Howard, and 
George West. Directed by Fred Newmeyer. Efeleased November 27. Length 
5,918. 

TYPE AND THEME: Denny has the type of role he likes in this one, being, 
at least eventually, a fighter. And there's a ring battle for a finish thrill. 
Sullivan, fight manager, is insulted by the champion and vows to get a man 
to defeat him. Going with his daughter, Mary, to the home of former cham- 
pion Evans, he finds Evans' son a sissy. But Mary falls for him and Young 
Evans goes to New York with them and opens a dancing school. Mary gets 
him to be a taxi driver, and getting into a fight with a pugilist, Evans knocks 
him out. He turns fighter and ultimately maJces everyone happy by licking the 
champion. 

SALLY IN OUR ALLEY: Columbia drama, with Shirley Mason, Richard Arlen, 
Alec B. Francis, Paul Panzer, William H. Strauss, Kathlyn Williams, Florence 
Turner, and Harry Crocker. Directed by Walter Lang. Released September 3. 
Length 5,892. 

TYPE AND THEME: A poor girl goes to live with her rich aunt — and a 
title made famous by the song. Sally is the daughter of a woman who had 
been cut off by her parents for marrying a poor man. They live in a 
New York tenement, taking in washing. One day Sally returns home to find 
her mother dead. But her mother had written to a rich sister, who takes Sally 
to her home. Sally's lover, Jimmie, is told to stay away, which increases 
Sally's hate for the snobbish rich. Leaving her aunt, she learns that Jimmie 
is sailing for China and rushes to the pier, arriving just as the boat pulls out. 
Jimmie, however, had decided to stay near Sally, stepping from concealment 
to take Sally in his arms. 

SERENADE: Paramount drama, with Adolphe Menjou, Kathryn Carver, Lawrence 
Grant, Lina Basquette, Martha Franklin. Directed by Harry D'Abbadie 
D'Arrast. Released December 24. Length 5,209. 

TYPE AND THEME: Their dying love is reanimated by the sound of his 
love song, which she had inspired. Rossi, Viennese musician, has not composed 
a single hit until he meets Gretchen. With her as inspiration, he soon becomes 
famous and they marry. Then he tires of her, being enamoured of a ballerina 
at the opera where he conducts. Gretchen is heartbroken and leavs him, 
throwing Rossi into a fit of remorse, for he realizes that he still loves her. 
Tracing her to a room in a cafe one night, he implores her to return to him, 
but she is adamant. The sound of the song she inspired, however, wins her 
assent. 

THAT'S MY DADDY: Universal comedy-drama, with Reginald De«iny, Barbara 
Kent, Lillian Rich, Tom O'Brien, Armand Kaliz, Jane La Verne, Mathilde 

Brundage and others. Directed by Fred Newmeyer. Released . 

Length 

TYPE AND THEME: A typical Denny vehicle, exploiting the "regular guy" 
that is liked so well in our country. He is supposed to marry a society girl, 
whom he doesn't care for at all. But a motorcycle cop leads him to better 
things by believing his alibi that he was rushing to his daughter in a hospital. 
There Jimmy makes good his bluff by taking home an orphan girl, who just 
before the scheduled wedding, cries "Daddy" to him, thereby shooing off his 
fiancee. Jimmy celebrates his loss by marrying the little girl's nurse. 

WIZARD, THE: Fox mystery-drama, with Edmund Lowe, Leila Hyams, Giistav 
von Seyffertitz, E. H. Galvert, Norman Trevor, Barry Norton, Oscar Smith, 
Perle Marshall, Richard Frazier, George Kotsonaros and Maude Turner Gordon. 
Directed by Richard Slosson. Released December 11. Length 5,629. 

TYPE AND THEME: Adapted from Gaston Leroux's "Balaoo," this one 
develops sinister proceedings with the aid of an actor in ape's clothing. A 
scientist, Coriolis, had suffered the death of his son in the electric chair, and 
to avenge him upon the judge and former district attorney, has trained an 
ape to work his will. At a birthday party given by Judge Webster for his 
daughter, Anne, to which his friends, the attorney and the scientist are invited, 
the mysterious business commences. A newspaper reporter, Gordon, after both 
judge and attorney have strangely disappeared, goes to Anne's room and dis- 
covers the ape. He kills_ the beast, and for that or some other reason, reaches 
a sentimental understanding with Anne. 



Your Classified Ad 
Will Do the Work! 

Exhibitors Herald has helped hundreds of Theatre owners 
in solving many a problem. The classified advertising de- 
partment has placed organists all over the country, has 
helped in obtaining equipment, in selling equipment, and in 
solving many another problem that seemed difficult. The 
rates are but 5c per word. See this week's classified page. 
Maybe you are in need of something that is being adver- 
tised this week. The cost is small, the results are great. 



44 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



PRESS SHEETS 



CALL OF THE HEART, THE (Universal: In 
parts of the country where dogs are used for pulling 
sleds in the winter, a mush race might be a novel 
way of exploiting this picture. If there ie no snow, 
have the dogs pull coaster wagons. A good topic for 
a newspaper essay contest would be "Why the dog 
is man's best friend," calling attention to Balto, the 
Alaskan dog that won international fame a few years 
ago by leading the team that transported antitoxin 
serum. In many towns there are dogs that everyone 
knows of because of some special characteristic or 
deed of service. Sponsor a contest and award prizes 
for the best essays on local dog heroes. It should 
not be difficult to arouse interest in such a proposi- 
tion. 

COHENS AND KELLYS IN PARIS, THE (Uni- 
versal) : Free passes might be given away to those 
whose names are Cohen or Kelly. Print these in 
your daily advertisements with the announcement 
that if the parties so named will present the ad at 
the box office they will be admitted free. A stage 
presentation could be vised in the form of an Apache 
dance. Newspaper contests on the following topics 
could be run : "Why I Would Like to Live in 
Paris," "What I Did When I Visited Paris with the 
A. E. F." or "The History of the Eiffel Tower." 
Teasers and throwaways with these titles may be 
printed: "A Wife and an Artist's Model," "Paris 
Secrets," "G'est La Vie," "When in Paris," etc. 
You might address a letter to "Mr. Kelly or Mr. 
Cohen," and if the poet office catches on and de- 
livers the envelope to you, the story should get a 
break in the papers. 

FASHION MADNESS (Columbia) : The always 
interesting fashion show, exhibit, review, or what- 
ever you want to call it, should be used with a pic- 
ture like this whenever possible. Merchants will be 
glad to co-operate on this, and it is sure to help 
the fashion shops and also the box office. Arrange 
with a fashion shop for a series of window displays 
on the methods used to obtain the material used in 
making women's clothes. A stage setting for the 
picture can represent a huge fashion book from 
which couples dressed in different period styles, can 
emerge and do a dance that is characteristic of 
the time. 

FOURFUSHER, THE (Universal): This title 
suggests some good ideas for newspaper contests. 
The following are examples : "The Greatest Four- 
flusher I Ever Knew," "Why It Doesn't Pay to Be a 
Fourflusher," and "'The Time I Was a Fourflusher." 
Copy for throwaways can read "Only a fourflusher 
will fail to get a kick out of 'The Fourflusher.' 
That's why you are requested to attend the 

_ theatre, (dates)," 

"Don't be a fourflusher. Come to the 

theatre, _ _ (dates) and find out why," 

"It's a shame the way fourflushers get away with 

murder. The fourflusher at the _ theatre 

lands a girl, a bank roll and a Rolls-Royce," "An 
ounce of fourflushing may be worth a ton of hard 
work. If you don't believe this see 'The Fourflusher' 

at the theatre You'll be 

surprised !" 

HAM AND EGGS AT THE FRONT (Warner 
Bros.) : A new suggestion in this press sheet is this : 
Supply the largest laundry in town with laundry 
shirt cardboards, with your advertisement printed on 
them ; or, get their permission to have the copy 
printed on the cardboard used regularly by them. 
Put a stretcher near the box office with this notice 
placed over it, "Placed here for the convenience of 
our patrons who laugh themselves sick at 'Ham and 
Eggs at the Front.' " Perhaps some restaurant 
would be glad to co-operate with you in exploiting 
this picture with the idea of "ham and eggs." A 
colored jazz band would make a good stage act. 
The local Armour Company office may donate a 
"ham what am" to patrons holding lucky numbers. 

LEGIONNAIRES IN PARIS (F B O) : Get Ameri- 
can Legion tieups on this "dough" boy of comedies. 
Actual shots of the American Legion Convention in 
Paris are used in the picture. Have a special Legion 
Night, and if you wish, work it as a benefit show. 
Try to pull off a special Parisian dance act before 
each performance, and if possible get a Legion man 
to act as master of ceremonies, having him tell of 
some of his experiences during his second trip to 
France. Tieup with a newspaper and a shoe store, 
ranning a contest to find out who has the biggest 
feet in town, and then have the shoe store donate a 



pair of shoes to the winner. If practical, get the 
town band to play at the evening performances ; and 
whatever you do don't spoil the show by not having 
the proper type of music for it. 

NO PLACE TO GO (First National) : "Has Mod- 
ern, Jazz-Mad Youth 'No Place to Go'?" and "Why 
the thea/tje is the BEST place to go any- 

time," are two ideas for newspaper contests. The 
following copy might be used in teasers, or in your 
regular ads: "Where you ain't. 'Romance is some- 
thing which happens where you ain't,' Artemus Ward 
once opined, and it is this theme which is demon- 
strated in a very delightful fashion in 'No Place to 
Go,' a First National comedy-drama starring Mary 
Astor and Lloyd Hughes, that is now playing at the 

theatre." For tieup with sporting goods 

stores selling golf outfits, clubs, etc., prepare the fol- 
lowing "See what happens to a golfer when he is 
marooned on a cannibal island with nothing to do 
but practice golf strokes." 

OUTCASn SOULS (Sterling): Tieup with the 
Salvation Army, or with any aid society, in admitting 
free all those sanctioned by the society as being 
too poor to get entertainment. Run this fact in all 
your ads and in as many other ways as possible. 
Teasers can read, "Is Old Age Coming on? Don't 
Be an Outcast Soul. Wouldn't you enjoy seeing the 
show by that name?" "Do Children Forget?" etc. 
Tieup with the shoe repairers with the copy, "If you 
have any 'Outcast Soles' we will repair them better 
than anyone else." For tieups with other merchants 
use the copy, "Are Your Parents 'Outcast Souls?' 
Perhaps you are not thoughtful enough of them. 

Buy them a (article) and then take them 

to see OUTCAST SOULS which is now playing at 

the -theatre." Get some of the youngsters 

who have "scooters" to hang signs advertising the 
film on their backs. This would be inexpensive and 
would attract attention in a different manner. 

RAWHIDE KID, THE (Universal) : "Because 
there's a laugh sequence of a Jewish peddler drawing 
a gun and forcing the cowboys to buy his entire stock 



!P4R4M0llNTPl(T0RIAl 

^ Qlai'lie's fnmOfeut (ariuiuiiparamuunl'j'tdiJ^i <^ ^ 

GENTLEMEN &>REEER 6LIINDE$ 




Have you seen one of these before? It is 
a 12" X 18" "flash" used by Paramount to 
herald pictures that are in production. 
On the other side of the sheet the rest 
of the cast is described. 



of clothing, pans, toilet articles, etc., in this picture, 
perhaps a local women's club would welcome the 
opportunity to hold a rummage sale in your lobby," 
says the press sheet. Or, arrange a special "Hoot 
Gibson Day" ; or give away gilded horse shoes to the 
first one hundred boys in line, at a certain perfor- 
mance that has been advertised. Get the bank to 
display a cowboy hat full of pennies, announcing a 
guessing contest, the one guessing nearest the cor- 
rect number of pennies, to be given so much to start 
an account with. Sponsor a horse race; or a contest 
to see who can make the most words from the letters 
in Hoot Gibson's name. 

RED RIDERS OF CANADA (F B O) : Put the 

famous slogan of the Northwest Mounted of Canada 
to work for you, for example: An amusing newspai)er 
cqntest that should guarantee attention is an essay 
competition for men or women on "How Did Your 
Wife, 'Get Her Man'?" Tack cards can read: "Red 
Lips. Red Blood. Red Coats. See Patsy Ruth Miller 
in "The Red Riders of Canada' now playing at the 

— theatre." A window tieup for a railroad 

company can carry this copy: "Tour the Canadian 
Northwest. "You'll want to, after seeing the mag- 
nificent scenery in 'Red Riders of Canada'." A very 
appropriate and instructive feature story can be run 
in the local papers previous to the showing of the 
picture. This can be a short history of the Royal 
Northwest Mounted or some true stories of their 
ability and daring. 

SAILORS' WIVES (First National) : The best copy 
presented for advertising this film is the following: 
"SUPPOSE YOU WERE GOING BLIND IN A 
MONTH ? Suppose you were a wealthy girl, — mem- 
ber of the smart set — ^beautiful — clever. Suppose you 
were suddenly told that you had only one month left 
before your eyes were forever to be darkened by total 
blindness? WHAT WOULD YOU DO? Would yon 
calmly resign yourself to your fate and watch the 
days slip through your fingers imtil you passed into 
eternal night — OR would you uproot yourself from 
everything that bound you to your old life, fling dis- 
cretion to the winds and try to cram into your last 
hours a lifetime of frenzied gaiety? This is the 
powerful theme of Sailors' Wives, a First National 
picture, with Mary Astor and Lloyd Hughes, that is 
now playing at tha _ theatre." 

SAN FRANCISCO NIGHTS (Gotham) : This press 
sheet has the following to say about exploitation: 
"Exploitation does not necessarily mean 'stunt' ad- 
vertising. Sometimes in a particular community such 
methods have a reverse action. They keep the people 
away. It is up to the individual showman to know 
his patronage and how best to appeal to them in such 
a way that they will respond. Advance stories tied 
up with the proper amount of advertising, plus the 
adequate use of posters, photographs, heralds, etc, 
will often turn the trick of a box office sell out as 
well as some sensational stunt that merely brings a 
smile but that does not sell any tickets." A sugges- 
tion for a newspaper contest is the question, "How 
did a certain section of San Francisco get the title 
of 'Barbary Coast' ?" This is the locale for the 
picture. 

SIREN, THE (Columbia) : Place over the marquee 
some rocks and the figure of a mermaid painted on 
canvas or compo-board with this inscription, "The 
sirens of old lured sailors to destruction on the rocks. 
See how the modern siren works, at this theatre 

- ." A mock trial might be staged before 

each performance, by debating clubs or high school 
students. Print "The Siren" on regular playing cards 
and distribute them with the announpement that the 
person bringing in five of them will be admitted 
free, and the person holding the highest hand will 
be given a prize. 

WAGON SHOW (First National) : Here is a little 
stunt that is worth a try. Put a peanut in an en- 
velope marked in large letters "ONE PEANUT," and 
also inclose a small slip reading: "One peanut 
doesn't make a circus I If you want to see a real 

circus, come to the now and see 'The 

Wagon Show,' starring Ken Maynard." Tieup with 
an automobile sales agency and use this copy: "After 
you've seen 'The Wagon Show' come in and see our 
Auto Show at 15 Main St.," etc. For those who 
dress their ushers in different costumes according to 
the type of picture, domino or clown suits can be 
used. A lot of clever fake stuff for the lobby can be 
worked up as a "wild animal" exhibit. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



45 



QUICK REFERENCE PICTURE CHART 



Incorporated in this department of Moving Picture World is the Exhibitors Herald department, 

"Available Attractions." 



The key to abbreviations used in denoting the type of picture; 
C — Comedy F — Farce 
D — Drama M — Melodrama 

R — Romance If — Western 

My^Mystery 

Where the picture is a comedy-drama, comedy melo- 
drama, etc., there is a combination of these abbreviations. 
Stars denote reissues. 

The dates prior to January 7 published under the 
"Review" column are those of the issues of Moving Pic- 
ture World in which the pictures were reviewed. The 
January 7 and subsequent dates are those of the issues of 
EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE 
WORLD in which "Service Talks" have been published 
on pictures. 

The dates prior to January 7 published under the "New 
Pictures" column are those of the issues of EXHIBIT- 
ORS HERALD in which "New Pictures" information was 
printed. The January 7 and subsequent dates are those of 
the issues of EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING 
PICTURE WORLD in which this information will be 
printed. 



Title 



Players 



New 

Lengrth Released Pictures 



Reviews 



Columbia 



1927 

Alias the Lone 

Wolf (D) Lytell-Wilson 

Blood Ship, The (M) Bosworth-Logan 

By Whose Hand? 

(MyD) Cortez-Gilbert 

College Hero, The (CD)..Agnew-Garon 

Isle of Forgotten 

Women (D) Tearle-D. Sebastian. 

Lone Wolf Returns (M).. Lytell-Wilson 

Opening Night, The (D)..WindBor-J. Bowers 
Pleasure Before Business 

(F) -Davidson 

Sally in Our Alley (M) Mason-Allen — 

Screen Snapshots 

Stage Kisses (D) Harlan-Chadwick 

Stolen Pleasures (CD)....Revier 

Sweet Rosie O'Grady 

(CD) Mason 



1927 



.5831. 
..6843. 



.5432. 
..5628. 



.5750 



5569 

5892 

1000 
.5435. 
. 5054 



Tigress, The (M) Holt-Revier 5357 

Wandering Girls (CD)....Revier-Agnew 5426 

Warning, The (M) _...Holt-Revier 5791 



Aug. 22 Jan. 


7 


Oct. 


Aug. 10 Dec. 


3 


.July 


Sept. 15....Dee. 
Oct. 9 


31 




Sept. 27..-Dec. 


3 


.July 


Nov. 14 




May 


Sept. 3 






Nov. 2 Jan. 


7 








Oct. 


Oct. 21 






Nov. 26 ....Dee. 


3 





1927 

Real Charleston 

Angelas, The (D) 

Wooden Shoes 



1927 

Husbands or Lovers.. 



Cranfield & Clarke, Inc. 



.Lesson Novelty 2000 . 

2000 . 

. International — . 



1927 
_Apr. 24 
..May 15 
....May 8 



Emblem Films 



.Jannings 6250 



1927 
..Dec. 3 



1927 
.Nov. 26 



Excellent 

1927 

Back to Liberty Walsh-Breese 5980 Nov. 10 

Bowery Cinderella (M) .... O'Malley-HuIette 6900. Nov. 1 

Broadway Madness De La Motte-Kelth.._6300 Oct. 1 

Nest, The (D) Frederick-Herbert ....7393 _Aug. 1 

Satan and the Woman.... Windeor-C. Keefe 6900 Dec. 20 

Stronger WUI, The Percy Marmont 

Tour Wife and Mine <P).. Phyllis Haver 5867..._.SeDt. 1 

F B 0 

1927 1927 

Aflame in the Sky (M)....Luden-Lynn Dec. 18 Dec. 10 

Bandit's Son, The (W).. Bob Steele 4765 Nov. 20 .._Dec. 10 

Breed of Courage (D) Ranger „4910 Aug. 7 

Boy Rider, The (W) Buzz Barton 4858. Oct. 23. Dec. 8 Oct. 8 

Cherokee Kid, The (W) ....Tyler-Lynn 4837. Oct. 80 -Nov. 26 

Clancy's Kosher Wed- 
ding (CD) George Sidney 5701 Sept. 17 Sept. 10 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures Reviews 



Coward, The (D) 

Desert Pirate (W) 

Don Mike (RD) 

Flying U Ranch, 

The (W) _ 

Gambler's Game, 

The (W) „ 

Gingham Girl, The (C)... 
Great Mail Robbery, 

The (M) — 

Harvester, The (D) 

Hook and Ladder 

No. 9 (D) 

In a Moment of Temp- 
tation (M) 

Jake the Plumber (C) 

Judgment of the 

Hills (D) 

Legionnaires in 

Paris (C) _ ~. 

Lightning Lariats (W)... 
Loves of Ricardo (D)... 

Magic Garden (D) 

Mojave Kid, The (W) 

Moon of Israel (D) 

Mother (D) 

Moulders of Men (M) 

Naughty Nannette (CD). 
Not for PubUcation (M). 

Outlaw Dog (M) 

Racing Romeo (D) — 

Ranger of the 

North (D) _ 

Shanghaied (M) 

Silver Comes Thru 
Slingshot Kid, The (M)_ 

Sonora Kid (W) 

South Sea Love (D) 

Swift Shadow, The (D)... 
Tarzan and the Golden 

Lion — 

When the Law Rides 

<W) 

1928 

Chicago After Midnight 
(M) 

Coney Island (D) - 

Dead Man's Curve (D)... 

Driftin' Sands (W) 

Little Mickey Grogan 
(D) 

Wizard of the Saddle 
(W) 



Warner Baxter 

.Tom Tyler _ 

Fred Thomson 

Tom Tyler 

Tom Tyler 

Lois Wilson ... 

Von Eltz-Nelson 

Orville Caldwell .... 

Ed Hearne 

Kit Guard 

Jesse De Vorska.... 

Darro-Valli 

Cooke-Guard 

Tyler 

Beban 



.5093 Aug. 21 _ Sept. 10 

..4754 Dec. 25 Dec. 24 

..5723 _ Mar. 6 

.4913 Sept. 4 

..Oct. 30 



Bob Steele 

Maria Corda ... 
Belle Bennett .. 
FVankie Darro 

Viola Dana 

Ralph Ince 

Ranger 

E!ed Grange .... 



6300. Oct. 2 Nov. 26. July 30 

....6507. Aug. 15 _ July* 2 

....7014 JSTov. 23 ....Nov. 19....Nov. 19 

-.5240 Nov. 13 Dec. 3 .Nov. 28 

....5666 Sept. 18... Dec. 10 

....5186 Oct. 16 Dec. 3 

....6481 Nov. 6. Nov. 12....Aug. 20 



_ Dec. 27 Dec. 10 

.4536 Jan. 22 

Dec. 31 

6807 Feb. 26 

.4924 Sept. 25 Aug. 6 

.6680 July 9 

.6885 _ Mar. 19 

..6412 _ Apr. 9 

.4949 May 9 

. 6140 Aug. 31 July 23 

.4721 Apr. 23 

_ Dec. 10 



Ranger 

Ralph Ince 

Thomson 

Buzz Barton 

Tyler 

Patsy Miller . — 

Ranger . _ 

A Jungle Fantasy.. 

Tyler-Darro 



.4941 Oct. 9 Dec. 3 

.6004 Oct. 19 Dec. 3 Aug. 20 

.5476 _ May 28 

..4886 Dec. 4 .Dec. 10 

.4565 Mar. 5 

.6388 Dec. 10 Nov. 12 

..4892 Dec. 11 Dec. 10 



.5807 



..Apr. 2 



...-Dec. 24 



1928 



Ince-Mendez .... 

Lois Wilson 

Fairbanks, Jr. 
Bob Steele 

Frankie Darro 

Buzz Barton .. 



Mar. 4 

Jan. 13 Dec. 17 

..5511 Jan. 15 J3ec. 17 

.4770 Jan. 1 Dec. 17 

.6515 Jan. 80 Dec. 17 

Jan. 22 „ Dec. 24 



First Division 



1927 

Death Valley (W) Carroll Nye 

Finnegan's Ball (C) Mack Swain 

Ladies at Ease (CD) Garon-Short 

Love in a Cottage Betty Compson 

Merry Wives of Windsor-Pauline Garon . 

Polly of the Movies Gertrude SIhort 

Ragtime (D) De La Motte. — 

Return of Boston 

Blackie (D) Glenn-Palmer _ 

Say It With Diamonds Betty (3ompson . 

Temptations of a Shop 

Girl _ Betty Compson 



1927 
Aug. 20 



5900 Oct. 1 

6750 Sept. 15....Jan. 7 

6293 _ Oct. 15 

Dec. 1 

Dec. IB Jan. 7 

6900 Nov. 1 

6700 .Sept. 1 Nov. 26 Sept. S 



...5700... 
...5900... 



...Aug. 1 
..Aug. 15 

..Oct. 15 



1927 

All Aboard (C) 

American Beauty (D). 
An Affair of the 

Follies (D) 

Breakfast at Sunrise 

(CD) 

Broadway Nights (C) 

Camille (D) _ 

Chaser, The (C) 

Convoy (D) 

Crystal Cup, The (D). 

Dance Magic (M) 

Drop Kick, The (D)... 
Easy Pickings (MyM). 

Framed (M) 

Gorilla. The (My) 

Gun Gospel (W) 

High Hat (CD) 



First National 

1927 

J. Hines 6300 April 2 

Billie Dove 6333 Oct. 9 Nov. 19 — Oct. 22 

All-Star 6422 Mar. 6 

C. Talmadge 6042 Oct. 23 Nov. 12._Nov. 26 

L. Wilson 6765 May 21 

Norma Talmadge . 8692 Sept. 4 May 2 

Harry Langdon Feb. 12 

Sherman-Mackaill ....7724 _ _ May 21 

Mackaill-Mulhall 6380..„..Oct. 16 Nov. 12 Oct. 29 

Lyon-Starke 6585 Aug. IS 

Barthlemees 6802 Sept. 26 

A. Q. Nilsson — 5400 Feb. 21 

Sills 5282 July 9 

Murray-Kels^ 7133 Nov. 18 ...Nov. 26...J^ov. 26 

Ken Maynard 6288. — Nov, 6 — Dec. 17 

Lyon 6161 Mar. 19 



I 



46 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures Reviews 



Her Wild Oat (CD) Colleen Moore 

Home Made (C) Johnny Hines — 

Life of Riley (C) Murray-Sidney .. 

Lady in Ermine (D)„ C. Griffith 

Lonesome Ladies (CD).... Nilsson-Stone 

Long Pants (C) Langdon 

Lost at the Front _ Sidney-Murray 

Lore Mart, The Billie Dove 

(Previous title: Louisiana) 

Lunatic at Large (F) L. Errol 

Man Crazy Mackaill-Mulhall 

Masked Woman (D) Nilsson-Blinn 

McFadden's Flats (C) Murray-Conklin , 

Naughty But Nice (C) C. Moore 

Notorious Lady, 

The (D) Stone 

No Place to Go (CD) Hughes-Astor — 

Orchids and Ermine 

(CD) 0. Moore 

Patent Leather Kid (M)..BartheIme6s 

Perfect Sap (C) Lyon-Starke 

Poor Nut (C) Mulhall 

Prince of Head Waiters 

(D) Stone _ 

Red Raiders, The (W) Ken Maynard — 

Rose of the Cktlden 

West (D) Mary Astor 

Sea Tiger (D). — -..Sills — _ 

See You in Jail (FC) Mulhall 

Smile, Brother, Smile 

(CD) _ Mulhall-Maekaill 

Stolen Bride (M) Dove-Hughes 

Sunset Derby (M) Astor-Collier 

Tender Hour (D) Dove-Lyon 

Texas Steer, A (CD) _WiIl Rogers 

Three Hours (MyD) C. Griffith 

Three's a Crowd (C) Langdon — 

Twinkletoes (D) C. Moore 

Valley of the (liants 

(D) Milton Sills ™ 

Venus of Venice (C) C. Talmadge .. 

White Pants Willie (C)..Hines 

1928 

French Dressing (D) Lois Wilson — 

Noose, The (D) Barthelmess _ 

Private Life of Helen of 

Troy, The (CD) Maria Ck>rda _ 

Sailors' Wives (CD) Hughes-Astor 

Shepherd of the Hills 

(D) _ Francis-O'Day 



.6118 Dec. 25. Dec. 3 

.6624 Nov. 20 ....Nov. 26 Oct. 29 

.6712 Sept. 18 Oct. 1 

.6400 Jan. 8 

.5718 - Sept. 24 

.5550 . - Apr. 9 

.5559 -...June 25 

. 7388 JDec. 18 



.5321 

„5542 Nov. 27. 

.5442 

.7845 

.6520 



.Nov. 26 



...Jeb. 6 

..Jan. 22 
-Feb. 12 
..July 16 



.6040 - 

.6431 Oct. 30- 



_ -...May 14 

..Nov. 12.— .Dec. 10 



.6734 -. 
.11,412- 
.5620 - 
..6897 - 



.6400 

.6214. Sept. 4.. 



Apr. 9 

Aug. 20 

Jan. 22 

Sept. 10 

„ —July 23 

Oct. 15 



.6477 Oct. 2 

.5606 _ „. 

.5800 

.6669. Sept. 11- 

.7179 

.5000 

.6631 

.7419-.-.Dec. 4 

5760 

5668 

7833 



-Nov. 19 Oct. 8 

May 14 

_ - -.Apr. 23 



..Sept. 17 
...Sept. 8 

July 2 

....May 28 



-Dec. 3 



.. Apr. 16 

Oct. 8 

Jan. 1 



Dec. 11 Dec. 24 Dec. 3 

.6300 JUay 7 

.6350 Aug. 6 

1928 

.6344 Jan. 15 S>ec. 10 Dec. 17 

Jan. 29. Dec. 10 



.7694. Jan. 8 Dec. 24 

-..Jan. 22. Dec. 24 



.8188. Jan. 1 Dec. 3 



Fox 



1927 

Ankles Preferred (CD). 
Arizona Wildcat, 
The (W) 



.Bellamy - 5498 



Auctioneer, The 

Blackjack (W) 

Blood Will Tell (W) 

Broncho Twister (W) 

*Cameo Kirby (D) 

Chain Lightning (W). 

Circus Ace, The 

Cradle Snatchers (FC).- 
Come to My House 
(CD) 



Desert Valley (W) 

East Side, West 

SWe (D) 

Gay Retreat, The (C) 

C!ood as (^Id (W) 

Heart of Salome (VlyR). 

High School Hero (C) 

Hills of Peril (W) 

•Honor First (D) 

Is Zat So7 (CD) 

Joy (art. The (CD) 

Ladles Must Dress (CD). 

Last Trail (W) 

Lore Makes 'Em 
WUd (D) 



Tom Mix 

Sidney 

Buck Jones 

Buck Jonee 

Mix - 

John Gilbert 

Buck Jones 

Mix 

Fazenda 



Olive Borden 

, Jones 

O'Brien- Valli 

. Cohen-McNamara 

.Jones 

.Rubens 

.Phipps-Stuart 

.Jones 

John 



-Jlov. 20. 



_4665_ 

-5500 

-.4777. 

...4666.. 

™5425 

-6078- 

-.5333.. 

.-4810 

.-6381 



.4300..-..Dec. 25 Jan. 7 

-4731 



_Sept. 25 
-..Nov. 13- 

Aug. 28 

— Aug. 14 



1927 
Mach 12 

Nov. 19 
.. Feb. 5 



Oct. 9 Jan. 7- 

.Sept. 25..- 



..Oct. 16- 



Gilbert 

O'Brien-Lowe 

Olive Borden 

Virginia Valli 

Mix 



.8154., 
-5524. 
-4545 
.6617 
_5516. 

_4983 

-4851 Sept. 18 

-6940 

.6162. 
.5599, 
.5190 



Nov. 12 
April 2 



June 18 
June 4 



„ Jan. 8 

....Oct. 22 
— Oct. 1 
June 11 
May 9 
, Oct. 29 
May 14 



Sept. 18 — .. 

Nov. 20 —Nov. 19. 



Loves of Carmen (D). 
Madame Wants No 

Children 

Marriage (D) 



Monkey Talks (D). 

Mosie Master (D) 

One Increasine Purpose 
(D) 



.Harron 

. McLaglen-Del Rio 



.Corda 
.Valli 



..8538 

.8538 Sept. 4- 



May 21 
Sept. 24 
....Dec. 17 
... Feb. 5 

. Oct. 1 
-Oct. 8 



.Lemer 

,A. B. Francis 



Outlaws of Red River 
(W) 



Paid to Lore (D> 

Pajamas (CD) 

Publicity Madness (CD). 
Rich But Honest (CD)-. 
Secret Studio, The (CD). 

Seventh Heaven (R) 

*Shame (M) 

Silk Legs (CD).. 



Silver Valley (W) 

Singed (D) 

Slaves of Beauty (D) 

Stage Madness (D) 

•St. Elmo (M)..._ -. 

Summer Bachelors (CD). 

Sunrise (D) 

Tumbling River (W) 

Truxton King 

Two Girls Wanted (CD)., 

Upstream (D) ._ 

Very Confidential (CD) 
War Horse (W)-, 



, Lowe 

Mix 

O'Brien- Valli _ 

Borden-Gray 

Moran-Lowa 

Beebe 

Borden 

FTarrell-Gaynor . 

John Gilbert 

Madge Ballamy . 

Tom Mix 

.Baxter-Sweet . 

Herrbert>Tell 

Valli 



.5415 
-6440 
.5500 
.7734 



.7677 



What Price Glory (CD). 



John Gilbert 

Bellamy 

O'Brien-Gaynor 
Tom Mix-Dawn . 

Janet Gajmor 

Foxo 

Madge Bellamy . 

Jonee 

McLaglen-Ixrwe 



-6827 . 
_6898_ 
_5876_ 
_6893..- 
_6480 ., 
-5870 - 
-10726- 
-5467— 
.5446..- 
..5009.- 
..5792-.. 
-5412 
-5620 
-4943..- 
..6782 ., 
-10000 
-4675..- 
4299..- 
-6293..- 
-5510 . 
-5620— 
..4963 . 
.11109- 



.Ang. 4 

..Oct. 28 

..Oct. 2 



..Oct. 80 — 

..Nov. 27 — 

.Dec. 18 Dec. 31 

..Oct. 2 Dec. 17.. 

-Aug. 21 



Apr. 16 
Feb. 26 
. Mar. 6 
Jan. 22 

Jan. 16 

Apr. 23 
. Aug. 6 
Dec. 10 

June 4 
June 25 

...May 28 
...Nov. 26 



-.Oct. 9 



..Aug. 21. 
.Oct. 30 
..Sept. 11 

ISovT'e-! 

.'lAug."28~ 



....Oct. 29 
July 16 
June 11 
Jan. 29 

. Jan. 1 
... Oct. 1 
Aug. 27 



...Feb. 12 
Nov. 12 
. Feb. 19 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures Reviews 



1928 

Whispering Sage (W) Jonee 



.4783 -._ 

.5629 Dec. 11 

.5531 J^ov. 27 



1928 

..-Apr. 9 
..- Dec. 8 



Wizard, The (MyD) liOwe-Hyams .. 

Wolf Fangs (D) Thunder (Dog) 

Branded Sombrero, 

The (W) Buck Jones 4612. Jan. 8 

$5,000 Reward (W) Tom Mix 5000 Jan. 16.-.. 

Girl in Every Port, A 

(CD) Victor McLaglen Jan. 29 

Holiday Lane . — —Jan. 22 

Sharp Shooters - O'Brien-Moran Jan. 15 

Woman Wise Russell-CoUyer 5050 Jan. 8 



Gotham 

1927 1927 
Blondes by Choice (C).. -Claire Windsor .-_ 6987 Oct. 1 Dec. 31 

Cheer Leader, The (CD)..Grave3-01mstead 5800 JSTov. 16 

'Frisco Nights (D) -...Percy Maxmont 6200 Dec. 1 Dec. 10 

Final Extra (M)...- De La Motta 6000 _ Feb. 19 

Girl from Rio, The (D)..Carmel Myers 5950 Sept. 1 Nov. 26.-.Sept. 24 

Heroes of the Night (M)..Landis-Nixou 6500 Feb. 5 

Rose of Kildare, 

The (D) Helene Chadwick ...-.6700 Aug. IB —Nov. 19 

Satin Woman, The (D) — Mrs. Wallace Reid..-6760 Aug. 1 Nov. 19-.Ji.ug. 18 

1928 1928 
Bare Knees (D) Mae Busch — -.6000 Feb. 1 Jan. 7 

United States Smith(D)-All-Star Cast. „7000. Jan. 1 



Krelbar Productions 



1927 

Broadway After Mid- 
night _..Betz 



.6199- 



Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 



1927 

Adam and Evil (CD)..- 
Adventurer, The (W)._ 

After Midiught (D) 

Annie Laurie (D) 

Becky (CD) 

Ben Hur (M) 

Big City (D) 

Big Parade, The (M)— 

Body and Soul (D) 

Bridal Night, The_ 



Bugle Gall, The (D) „. 

Buttons (CD) 

Callahans and Murphyg 

(CD) 

Captain Salvation (M) 
Certain Young Man, 
A (D) 



. (3ody-Pringle 

.Tim McCoy 

.Shearer-CJray 

.Lillian Gish 

.Sally O-Neil 

.Ramon Novarro 

.Lon Chaney 

.Gilbert-Adoree 

.L. Barrymore 

.Norma Shearer „ 
.Jackie Coogan _ 
.Jackie Coogan - 



1927 
..Oct. 2> 



1927 
— An». U 



-6667 Aug. 27 

-4709 J>ec 10 

-6312 Aug. 20 Aug. 27 

.8730 Sept. 17 May 21 

.6439— Nov. 12 —Nov. 26 

.12000— Oct. 8.- Nov. 12 



-12660— Sept. 10 

.5902 Oct. 1 — 

Dec. 81 

.682] Aug. 6 

.6060 Dec. 24- 



.Nov. 26 Nov. 1» 

.Dec. 31 



-Dresser-Moran 6126 

Hanson 7396 



..July IS 
.„July 2 



Cossack, The (D) 

Demj-Bride {CO) 

Enemy, The (D) 

Pair Oo-ed, The (CD)... 

Foreign Devils (W) 

Frisco Sally Levy (C)... 
Garden of Allah, 

The (D) 

In Old Kentucky (D) 

Law of the Range, 

The (W) 

Litde Journey (CD) 

London After Midnight 

(D) 

Lovers (D) . 

Lovelorn, The .- 

Man, Woman and 

Sin (D) 

Mr. Wu (M) 

Mockery (M) 

Patsy, The (CD) 

Red MiU (C) 



.Novarro-Adoree ... 

.John Gilbert 

.Shearer 



-6886 



.....Sept. 24 



- L. Gish-Forbes. 

-Marion Davies 6408 .Oct. 16— 

..Tim McCoy 4658..-..Sept. 8 

-O'Neil 6909 



-.Apr. 2 

Dec. 31 

-Nov. 10._...Oct. 29 



. Terry-Petrovitch 
.H. CosteUo 

. McCoy-Crawford 
.All-star 



.8156 JIov. 6- 

.6646. Oct. 29- 



.6088 



-Lon Ckaney . 5687 Dec. 3— 

.Novarro-Terry 5291 

.Sally O'Neil 6110 — Dec. 17- 



Apr. 2S 

_Nov. 19 Sept. 10 

-.Nov. 26 J)ec. 8 



Jan. 16 

.Dec. 17 Dec. 17 

May 2 

-Dec. 31 



.Jrfin Gilbert 
.Lon (Thaney . 
.Lon Oianey 



.Marion Davies 
.I>avieB 6337 



.6280 Nov. 19— Dec. 3. 

.7603 

.5967 Aug. 13 



..-Dec. 17 

June 4 

-Sept. 10 

-Jeb. 19 



Road to Romance, 

The (D) 

Rookies (C) 

Rose Marie (CD) 

Show, The (M) 

Slide, Kelly. Slide (CD). 

Spring Fever (C) 

Spoilers of the West 

(W) 

Taxi Dancer (D) 

Tea for Three (C) 

Thirteenth Hour, 

The (D) __ 

Tillie the Toiler (C) 

Twelve Miles Out (M)... 
Understanding Heart 

(D) 

Unknown, The (M) 

1928 



-Sept. 24- 



Novarro-Day 6581- 

Dane- Arthur 6640 - 

J. Murray-Crawford- 

Gilbert-Adoree 6309 

Haines-O'Ndl 7866 

William Haines 6705 Oct. 22... 

McC!oy-Daw 6280..— JJec. 10— 

Crawford-0. Moore.._6203 

Cody-Pringle 6273. — Dec. 10— 

Lionel Barrymore — 5252 Nov. 26.. 

Davies —6160 

(Jilbert 7899 



Crawford 
(Thaney .. 



— 6657 
-.5517 



Divine Woman, The (D), 

Forbidden Honrs (D) 

Love (D) 

Quality Street (D) 

Student Prince. The (R) 
West Point (CD) . 



..Garbo-Hanson Jan. 14 

.Novarro-Adoree Jan. 7 

— Gilbert-Garbo 7866...- Jan. 2 — 

-Marion Davies 7627 — Jan. 28... 



-Novarro-Shearer 9666 — Jan. 25 — 

Haines-Crawford 8134 Jan. 21 



.Nov. 19 

May 9 

Mar. 19 

Apr. 2 

.Nov. 12 X)ec. 10 

Dec. 24 

Mar. 12 

.Dec. 24 J^ov. 12 

.Dec. 3 Dec. 3 

June 11 

July 30 

Jday 14 

June 19 

1928 



.Jan. 7— Dec. 8: 

.Jan. 7 Nov. 12 

Sept. 2* 



J 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



47 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures Reviews 



Paramount 



1927 

Afraid to Love (C) 

Barbed Wire (D) 

Bean Geste (M) 

Blind AUeys (M) 

Blonde or Brunette? (C).. 

Cabaret (CD) 

Casey at the Bat (0) 

Chang: (D) 

Children of Divorce (D).. 
City Gone Wild, 

The (M) 

♦Covered Wagon, The 

(M) 

Evening Clothes (C).... 
Fashions for Women 

(CD) 
Fireman Save My 

Child (C) 

Gay Defender, The (CD).. 
Gentleman of Paris, 

A (CD) _., 

Get Your Man (CD) 

Honeymoon Hate (CD).... 

Hotel Imperial (D) 

Hula (CD) 

It (C) 

Jesse James (D). 

Kid Brother (C) 

Kiss in a Taxi (C) 

Knockout Reilly (CD) 

Last Waltz, The (D) 

Let It Bain (C) 

Love's Greatest Mistake 

(CD) 

Man Power (D) 

Mme. Pompadour (D) 

Metropolis (D) 

New York (M) 

Nevada (W) 

Now We're in the 

Air (C) ._ 

One Woman to Another 

(CD) 

Open Range (W) 

Paradise for Two (C) 

Pioneer Scout, The (W)_ 

Potters (CD) 

Ritzy (CD) 

Road to Glory, The (D).. 
Rolled Stockings (CD).._ 
Rough House Rosie (C).. 
Rough Riders, The (D)._ 

Rubber Heels (FC) 

Rimning Wild (C)._ 

Senorita (F) 

Serenade (D) 

Service for Ladies ((J) 

Shanghai Bound (D) 

She's a Sheik (C) 

Shootin' Irons (W) 

Soft Cushions (C) ™ 

Special Delivery (C) 

Spotlight, The (CD)_ 

Street of Sin (D) 

Stark Love (D) _ 

Swim, Girl, Swim (CM).. 

Telephone Girl (M) 

Tell It to Sweeney (C)..„ 
Ten Modem Command- 
ments (CD) 

Time to Love (FC) 

Two Flaming Youths 

(C) „. 

Underworld (M) 

Way of All Flesh, 

The (D) _._ 

We're All Gamblers (D).. 

Wedding Bills (F) 

Whirlwind of Youth (D).. 

Wings (M) „ 

Woman on Trial (D) 



1928 



1927 

.Vidor _ 6199 _ Apr. 23 

Negri-Brook _ 6951 Sept. 10..- -Aug. 13 

Colman-N. Beery 9879 Aug. 1 

Meighan _ 5597 Mar. 5 

Menjou 5878 _ _ Jan. 16 

Gilda Gray 7175 May 9 

W. Beery 6040 _ Apr. 16 

Jungle Life 6536 Sept. 3 May 2 

Bow .._ 6871 May 2 

— Meighan-Millner 5408..._.Nov. 12 Dec. 10 



Kerrigan-Wilson 7447 Aug. 6 

Menjou 6287 _ _ 



Ralston 6298 



..Apr. 9 
..Apr. 9 



Beery-Hatton _ 5399 Aug. 1 .~ Dec. 10 

Richard Dix 6376 Dec. 10__ „..-Nov. 12 

Menjou-O'Hara 5927 Oct. 15__ Oct. 8 

Clara Bow 5880 _Dec. 12 Jan. 7 

Florence Vidor 5415..._.Dec. 3 Dec. 31 Dec. 17 

Negri 7091 Jan. 8 

Bow-Brook 5862. Aug. 27 _ Sept. 10 

aara Bow 6542 _ _.JFeb. 12 

Fred Thomson 8656. Oct. 22 _ _...Oct. 22 

Lloyd 7654 Jan. 29 

Daniels -.6429 Apr. 2 

Dix _ 7080 Apr. 23 

Special Cast _ 6940 Nov, 26 Nov. 19 

MacLean 6052 Mar. 12 

-Brent „„ 6000 _ _ Feb. 26 

■ Dix 5617 „ _ _ JVug. 6 

-Moreno-D. Gish 7180 Aug. 13 _..Nov. 26 Aug. 6 

.Special Cast _....8039. Aug. 13 Mar. 12 

.Ck)rtez- Wilson 6877 JFeh. 5 

.Cooper-Todd 6258...-.Sept. 10 



Beery-Hatton 5798 



__Dec. 17 



• Vido-Shotwell 4022 Sept. 

Lane Chandler 5599 Nov. 

Dix-Bronson -.6187 

Fred Thomson _ —Jan. 

W. C. Fields _ 6680 

Bronson 5306 

Jannings-Brent 

Hall-Brook 6247 _ 

Bow 5952 

Aetor-Farrell 8443. Oct. 

Ed Wynn 5614 

Fields-Brian ~ 8368 Aug. 

Daniels 6634 

Menjou-Wray 5209 Dec. 

Menjou-Carver 6170 Aug. 

Dix-Brian 5515..._.Oct. 

Bebe Daniels _ 6015 Nov. 

.Luden-Bronson 5179 Oct. 

MacLean-Carol 6838 Aug. 

Eddie Cantor 5524 

.Ralston-Hamilton 4943 JNov. 

.Jannings-Wray _ Dec. 

.Special Cast 6203 Sept. 

Daniels-Hall _ 6124. Sept. 

.Bellamy _ 5455 

.Conklin-Bancroft 6006 Sept. 



24 .Sept. 24 

5 

Jan. 29 



21 Dee. 10 



....Jan. 22 
...June 25 



1 



July 30 

June 4 

Mar. 19 

July 16 

£0 June 18 

JMay 14 

24 

6 :._...Sept. 3 

15 Dec. 31 Nov. 12 

12 - Nov. 26 



27 . 



..Aug. 27 

May 9 

JDec. 3 



19 

in 

17 Mar. 19 

17 Sept. 17 

„ May 21 

24...Jan. 7 Oct. 22 



Ralston 6497 „...July 23 

Raymond Griffith 4926 _ July 9 

Field3-C!onkIin 5319 Dec. 17 

Bancroft-Brent 7453 Oct. 29 _ Sept. 3 

Jannings-Bennett 8486 Oct. 1 July 2 

Meighan-Millner 5935 Sept. 3 

Raymond Griffith 5869 July 23 

Lois Moran 5866 _ June 11 

Charles Rogers _ _ Aug. 20 

Pola Negri _ 5960 Oct. 29 Dec. 24 Oct. 1 



1928 



Adventure Mad (M) UFA _ Mar. 31 

Bean Sabreur (M) Cooper-Brent —.6536 Jan. 7... 

Beauty Doctor, The. Adolphe Menjou. Mar. 24 

Doomsday Vidor-CJooper Feb. 18 

Feel My Pulse Daniels-Arlen _.Feb. 25 

Gentlemen Prefer 

Blondes (C) Taylor-White » Jan. 28.. 

Glory Girl, The (CD) Esther Raleton Jan. 21 

Honky Tonk (M) George Bancroft Feb. 25 

Jazz Orphan, The (CD)..Esther Ralston Jan. 14 

Last Ck>mmand, The (D)..Emil Jannings Jan. 21 

Legion of Condemned, 

The Wray-(3ooper Mar. 10 

Love and Learn Ralston-(7handler Jan. 14 

Now We're in Dutch 

(C) Beery-Hatton Jan. 14 

Old Ironsides (D) „ Beery-Bancroft 

Farrell-Ralston Mar. 3 

Partners in Crime (C).... Beery-Hatton .._ Mar. 17 

Peaks of Destiny _.UFA Jan. 28 

Red Hair (CD) Bow-Rogers _ Mar. 3 

Santa Fe Scout, 

The (W) __Fred Thomson Jan. 21 

Secret Hour, The (D) Negri-Hereholt 7194 J'eb. 4 

Speedy (C) _ Harold Lloyd Mar. 3 

Tillie's Punctured 

Romance PIilda-C!onklin _ Feb. 18 

Traveling Salesman „.Dix-Stedman JFeb. U 

Under the Tonto Rim Arlen-Brian _ Feb. 4. 

Wife Savers (C) Beery-Hatton -.Jan. 7 



..Jan. 7 



..Dec. 10 



Jan. 7 



Title 



Players 



New 

Lengrth Released Pictures 



Reviews 



Pathe 



1927 

Almost Human (CD) Reynolds 

Angel of Broadway, 

The (D) _ _ Leatrice Joy..- 

Avenging Fangs (M) 

Border Blackbirds (WD)..Maloney 



1927 



..5596.. 



..Dec. 26......Dec. 24 



Born to Battle (W) Bill Cody 

Code of the Cow 

Country (W)_- Roosevelt 

Combat (D) Walsh-Adams 

Country Doctor, The (D)-Schildkraut 

Desert of the Lost, 

The (W) ..-Wairy Wales 

Devil's Twin, The (W)..-Leo Maloney 

Discord (D) Dagover-Ekman 



-6555 Oct. 3 Nov. 19 Nov. 5 

..4335 - _ June 4 

_5826..-..Aug. 28 -....Sept. 10 

.4875 Sept. 11 



June 11 

Oct. 15 



.4512 

-5100. Oct. 23 

.7400. Aug. 22 



4933. Dec. 18 

5468 Dec. ll._ Dec. 10 

8586 -Nov. 20 

5804 May 9 —May 9 

6599 J^ov. 11 Nov. 19 JSTov. 5 

6228 May 14 

7107 — -...June 4 

7972 Aug. 29 Sept. 17 

6403 Dec. 5 



Don Desperado (W) Maloney 

Dress Parade (D) Boyd-Love 

Eyes of the Totem (M)— Hawley -.. 

Fighting Love (D) Goudal 

Fighting Eagle, The (M)..La Roque-Haver. 

Flying Luck (C) Monty Banks 

Forbidden Woman, 

The (M) _ — Jetta Goudal..- 6568 Nov. 7 Nov. 12 Nov. 5 

Getting Gertie's 

Garter (F) Prevost 6859..- JFeh. 19 

Girl from Every- 
where (C) 3303 - Nov. B 

Girl in the Pullman, 
The (C) Prevoat-Ford 



Gold from Weepah (W)-..Bill Cody. 

Golden Clown, The (D)__(3o3ta-Ekman 

'Grandma's Boy (C) Harold Lloyd. 

Harp in Hock, A (D) Schildkraut 

Heart of the Yukon (M)„Bowers 

Heart Thief (D) Schildkraut-De Putt!.. 

His Dog (D) Schildkraut 

His First Flame (C) Langdon 

His Foreign Wife (D)..-..Bdna Murphy 

Hidden Aces (M) Hutchison-Calhoun. 

Hoof Marks (W) Jack Donovan 

Interferin' Gent, 

The (W) Buflfalo Bill, Jr 

Jim, the (Conqueror (W)_Boyd-Faire 

King of Kings (D) All star. 



.5867. Oct. 31 Nov. 19 Nov. 5 



4960 Nov. 

.7913.-..JDeo. 

4750 J5ec. 

.5990 Oct. 

.6563 

.6035 

.6788 

4700- 



Land of the Lawless, 
The (W). 



.4890 2fov. 27 

4620 Aug. 7 

4076 Nov. 13 

4864 Aug. 21 

5324 

13500 _. 



-Nov. 12 Nov. 6 

May 21 

May 21 

Sept. 3 

- May 9 



Sept. S 



jVug. 27 

-...Jan. 1 

Apr. 28 



.Jack Padjan 



Little Firebrand (C) Thornton 

Main Event, The (D) Reynolds-Delaney 

Man Bait (CD) Prevost 

Meddlin' Stranger (W)— Wales 

My Friend from 

India (F) Pangbom-Fair 

Night Bride (FC) Prevost 

Nobody's Widow (FC) Joy-Iiay-Haver 

No Man's Law (W) Rex 

Obligin' Bnckaroo, 

The (W) Buffalo Bill, Jr 

Pals in Peril (W) Buffalo Bill, Jr 

Phantom Buster, 

The (W) - -...Roosevelt-Rayford 

Pieces of China (Travel) - 

Pirates of the Sky (M) Hutchison _ 

Rejuvenation of Aunt 

Mary (C) _ Robson _ _ 

Ride 'Em High (W) Buddy Roosevelt 

Roarin' Broncs Buffalo Bill, Jr 

Rubber Tires (C) -...Ford-Love 

Rush Hour, The (C) -.Prevost-Ford - 

Skeedaddle Gold (W) Wales 

Soda-Water Cowboy, 

The (W) -..Wally Wales 

Trunk Mystery (M) -.Hutchison _. 

Two-Gun of Tumble- 
weed (W) _ 

Turkish Delight __ Schildkraut-Faye - 

Vanity (M) _ - Joy 

White Gold (D) Goudal 

White Pebbles (WD) Wally Wales 

Wise Wife, The (C) -.Haver-T. Moore 

Wreck of the Hesperus, 

The (M) Hale-De Grasse 

Yankee Clipper (M) Boyd 



-4131 Dec. 25 

..4615 July 2 July 2 

..6472.-...N0V. 18 Nov. 19 JJov. 5 

_5865 Jan. 29 Jan. 29 

-4576 June 4 

..i5750 Dec. 19....- Dec. 24 

-5736 May 9 

..6421 Jan. 15 

_6903 - May 2 



.4575- 
.4740.. 



..Oct. 16 



-_ Oct. 8 

June 25 



..Aug. 20 



.5000 Aug. 14 

.6000 Aug. 7 

.5465— -....May 21 

5844 Aug. 6 

4542 Oct. 9 - Oct. 8 

4375 J^ov. 27 

.6303 Apr. 9 

5880 Deo. 12 Jan. 7. 

.4562 Aug. 6 



4546 Sept. 25.. 

4329 



Oct. 1 

„ June 11 

5670 -. July 23 

.5397 Nov. 11 

5921 June 18 

6198 _ Apr. 9 

4485. Sept. 4 Aug. 20 

5610. Oct. 24 Nov. 19 Nov. 5 



7820.. 



..Oct. 31 



1928 

Ballyhoo Buster (W) Buffalo Bill, Jr Jan. 8 

Blue Danube - Leatrice Joy Feb. 20 

Chicago (M) Phyllis Haver 5503 Ma.r. 5 Dec. 24 

Cowboy Cavalier (W) Buddy Roosevelt. 5426 Jan. 29 

Laddie Be Good (W) Bill Cody - Jan. 1 

Leopard Lady, The (M).... Logan-Hale Jan. 23 

Let 'Er Go 

Gallegherl (M) Junior Coghlan —Jan. 

On to Reno (D) Prevost-Landis Jan. 

Perfect Gentleman, 

A (C) Monty Banks 5626 Jan. 15.. 

Stand and Deliver Rod La Rocque. Mar. 12 

Walking Back (M) Vera Reynolds — Mar. 26 

What Price Beauty 

(CD) JSTita Naldi _ Jan. 22 



..May 14 
1928 



16 

2 Dec. 31 



Sept. 24 



Rayart 



1927 

Cruise of the Helion (D)..A11 star _ 6089 

Heroes in Blue (M) Bowers-Rand - Nov. 

Law and the Man, 

The (D) Santschi-Rbckwell Dec. 

Light in the Window, 

A (P) Walthal - 5960 _ 

On the Stroke of 

(Twelve (M). D. Torrence. Nov. 

Silent Hero (M) Bonaparte - 5502 

Wanderer of the 

West, A (W) Tex Maynard— , -Dec. 

Wild Bom (W)...- -..Tex Maynard. -Jan. 



1927 
..Sept. 24 



..Nov. 12 
-Aug. 20 



48 



EXfflBITORS HERALD and 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures Reviews 



1928 

Casey Jones (CD)...... 

Heart of Broadway, 
The (D) — 



..Price-Lewis 



.Garon-Agnew 



„Jan. 
...Jan. 



1928 



Sterling 



1927 

Bamins Up Broadway 

(D) H. Costello _ Jan. 30 Dec. 3 

Closed Gates (M) _..Harron-Novak 5563 

Outcast Souls (D) Lewis-Bonner — ~5400 Dec. 15 Nov. 12 

Pretty Clothes (D) J. Ralston-Walker 5500 Oct. IB Dee. 81 

Stranded (D) _ Mason -Aug. 15 Jan. 7.... 

1928 

Marry the Girl (CD) 



1927 

..May 28 



Tiffany-Stahl 



1927 

Backstage (CD) 

Beauty Shoppe (CD) 

Broken Gate (D) 

Cheaters (M)_ 

College Days (CD) 

Enchanted Island (D) 

First Night, The (FC).. 
Fools of Fashion (CD).., 
Girl from Gay Paree, 

The (F) _ _ 

Haunted Ship, The (M) 

Husband Hunters (C) 

Josselyn's Wife (D) 

Lightning (W) 

Night Life (CD) 

Once and Forever (D) 

Sin Cargo (D) 

Snowbound (FC) 

Streets of Shanghai 

(BD) 

Tired Business Man (C) 

Wild Geese (D) 

Women's Wares (D) 

1928 

Woman Against the 
World (D) 



.Bedford 5754 

.Busch 5669 

rO'MalTey "I.""!'.!;~!.TZ6024'.;!Z'.Z 

.M. Day — 7300 

4887 

.Lytell-Devore 5500 

.Busch _6482 



.Sept. 10 
1928 



1927 

July 9 

...July 16 
—Jan. 15 
..J4ar. 24 
_...Nov. 6 
...June 26 
-Feb. 19 
Oct. 9 



-Sherman-Bedford 5233 Sept. 15.._Nov. 19....Sept. 24 

..Sebastian-M. Love.. — 4753 Dec. 1 

..Marsh 5600 Feb. 26 

-Frederick 5800 Nov. 27 

.J. Ralston 6049. Sept. 1 

.Day-Harron 6235 J^ov. 1 Dec. 3 Dec. 10 

-Patsy Ruth Miller 5639 Oct. 15 Nov. 12 

-Mason _ 6100 — Dec. 11 

-Blythe — - 5182 _ _ July 30 

...Starke-Harlan J)ec. 15 



.Belle Bennett -.6448 J^ov. 15 Dec. 24.. 

.Brent-Lytell 5614 Oct. 1 Nov. 12.. 



...Dec. 10 
...Nov. 19 



1928 



_01mstead-Ford _ Jan. 1 



1927 

Beloved Rogue (M) 

College (C)..._ 



Garden of Eden, The (D) 

General, The (C) 

Loves of Sonya (D) 

Magic Flame, The (M).... 

My Best Girl (M) 

Night of Love (M) 

Resurrection (M) 

Sadie Thompson (D) 

Sorrcll and Son (D) 

Tempest (M) 

Topsy and Eva (C) 

Two Arabian 

Knights (CD) 

Winning of Barbara 
worth (D) 

1928 

Circus, The (C) 

Devil Dancer, The__„_ 
Douglas Fairbanks as 

the Gaucho (M) 

Dove, The (M) 

Drums of Love (D) 

Ramona (D) 



United Artists 

1927 

J. Barrymore 9264 _ Apr. 2 

•Keaton-Cornwall 5900 Sept. 10._ Sept. 17 

0. Griffith-Ray _ „ ...Nov. 

.Keaton 7500 _ _ Feb. 12 

.Swanson .7311 „ Mar. 19 

Ctolman-Banky .8550 .Sept. 24— Sept. 24 

Mary Pickford Nov. Nov. 12 

Banky-Colman — 7440 Jan. 29 



,La Rocqne..- _ 9120 Apr. 16 

Gloria Swanson ~ Dee. 

.Warner-Nileson —.-9000 Nov. _ Nov. 19 

-John Barrymore. Dec. 

.Duncan Sisters 7456 _ - Aug. 13 



Boyd-Wolheim 
Banky-Colman 



.8250.. 
.8000.. 



..Oct. 29 



..Dec. 4 
1928 



..Charlie C!haplin.. 
..Gilda Gray 



.Fairbanks „ _...Nov. 26 

.Norma Talmadge Jan Jan. 7 

. Mary Philbin _ Jan. 



Universal 



1927 

Back to Ciod's Country 

(D) _ 

Beware of Widows (FC). 
Border Cavalier, 

The (W) 

Buck Privates „ 

Butterflies in the Rain 

(D) _ _ 

Cat and the Canary, 

The (My) 

Cheating Cheaters (C)... 
Chinese Parrot, The 

(MyD) _ 

Claw, The (D) _.. 

Clean Up Man, The (W). 

Denver Dude (W) 

Desert Dust (W) 

Down the Stretch (M) 

Fangs of Destiny (W)... 

Fighting Three (W) _ 

Fourth Commandment 

(D) _ 

Foreign Legion (D) 

Galloping Fury (W) 

Grinning Guns (W) 

Held by the Law (M) 

Hero for the Night, A 

Hey, Rube (W) 



1927 



..Sept. 4 2<Sov. 12 Aug. 6 

May 9 



.Adoree-Frazier 5751.. 

.La Plante 5777.. 

Humes-Pierce 4427 Sept. 18 

Lya De Putti Nov. 6 

La Plante 7319 - Jan. 1 

La Plante .'. 7790 Sept. ll....Dec. 17 May 14 

.(Dompson-Harland 5623 Oct. 9 Nov. 26 

.Nixon-Turner _. -.7304 Oct. 23. Nov. 26 

.Windsor 5252 May 28 

.Ted Wells 4232 Dec. 18 

Gibson 5292 Feb. 26 

.Ted Wells..- 4349 Dec. 18 Dec. 17 

.Agnew 6910 May 2 

.Dynamite 3295 Dec. 4 

.Hoxie 4198 May 21 



..6892.. 



-Apr. 28 



.Bennett 

.Kerry-Stone - 

-Hoot Gibson 5503 Nov. 20 — Dec. 24 

.Hoxie - 4689 —May 14 

.Lewis 6929 Apr. 2 

.Tryon-Miller 5711 Dec. 18... — Not. 26 

.Hoot Gibson - 



Title 



Players 



New 

Length Released Pictures Reviews 



..5378.. 



..Apr. 9 



..6958 ...Deo. 4 JJec. 17..._.Nov. 19 

..Oct. 23 -...Aug. 27 



..Sept. 18__Nov. 12 



..Dec. 25 Dec. 17- 



...Jan. 22 

..Jilay 21 

...Sept. 17 
Apr. 9 



17 



Hey! Hey I Cowboy (W)„Gibson 

Irresistible Lover, The 

(CD) - Kerry-Moran 

Jazz Mad (D) Hersholt-Nixon 

Les Miserables (M) Gabrio-Toulont -7713.. 

Les Miserables (M) (Long version).- 11,000- 

Loco Luck (W) -.Acord - 4827.. 

Lone Eagle, The Kent-Keane 5862.. 

Love Thrill (FC) La Plante 6038.. 

Man Who Laughs (D) ....Veidt-Philbin 

Man's Past, A (D) Veidt^Kent 6135.. 

Men of Daring (W) Hoxie — 6155- 

On Your Toes (C) Denny-Worth 5918. — Nov. 27 

One Glorious Scrap — Humes-Holmes 4122. JJov. 20 Dec. 

One Man Game (W) Humes -. 4689 Feb. 12 

Out All Night (C).- Denny-Nixon 6170 Sept. 4 Oct. 1 

Painted Ponies (W) Hoot Gibson..- 5416 Sept. 25....Nov. 19 July 23 

Painting the Town (FC)..Tryon 5900 June 25 

Perch of the Devil (M).... Busch _. -..6807 — Feb. 5 

Rough and Ready (W)....Hoxie 4409. Jan. 8 

Sensation Seekers (D)..._.Dove 7015 _.. Jan. 29 

Shield of Honor (M) Lewis 6172 Dec. 17 

Silk Stockings Laura La Plante— 6166 Oct. 2 Nov. 19 Aug. 20 

Sky High Saunders Al Wilson 4393...-.Nov. 6 

Small Bachelor, The (C)..Beranger-Kent 6305 Nov. 6 Dec. 3 

Straight Shootin' (W) Wells _ 4259 Oct. 16 

Surrender (M) _ Philbin 8249 Nov. 12 

Taxi! Taxi! (FC) Horton 7172 _ Feb. 19 

Thirteenth Juror, The 

(D) Bushman-Nilsson 5598 Nov. 13 Dec. 3 

13 Washington Square Jean Hersholt 

Three Miles Up Al Wilson -....4041 Sept. 4 

Uncle Tom's Cabin (M)..A11 star 12,000 Nov. 12 

Wild Beauty (CD) Rex — 5192 Nov. 27 Dec. 24 

Wild Blood - Rex _ _ 

Wrong Mr. Wright, The 

(F) Hersholt _ 6450 „ Mar. 6 

Wolf's Trail Dynamite, the dog — .4167 Oct. 2 



1928 

Air Patrol, The (W) Al Wilson 4259 Jan. 1 

Alias the Deacon (CD)....Hersholt>Marlowe 6869 Jan. 22.. 

Call of the Heart, 

The (W) Dynamite _. 4345. Jan. 29 

Cohens and Kellys in 

Paris (C)..._ Sidney .Jan. 1 

Fearless Rider, The (W)..Fred Humes Jan. 15 

Finders Keepers (CD) Laura La Plante Feb. 5 



1928 
..June 26 



Rawhide Kid (W) 

That's My Daddy (C).. 



..Hoot Gibson 5382 Jan. 29 

..Denny-Kent 6073 Feb. 5 



1927 

-..May 9 

..July 28 

....May 2 

..May 28 
...June 18 



Warner Brothers 

1927 

Bitter Apples (M)...„ Blue _ 6453 

Black Diamond 

Express (M) Blue - 5803 

Brass Knuckles (D) _.BIue-Bronson 6330 Dec. 3 

Brute, The (D) Blue 5901 „.. 

Bush Leaguer, The (CD).JiIonte Blue. 6281 Aug. 20 

Climbers, The (D) Rich 6631 _ 

Dearest (D) -.Rich 5897 

Desired Woman, The 

(M) _ Irene Rich 6408. Aug. 27 

Dog of the Reeriment, 

A (M) — _.Rin-Tin-Tin 5003 Oct. 29 

Don't Tell the Wife (C)..Rich 6972 

First Auto, The _ Oldfield-Miller 6767 Sept. 18 

Fortune Hunter, 

The (C)..._ - 5yd Cliaplin 6639 Nov. 7 

Gay Old Bird (FC) Fazenda 6284 

Girl from Chicago, 

The (M) Nagel-Loy 5978 Nov. 5 Dec. 31 

Ginsberg the Great (C)....Jessel _ 6390 J^ov. 26 

Glorious Betsy (CD) - Dolores CJostello 

Good Time Charley (D).. Oland-H. Costello. 6302. Nov. 12 Dec. 31 Nov. 26 

Ham and Eggs at the 

Front (C) _WiIson-H. Conklin 5613 Dec. 24 

Heart of Maryland (M)....D. Costello 5968 

Hills of Kentucky (M). Rin-Tin-Tin 6271 

Husbands for Rent All Star _ 5200 Dec. 31 

If I Were Single McAvoy-Nagel 6230 Dec. 17 

Irish Hearts (CD) ..McAvoy 5397 

Jaws of Steel (D) Rin-Tin-Tin .5569 Sept. 17 

Matinee Ladies (C) McAvoy — 6352 

Million Bid, A (M) D. Costello 6310 

Missing Link, The (C)....Syd Chaplin .6485 Aug. 7 — 

Old San Francisco (M)....D. Costello-Oland 7961 Sept. 4 

One Round Hogan (M)-..Monte Blue 6357 Sept. 17..- -. 

Reno Divorce, A (D) May McAvoy 5492 .Oct. 22 

Sailor Izzy Murphy (F) ....George Jessel 6295 Oct. 8 

Sailor's Sweetheart, 

A (C) Fazenda-C. Cook .5685 Sept. 24 , 

Silver Slave, The (D) Rich-Ferris 6124 Nov. 9 

Slightly Used...- McAvoy-Nagel 6412 Sept. 3 

Simple Sis (M) Fazenda 6218 - 

Third Degree (M) D. Costello 7647 — 

Tracked by the Police 

(M) Rin-Tin-Tin 5813 — .. 

What Every Girl Should 

Know (CD) jailler 6281 

What Happened to 

Father (C) Oland 5567 

When a Man Loves (R).. Barrymore 10081....AuK. 21 

White Flannels (M) Dresser 6820 

Wolf's Clothing (M) Blue-Miller 7068 



Feb. 6 

-...July 9 

-.Mar. 12 



July 30 
Feb. 26 



..June 11 
...Oct. 1 
..Apr. 23 
.—June 4 
..May 14 
..June 26 
... Oct. 8 
..Oct. 29 
-Dec. 10 

..Oct. 15 



June 11 
...Jan. 8 

May 21 

.Mar. 19 

...July 9 
.Feb. 12 
...Apr. 2 
.Jan. 29 



1928 

Across the Atlantic —Blue-Murphy Feb. 25 

Beware of Married Men— Irene Rich Jan. 14 

City of Sin, The Loy-Miljan-Wong 

Jazz Singer, The Al Jolson Oct. 22 

Lion and the Mouse, The..L. Barrymore. 

Little Snob, The May McAvoy Feb. 11 

Powder My Back (C) Rich-Ferris Mar. 10 

Race for Life _ Rin-Tin-Tin _ Jan. 28 

Rinty of the Desert Rin-Tin-Tin Dec 10 

Tenderloin Dolores Costello 



1928 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



49 



LETTERS 
From Readers 

A forum at which the exhibitor is 
invited to express his opinion on 
matters of current interest. Brevity 
adds forcefulness to any statement. 
Unsigned letters will not be printed. 



Suggests Big Theme for Film 

ARIASA, MICH.— To the Editor: New 
Year's greeting to the staf¥. It's been quite 
a spell since I have contributed anything to 
the Herald, which I am pleased to note has 
now been combined with the World. Mr. 
Quigley is to be complimented on this merger 
and the trade as well. 

Business has been quiet for the past year 
and so I have not been so busy that I couldn't 
sit back and review the march of the industry, 
reading much in the trade papers on the lines 
as well as between. 

Ill my humble opinion (with apologies to 
William Randolph Hearst) the industry has 
produced no outstanding picture since "The 
Birth of a Nation," with the single exception 
of "The Ten Commandments," which has 
had that something in human appeal as either 
of these. Just why this is true, at least to me, 
I haven't been able to figure out unless it is 
because the producers have been too busy 
with mass production on a lot of program 
subjects, some of which were labelled specials 
and ballyhooed as $2 toppers on Broadway. 

What follows herewith is something that 
has been on my chest for some time and I 
am passing it on for what it is worth. Per- 
chance it may give someone in the industry 
something that should prove to be the out- 
standing achievement of the industry for all 
time. 

Produce a picture using the second coming 
of Christ as the theme. Scriptural references 
will show that the world (and by this is meant 
the planet Earth) is now traveling in that 
general direction with a wide-open throttle. 
If such a theme is correctly handled it will 
make a big, lasting smash as a picture with a 
tremendous human appeal and at the same 
time serve as a good influence upon our fel- 
low creatures who are or are becoming caref- 
less or neglectful of the fact that the Kingdom 
of Christ will not always be in the offing. 

Just when this will occur, of course, no 
one can tell. Nevertheless, the Scriptures will 
reveal with just ordinary perusal that many 
of the prophecies therein recorded are ripe 
for fulfilment. 

The industry needs a picture of this type. 
No less does the world need it. 

Who would I pick to produce it? After 
careful consideration I would select Cecil B. 
DeMille. D. W. Griffith would be my second 
choice. This is no reflection on D. W.'s abil- 
ity nor my opinion of his ability. 

Such an undertaking would be beset with 
problems but these would fade into insignifi- 
cance when compared with the tremendous 
success that would attend the production of 
this supreme cinema achievement. 

I know that some of my fellow exhibitors 
will smile and say, "Pete's got religion." Not 
any more than before and I'm a darn long 
way from being a saint. I'm only an ornery 
sinner like the rest of you, but the Scriptures 
are open to anyone who chooses to read and 
if you think I'm off my trolley just take and 
blow the dust off the old family Bible and 
"Search ye the Scriptures." Then after you 
have studied the Works you will probably 
develop some ideas of how this job should be 
put across. 

The whole matter lends itself to endless 
possibilities and by the same token it may 
be rendered worthless unless caution is used 
^yith strict Scriptural interpretations. There 
lies the secret of the success or failure of 
such a picture. 

I am anxious to see your first issue of the 



combined Herald and World. It has been 
my pleasure to read both of these papers for 
some time. The Herald, however, has been 
my old standby and for that reason I am glad 
that the combination will be under the leader- 
ship of Mr. Quigley. 

With kind regards and best wishes for the 
New Year. — Pioneer Pete, Pioneer Theatre, 
Amasa, Mich. 



Now You've Started, Keep Up 

MENARD, TEX.— To the Editor : Happy 
New Year, Herald, and congratulations on the 
new and combined Herald-World that will 
serve us this year and many more to come. 

Haven't reported or written for a long time. 
Been just too darn busy. Notice where J. C. 
Jenkins is at last heading for Texas, hope he 
doesn't pass us up even if we never have writ- 
ten any poetry to the paper. Maybe his car 
will be named Colleen after he reads the cur- 
rent surveys just published. 

Wonder how many of the boys used the 
situation of Christmas and New Year's fall- 
ing on Sundays to try out their towns on the 
Sunday question? We did here. First time I 
ever ran Sunday shows. Most favorable com- 
ment in general. Most people wanted to know 
why we didn't keep it up. 

Seems to me pictures as a whole have kept 
on a higher entertainment level than ever be- 
fore. Maybe I'm just too optimistic, but really 
there are fewer poor ones than usual, even 
though I read plenty of howls in the depart^ 
ment from time to time. Nineteen twenty-eight 
will doubtless bring about as many changes as 
the past year, Metro's advertising continues 
to be the worst and First National's the best 
on the market, rentals will try to reach higher 
levels, everybody will make bigger and yet 
bigger and better film. We poor chaps will 
make less and less, or do we? 

Very best wishes to everybody in the office 
of THE trade paper. — Henry Reeve, Mission 
theatre, Menard, Tex. 



List of Theatres 
in St. Louis 



{Continued from page 15) 

ville. 87. Orpheum, 2,128. Pictures and Or- 
pheum vaudeville. 88. St. Louis, 3,881. Pic- 
tures and Orpheum vaudeville. 89. Brid|,e, 
700. Closed. 

90. Criterion, 892. George Pleakos. 91. 
Chouteau, 235. T. Kitchoff. Airdome seats 
500. 92. Eighteenth street, 368. W. O. Reeve. 
Airdome seats 650. 93. Fairy, 770. Maurj' 
Reichman. Airdome seats 796. 94. Famous, 
373. Closed. 95. Gem, 596. James M. Drake. 

96. Arcade. Airdome, 1,764. James Drake. 

97. Hudson, 590. Harry Worack. 98. Hickory, 
234. Closed. 99. Ivanhoe, 690. Fred Hoff- 
man. 100. Kickerbocker, 596. Knickerbocker 
Amusement Co. Airdome seats 800. 101. 
Macklind, 800. B. J. Leukin. 102. Marquette, 
795. Frank Speros. 103. Maryland, 500. 
W. O. Reeva. Airdome seats 925. 104. Mel- 
vin, 576. Christ Zotos. 105. Monroe. 250. 
Closed. Airdome seats 1,350. 106. Movie. 26'^. 
J. P. Murphy. 107. McNair, 607. J. Kotnik. 
Airdome seats 700. 

108. Merry Widow, 250. P. J. Murphy. 
109. Monarch, 320. P. J. Murphy. 110. New 
Family, 682. G. Lange. 111. New Liberty, 
379. George Endler. 112. Pauline, 783. C. A. 
Kalbfell. Airdome seats 1,100. 113. Venus. 
492. A. Sanowsky. 114. Pestalozzi, 577. 
Laura Camp. Airdome seats 800. 115 Plaza, 
735. Maury Slahl. 116. Palm, 901. Sanford 
Amusement Co. 117. Queens. 601. William 
Goldman. Airdome seats 730. 118. Robin, 
640. F. Calhoun. 

* • * 

119. Roosevelt, 646. Christ Zotos. 120. 
Star, 521. C. Efthin. 121. Wilson, 283. P Xz 
Rybaki. 122. Yale, 575. Closed. 123. Union 
Station, 300. J. Miller. 124. Embassy, 839. 
H. Paszemoglu. Airdome seats 1,380. 125. 
Southampton, 738. Closed. 126. Irma, 250. 
Tom Creeley, owner-manager. Airdome seats 
500. 127. Kirkwood, 500. Frank Wa-ner, 
owner-manager. Airdome seats 1,000. 128. 
Wellsten, Wellston, Mo., 2,100. We'Iston 
Amusement Co. 129. Community, Overland. 
Mo., 700. J. Johnson, owner. 130. Overland, 
Overland, Mo., 800. Robinson. 131. St. 
John's Hall, Florissant, Mo., 300. F. Costello. 
132. Gem, St. John's Station, Mo., 500. Harry 
Halloway. 133. Odeon, 1,914. Sometimes 
plays special pictures. Henri Chouteau. 



St. Louis Setting 
Seat Record 

{Continued from page 15) 

seats, and after that the worry of the man- 
agement ceased. The projection machines 
were placed on a wooden platform near 
the entrance and no effort was made to fire- 
proof the operator's booth. Later the build- 
ing department banned the tents and forced 
the erection of brick and concrete houses. 

St. Louis also pioneered in motion pic- 
ture production. O. T. Crawford, who had 
opened a film exchange here in 1907, con- 
ceived the idea of making pictures for ex- 
hibition in his own theatres. Eddie Dustin 
was his righthand man. Crawford built 
such houses as the Novelty, Union, Kings, 
Bremen and Shenandoah. 

Skouras Brothers Start in 1914 

Skouras Brothers Enterprises, which op- 
erates more motion picture theatres in St. 
Louis than any other organization, was 
started in 1914, but not under that name. 
In that year Spyros and Charles Skouras 
purchased a half interest in the Olympia at 
1420 Market street. The theatre was in- 
corporated for $20,000. Today Skouras 
Brothers Enterprises is interested directly 
or indirectly in 38 theatres in St. Louis and 
St. Louis county, with 52,974 seats and in 
19 airdomes seating 31,878. Six of their 
theatres are closed at present. 

While in 1906 it cost but $75 a week to 
operate, the present day first-run palaces 
such as Skouras' Ambassador and Missouri, 
Loew's State and the St. Louis theatre have 
weekly expenses of upwards of $20,000 and 
on the year must take in more than $1,000,- 
000 each before they can figure on any 
profit. 



Still Have Hope for 
Government Help in 
Far East Film Trade 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 10.— Authorization 
for employment by the department of com- 
merce of a motion picture trade commissioner 
for the Far East has been refused by the 
House appropriations committee, and no fund 
for that work appears specifically in the de- 
partment's appropriation bill. However, the 
funds for the department are increased under 
the general heading of "promoting^ commerce," 
and if a specific item is not put into the bill 
on the floor of the House and Senate, it may 
still be possible, it is thought, for the bureau 
of foreign and domestic commerce to under- 
take this work. 

Besought by a large number of business 
representatives to make provision for various 
trade investigations, the committee declared 
that much of this work should be conducted 
by trade organizations. 

The need for a film trade representative in 
the Far East was laid before the committee 
by Burt New, Washington representative of 
the Hays; organization, and Dr. Julius Klein, 
director of the bureau of foreign and domes- 
tic commerce. 

It was pointed out by Dr. Klein that among 
the problems facing the trade in the Far East 
are a 25 per cent gross: production tax under 
consideration in New South Wales and the 
Australian provision that 2,(XX) British films 
must be shown at each place. In India a com- 
mittee is working on film legislation that will 
restrict business, and Japan and the Dutch 
East Indies are likewise engaged in efforts 
to a curtailment of American films, said Dr. 
Klein. 



50 



EXfflBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



CLASSIFIED 
Advertising 

Ten cents per word, payable in advance. Minimum charge, 
$1.00. Copy and checks should be addressed Classified Ad 
Dept. Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World, 407 So.- 
Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

The Recognized National Classified Advertising Medium 




Theatre For Sale 



FOR SALE — ^Theatre, modern brick building, good 
equipment. Two hundreds seats. Seven-day Ohio 
town, eighteen hundred population. Doing good busi- 
ness. Best small town in state. Price $12,000. Ad- 
dress Box 232, Exhibitors Herald, 407 S. Dearborn 
St., Chicago, 111. 



For Sale 



DEEP SEA wonders and curiosities for pit shows 
— Stuffed Fish and Alligators. Send for catalog. Ad- 
dress Joseph Fleischman, 1105 Franklin, Tampa, 
Florida. 



Theatre Wanted 



BUY OR LEASE— Theatre in town over S.OOO. 
Prefer Ohio or Indiana. Open or closed. Address de- 
tails to Box 55, St. Marys, Ohio. 



Stationery 



NEARGRAVUREMBOSO Process printed station- 
ery, distinctive special 250 letterheads and envelopes 
type embossed $5.55 cash, postpaid. Samples. Ad- 
dress Sollidays, Knox, Indiana. 



Position Wanted 



THEATRE ORGANIST at liberty would like to 
get connected with a reliable house. Will go any- 
where. Address M. R. Waddell, 129 Forest Ave., 
Dalton, 111. 

OPERATOR — wishes steady position with a reliable 
house, 18 years experience. Married, reliable, best 
of references. Address Fred T. Walker, 6247 Black- 
stone St., Chicago, 111. 

THEATRE ORGANIST — Experinced on all 
makes. Go any place. Mabel Young, Plaza Hotel, 
North Ave. and North Clark St., Room 212-B, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

ORGANISTS thoroughly trained and experienced 
in theatre work. Men and women now ready for 
good positions. Union or nonunion. Write salary 
and other data. Address, Chicago Musical College, 
64 £. Van Buren, Chicago. 

PROJECTIONIST, 15 years' experience, desires 
connection with reputable chain. Complete repair 
shop enables me to keep equipment in A-1 condition. 
Rewind own motors and generators. Can save $s 
for any employer. Married, non-union, sober, reli- 
able. Address Box 229, Exhibitors Herald, 407 S. 
Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

MANAGER as operator, 15 years experience, can, 
and am willing to do anything in the theatre, mar- 
ried, 38 years old. Address Mr. O. R. Haus, 
Hastings, Minn. 



WANTED — Position as Moving Picture O perator. 
Thirteen years experience. Wire at once, stating 
salary. David S. Mayo, Box 272, Bowdon, Georgia. 

ORGANIST — Conservatory and movie s chool grad- 
uate. Will work for reasonable salary on good organ 
for experience. Address Miss Beulah Tripp, 1302 
Avenue G, Ft. Madison, Iowa. 

THEATRE ORGANIST— Good at c ueing pictures, 
and novelty solos. Will go anywhere. Address Ed- 
ward Schulis, 7329 S. Marshfield Ave., Chicago, 111. 



Wanted to Buy 



PANATROPE or ORTHOPHONIC; must be a 
late model, in good condition and a bargain. 
Address Crockett Brown, Nashwauk, Minn. 



Gift Night Souvenirs 

GIFT NIGHT MERCHANDISE: Over 300 fine 
novelties in our large free catalog at genuine whole- 
sale prices. Write today. No obligation. Address 
Fair Trading Co., Inc., 307 Sixth Ave., New York. 



Organs for Sale 



SMITH UNIT THEATRE ORGANS: Factory 
rebuilt. Also Wiu-litzers, Bartolas and Seeburg Pitz 
Organs. All factory rebuilt. Address Perfection 
Theatre Equipment Company, 711 Wells Street, Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. 

FOR SALE: Bartola Pipe Organ. Used Wurlitzer 
Pipe Organ, model U, very reasonable. Cremona 
Pipe Organ used or new Reproduco Pipe Organs. 
Address S. B. McFadden, Havana, Illinois. 



Projector Repairing 

BEST REPAIR SHOP in the country for over- 
hauling and repairing projection machines, ticket 
machines, motors, etc. Expert workmanship, prompt 
service, reasonable prices. Movie Supply Company, 
844 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 



Mailing Lists 



21,000 MOVING PICTURE THEATRES showing 
population and seating capacity in most cases. Price 
$6 per M. or $50 for the complete list. 2,100 chain 
theatres operating from 2 to 150 theatres @ $22 per 
M. 1,043 Film Exchanges @ $10 per M. 222 Manu- 
facturers of studios @ $4 per M. 452 Moving Picture 
Machine and Supply Dealers @ $8.50 per M. All 
guaranteed 97% correct. Address Trade Circular 
Company, 166 W. Adams Street, Chicago, Illinois. 



Equipment Wanted 

WE PAY BEST prices for used opera chairs, pro- 
jection machines, ventilating fans, portable projec- 
tors, etc. Movie Supply Company, 844 South Wabash 
Avenue, Chicago. 



Equipment for Sate 



HIGH GRADE, GUARANTEED USED EQUIP- 
MENT at very reasonable prices. All makes of mo- 
tion picture machinery such as Simplex, Powers, 
Motiograph projectors, Powers high intensity arc 
lamps, compensators of all kinds, motors, and Mazda 
regulators. Also first class overhauling done on all 
kinds of motion picture equipment. An inquiry will 
bring a prompt quotation. It pays to investigate. Ad- 
dress Joseph Spratler, 12-14 E. 9th St., Chicago, 111. 

CHICAGO CLEARING HOUSE for Second Hand 
Equipment. Seats, Rebuilt projectors of all makes. 
Screens, Pianos, Organs and other miscellaneous 
articles for the theatre. Address Illinois Theatre 
Equipment Company, 12-14 E. 9th Street, Chicago, 
Illinois. 



COMPLETE THEATRE EQUIPMENT including 
500 opera chairs, two Simplex Projectors, Martin 
Rotary Converter, Screen, Ticket Selling Machine, 
Lightning Changer, Ticket Chopper, etc. Address Box 
111, Exhibitors Herald, Chicago. 



Chairs for Sale 



320 — Upholstered chairs. Every back and seat 
newly upholstered in Blue Spanish Leather. Very 
low price and quick shipment. C. G. Demel, 845 S. 
State St., Chicago, 111. 

2,000 — Brand new veneer opera chairs, finished in 
Gray, Mahogany and Walnut. These chairs only 
slightly higher than used ones and are very rare bar- 
gains. Exact photo and full details submitted in first 
letter. Please state number of chairs required. C. G. 
Demel, 845 S. State St., Chicago, 111. 

FOR SALE — Used Theatre chairs, always a stock 
on hand, also veneer seats, write your requirements. 
Address Theatre Seating Co., 845 S. State St., 
Chicago, 111. 



Help Wanted 



WANTED — First class mechanic and motion picture 
equipment repair man, thoroughly experienced on 
Simplex, Powers and Motiograph. Good salary, splen- 
did position and wonderful opportunity for right 
party. References required. Address Box 231, Ex- 
hibitors Herald, 407 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

WANTED PARTNER to manage one of chain the- 
atres. Must have $5,000; good p reposition. Oppor- 
tunity to own further interests. Address Box 26, 
Keene, N. H. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



51 



WHAT THE PICTURE DID FOR ME 

Verdicts on Films in Language of Exhibitor 



Copyright, 1928 

Incorporated in this original exhibitors report department of Exhibitors Herald, which was estab- 
lished October 14, 1916, is the Moving Picture World department, "'Straight from the Shoulder 

Reports." 



FBO 

THE MOJAVE KID: Bob Steele— 10%. Decembei 
30. Dandy picture. Steele will be a good one soon 
if they give him good Etuff to work in. Five reels. — 
Rudolf Duba, Royal theatre, Kimball, S. D. — General 
patronage. 

THE MOJAVE KID: Bob Steele— This is a very 
good Western. Drew good and eeemed to satisfy. 
Steele is very promieing, if the rest of his pictures 
are as good as this one. Six reels. — Dewey L. Kieor, 
Sterling theatre, Fairmont, Neb. — Small town patron- 
age. 

TERROR OF BAR X: Bob Custer— 70%. Fair 
Western. Not much action until the last, but seeme 
to hold Interest. Five reels. — W. U. Shelnutt, City 
theatre, LaFayette, Ala. — General patronage. 

CYCLONE OF THE RANGE: Tom Tyler— 
A very good Tyler picture but didn't seem to 
draw as good as some others. Played two 
nights to very small houses and lost money. — 
W. C. Snyder, Cozy theatre, Lamont, Okla. — 
General patronage. 

CYCLONE OF THE RANGE: Tom Tyler— 25%. 
December 9-10. Another good Tyler picture with lit- 
tle Frankie Darrow doing his part in a commend- 
able way. Played two nights to very small houses 
and didn't make expenses. Five reels. — W. C. Sny- 
der, Cozy theatre, Lamont, Okla. — -General patronage. 

FLAMING FURY: Ranger— 36%. December 23-24. 

I believe that this is' the best Ranger picture that we 
have played. The dog was kept busy doing some- 
thing all through the picture and that is what my 
patrons like. Played two nights to small houses, 
due to Christmas entertainments, and made just a 
little above expenses. Five reels. — W. C. Snyder, 
Cozy theatre, Lamont, Okla. — General patronage. 

BRED IN OLD KENTUCKY: Viola Dana 
— ^An interesting picture. Not very much ac- 
tion, however. Did only a fair business on 
this one. — Ray P. Murphy, Old Trail theatre, 
Hebron, O. — General patronage. 

SPLITTING THE BREEZE: Tom Tyler— 40%. 
Very good but the kids sure missed little Frankie. 
Five reels. — W. U. Shelnutt, City theatre, LaFayette, 
Ala. — General patronage. 

SILVER COMES THROUGH: Fred Thomson— 
45%. November 25-26. Another good Thomson pic- 
ture and pleased nearly everyone who saw it. Played 
two nights to fair houses and made some money. Six 
reels. — W. C. Snyder, Cozy theatre, Lamont, Okla. — 
General patronage. 

THE SONORA KID: Special cast— Very 
good outdoori picture. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, 
Elite theatre, Placerville, Cal. — General pat- 
ronage. 

SILVER COMES THROUGH— Fred Thomson— 
18% December 23-24. Good show. Just like all his 
other pictures, plenty of action, and Silver sure is 
the lead of the cast. Well, Fred, one more from 
FRO and then the price goes up on the Paramounts 
luul maybe you'll not make as good a hit as you did 



Editor's Note 

Percentage ratings given by ex- 
hibitors in reports to this depart- 
ment are obtained in the following 
manner: Average daily gross of 
picture reported is divided by 
average daily gross of picture hold- 
ing house record to determine rela- 
tive box office value in terms of 
percentage. 

EXAMPLE: $75 (average daily 
gross of picture reported) divided 
by $100 (average daily gross of 
picture holding house record) 
equals .75 (percentage rating given 
picture in report) . 

When a picture has received 
percentage ratings in 10 reports it 
is entered in THE BOX OFFICE 
TICKER with its current gross 
average indicating relative attrac- 
tion values of pictures listed there- 
in. 

THE BOX OFFICE TICKER 
appears on page 57. 



before. Good luck, Fred. Six reels. — Rudolf Duba, 
Royal theatre, Kimball, S. D. — General patronage. 

THE SONORA KID: Tom Tyler— 25%. December 
31. A good action picture, but Tyler missed his pal, 
Frankie Darrow. Kids disappointed. — Bert Silver. 
Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General pat- 
ronage. 

SILVER COMES THROUGH: Fred Thom- 
son — Another good one from Thomson and 
went over gooA. Played two nights to fair 
houses and came out some to the good. Have 
one more to play and then, I suppose, it's 
good-bye to Fred and Silver. — W. C. Snyder, 
Oozy theatre, Lamont, Okla. — General pat- 
ronage. 

MOULDERS OF MEN: Special cast— 50%. De- 
cember 28. This is a wonderful picture. More of a 
special than most socalled specials. Story great. 
Conway Tearle good. Frankie Darrow wonderful. 
Rex Lease and Margaret Morris fine. I played the 
picture as a program picture one day. If you haven't 
played it buy it and play it three days. It will give 
100 per cent satisfaction to people that want real en- 
tertainment, clean and interesting. — Bert Silver, Sil- 



ver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General pat- 
ronage. 

CAUFORNIA OR BUST: George O'Hara— 30%. 
December 20. A fine little picture and went over 
in fine shape to a small house. Had vaudeville with 
this one and didn't get enough out of it to pay ex- 
penses. Five reels. — W. C. Snyder, Cozy theatre, 
Lamont, Okla. — General patronage. 

THE HARVESTER: Special cast— Gene Stratton 
Porter's name drew what few we got, but was 
stormed out the second night. It did not please as 
well as her other works. Seven reels. — Dewey L. 
Kisor, Sterling theatre, Fairmont, Neb. — Small town 
patronage. 

BREED OF THE SEA: Special cast- 
Peter B. Kyne's stories always good and so is 
this picture. Poor box office receipts but no 
fault of the picture. — M. M. Haymans, Dream- 
land theatre, Metter, Ga. — General patronage. 

THE HARVESTER: Special cast— We have a job 
in this business in trying to please them all, and this 
picture does not begin to complete the job. The 
folks who made this picture tried hard enough but the 
story they had to work with does not measure up to 
present day demands. Love scenes are too slushy and 
the younger set will titter right out loud at the 
stuff, while on the other hand the older patrons will 
tell you it is a good picture. So there you have it. 
The one likes it and the other does not. It does not 
have near the drawing power that other books of 
this writer have. Seven reels. — W. H. Brenner, Cozy 
theatre, Winchester, Ind. — General patronage. 

SHANGHIED: Special cast — December 30. Small 
town exhibitors be on your guard. This is a story 
of Frisco's Barbary Coast ; of booze, wild women and 
sea rats. The moral tone is very bad. It cei-tainly 
gives the reformers a good chance to yell for cen- 
sorship. A few more like this, and they'll get it. 
Seven reels. — E. M. Biddle, Strand theatre, Paoli, Ind. 
— Small town patronage. 

DON MIKE: Fred Thomson— Something different 
from the average Thomson, and seemed to please a 
little better. Did not draw as good as usual. Five 
i-eels. — Dewey L. Kisor, Sterling theatre, Fairmont, 
Neb. — Small town patronage. 

First National 

ROSE OF THE GOLDEN WEST: Gilbert Roland- 
Mary Astor — 50%. January 1-2. This is a good pic- 
ture. Stars and cast fine. Story history, making a 
satisfactory entertainment to our audience. Gave 
satisfaction. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

HER WILD OAT: Colleen Moore— 10%. January 

1. Fifteen below zero when I played this so I lost 
money. However, it is a typical Moore picture and 
will please her fans. Some patrons say that her pic- 
tures are all alike, starts as a poor girl of the 
streets and climbs to the top too often. Seven reels. 
— H. J. Eagan, American theatre, Wautoma, Wis. — 
Small town patronage. 

NO PLACE TO GO: Mary Astor-Lloyd Hughes— 
15%: December 31. A pretty fair program picture. 



Reports indented and printed in bold face are those contributed by members of Van's Gang, who reported 
to "Straight from the Shoulder Reports" in Moving Picture World prior to the merger. 



52 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



A good cast of actors and you expect a little more 
than you get in this one. Seven reels. — H. J. Eagan, 
American theatre, Wautoma, Wis. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

THE DROP KICK: Richard Barthelmcss— 
Had a fair crowd the first night. Second 
night terrible. Sort of far fetched, but, of 
course, the old football game is won in the 
last minutes so the kids said it was okey. — 
H. L. Brown, Grande theatre. Port Allegany, 
Pa. — General patronage. 

NO PLACE TO GO: Mary Astor-Lloyd Hughes. 
I have had the pleasure to see Mary Astor in many 
photoplays, but she never proved herself as capable 
as in "Rose of the Golden West" and her last one, 
"No Place to Go." This little picture is not credited 
by many as being anything worthwhile, but my pat- 
rons liked it better than anything I have had to offer 
in quite a spell, so you may know if my patrons liked 
it yours will like it also. Book it for a long run. 
Seven reels. — W. H. Brenner, Cozy theatre, Winches- 
ter, Ind. — General patronage. 

McFADDEN'S FLATS: Murray-Conklin— 52%. De- 
cember 8. Still very cold. Picture is very enter- 
taining. Conklin forgot to shut off the light in the 
barber shop part of the time when he was not 
using it, after the director had closeup of him doing 
so. The Scotch economy brought a hearty laugh, 
however. — ^H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, 
S. C. — Small town patronage. 

BROADWAY NIGHTS: Lois Wilson— A 
very good program picture that pleased fairly 
welj to the few that came out to sec it. 
However, made a little above expenses. — 
W. C. Snyder, Cozy theatre, Lamont, Okla. — 
General patronage. 

BROADWAY NIGHTS: Lois Wilson— 30%. De- 
cember 2-3. A fine little program picture and, I 
think, pleased most everyone. Played two nights to 
small houses- but came out a little to the good. Seven 
reels. — W. C. Snyder, Cozy theatre, Lamont, Okla. — 
General patronage. 

THE DEVIL'S SADDLE: Ken Maynard— 44%. 
December 15. Second of Maynard'e pictures, and as 
good as the first, but rain kept our folks away. — ^H. 
B. Grioe, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, S. C— Small 
town patronage. 

SOMEWHERE IN SONORA: Ken Maynard— 25%. 
November 18-19. A very good Western and seemed to 
please the few that came out. The Maynard pictures 
are good but don't draw here as they should for some 
reason. Six reels. — ^W. C. Snyder, Cozy theatre, La- 
mont, Okla. — General patronage. 

SOMEWHERE IN SONORA: Ken Maynard 
— ^A dandy Western picture that pleased the 
majority of ray patrons. Played two nights 
to very small houses and didn't make expenses. 
Maynard doesn't draw here like he should, 
for some reason. — W. C. Snyder, Cozy thea- 
tre, Lamont, Okla. — General patronage. 

THE SEA TIGER: Milton Sills— 37%. December 
16-17. A good picture of the Sill's type and pleased 
nearly everyone who saw it. Played two nights to 
fair houses and came out a little to the good. Six 
reels. — W. C. Snyder, Cozy theatre, Lamont, Okla. — 
General patronage. 

THE LOST WORLD: Special cast— 64%. Novem- 
ber 24. Sure thrilled them all right. Wonderful pic- 
ture. Carnival opposition. — H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills 
theatre, Bath, S. C. — ^Small town patronage. 

BABE COMES HOME: Babe Ruth— December 27- 
28. This is a dandy little program picture and 
whether your patrons are baseball fans or not, it will 
please. There is not much baseball in it. As a mat- 
ter of fact it is mostly comedy. This is a heluva 
time of the year to run a baseball picture, but stuck 
it in now as a lot of the Fair Haired Boys were 
home from Collitch. Miss Nilsson and Louise Fa- 
zenda are in the cast, and Babe can act like an old 
trouper. Six reels. — Wra. E. Tragsdorf, Trags thea- 
tre, Neillsville, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

THE LIVE WIRE: Johnny Hines — Good 
comedy drama. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, Elite 
theatre, Placcrville, Cal. — General patronage. 

CONVOY: Special cast — December 26. Very good 
war story and will go over unless your patrons do not 
like war pictures. Did good business here for two 
days. Reports from patrons very favorable. — Wm. 
L. Crouse, Ideal theatre, Bloomer, Wis. — General pat- 
ronage. 

THE TENDER HOUR: Special cast— December 25. 
Good picture with big scenes and plenty of thrills. 
Would not call it a special, but better than the 
average program. — ^Wm. L. Crouse, Ideal theatre, 
Bloomer, Wis. — General patronage. 



KIKI: Noima Talmadge — Did not make as good as 
some of her pictures. Seven reels. — Giacoma Bros., 
Crystal theatre. Tombstone, Ariz. — General patronage. 

THE TEXAS STEER: Will Rogers— December 
28-29. You are bound to be disappointed when you 
see this picture as it doesn't come up to what you 
expect, but if you get behind it, it's there at the 
B. O. Be sure you mention titles by Will Kbgers. 
Eight reels. — John L. Damm, Strand theatre. Wads- 
worth, O. — General patronage. 

MEMORY LANE: Special cast— A poor box 
office bet. Good picture. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, 
Elite theatre, Placcrville, Cal. — Genera] pat- 
ronage. 

THE STRONG MAN: Harry Langdon— November 
22. Not much of a drawing card here. — A. J. Wal- 
lace, Pacific Community Association theatre, Colum- 
bia, S. C. — General patronage. 

PASSION: Negri-Jannings — A French costume 
picture. Story during time of Louis the XIV. Will 
not please but it will draw providing it is exploited 
right. A reissue. Picture should be run on an off 
night. — A. G. Miller, Lyric theatre, Atkinson, Neb. — 
General patronage. 



Fox 



PAID TO LOVE: Virginia Valli-George O'Brien— 
69%. December 26. One of the best pictures I've ever 
had the pleasure of showing, plenty of pep and. Oh 
Boy I that Valli, she's there — looks better every day. 
Step on this and make some dough. — -T. W. Cannon, 
Majestic theatre, Greenfield, Tenn. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

TUMBUNG RIVER: Tom Mix— 75%. Mix prod- 
uct better this year, if you can judge by this one. 
Six reels. — T. W. Cannon, Majestic theatre, Green- 
ville, Tenn. — Small town patronage. 

THE COUNTRY BEYOND: Olive Borden 
— Good picture, wonderful scenery. It has 
everything one would want to make a good 
film. — H. W. Batchelder, Gait theatre. Gait, 
Cal. — Small town patronage. 

PAJAMAS: Olive Borden — 46%. Quite spicy but 
no one seemed to object. All said they liked it. Six 
reels. — T. W. Cannon, Majestic theatre, Greenville, 
Tenn. — Small town patronage. 

THE BRONCO TWISTER: Tom Mix— 40%. Good 
Western. Mix doesn't draw for me like some exhibi- 
tors report he does for them. Don't know why as 
this is good town for Westerns. Five reels. — W. U. 
Shelnutt, City theatre, LaFayette, Ala. — General pat- 
ronage. 

FIG LEAVES: Olive Borden— A good pro- 
gram picture. — ^Mrs. J. B. Travelle, Elite thea- 
tre, Placerville, CaL — General patronage. 

NO MAN'S GOLD: Tom Mix— 96%. December 23. 
Print was bad, but picture was the best Mix I've 
ever seen. — T. W. Cannon, Majestic theatre, Green- 
field, Tenn. — Small tovra patronage. 

DESERT VALLEY: Buck Jones— 82%. December 
17. Another good one from Buck. This boy should 
watch his step or he'll go the way Fred Thomson is 
going. Paramount can kill 'em as fast as they are 
made. — T. W. Cannon, Majestic theatre, Greenfield, 
Tenn. — Small town patronage. 

THE RETURN OF PETER GRIMM: Alec 
B. Francis — Very good picture. — Mrs. J. B. 
Travelle, Elite theatre, Placerville, Cal. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

HIGH SCHOOL HERO: Sally Phipps— This came 
as rather of a surprise. It is one of the cleanest 
and best comedies that we have had the pleasure of 
running for some time. It is minus the mushy love 
scenes, and the famous clinch at the end. Step on 
it, it will please. Seven reels. — Dewey L. Kisor, 
Sterling theatre, Fairmont, Neb. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

ARIZONA WILDCAT: Tom Mix— My first one of 
Mix. This drew fair, and seemed to please. Makes 
a good Saturday program. Six reels. — Dewey L. 
Kisor, Sterling theatre, Fairmont, Neb. — Small town 
patronage. 

THE MUSIC MASTER: Alec B. Francis— 
An exceptionally good picture. Tie up with 
music stores when you run this one. Print 
good. — Stephen G. Brenner, New Eagle thea- 
tre, Baltimore, Md. — General patronage. 

IS ZAT SO?: George O'Brien: Very good cast 
and seemed to pull many laughs out of patrons. 
Makes a good regular program picture, that and noth- 
ing more. Seven reels. — -Giacoma Bros., Crystal thea- 
tre. Tombstone, Ariz. — General patronage. 

WHAT PRICE GLORY: Special cast— This Is a 



real picture for its kind. It is plenty hot in places, 
and will probably draw a little criticism, but it's 
worth stepping on. You will have to sell it to the 
public, as you will all Pox pictures. Eleven reels. — 
Dewey L. Kisor, Sterling theatre, Fairmont, Neb. — 
Small town patronage. 

THREE BAD MEN: Special cast— A spe- 
cial. Many liked it as well as "The Covered 
Wagon." Did not draw at 10-35 cents. Will 
please if you can get them in. — H. V. Ritter, 
McDonald theatre, McDonald, Kan. — Small 
town patronage. 

THREE BAD MEN: Special cast^Very good.— A. 
J. Wallace, Pacific Community Association theatre, 
Columbia, S. C. — General patronage. 



Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

SPRING FEVER: William Haines— 15%. Decem- 
ber 28. This pleased a great deal more than I ex- 
pected it would. Not having many golf players here 
I didn't expect any favorable comments but it seemed 
to please quite generally. Seven reels. — ^H. J. Bagan, 
American theatre, Wautoma, Wis. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

ROOKIES: Dane- Arthur — Good comedy 
drama. — ^Mrs. J. B. Travelle, Elite theatre, 
Placcrville, Cal. — General patronage. 

THE FAIR CO-ED: Marion Davies— 38%. A 
cracker-jack. Basket ball game makes this one rather 
good. Six reels. — T. W. Cannon, Majestic theatre, 
Greenville, Tenn. — Small town patronage. 

THE FAIR CO-ED: Marion Davies— Mills 
closed down from lack of orders, no market 
for hay, cabbage $4 per ton. Patrons say "no 
gotta da mon." What few we had to see 
Marion seemed pleased. It certainly went over 
big with the kids. Students home from Syra- 
cuse university said it differed a good deal 
from college life in that college. It ought to 
go over well in any community that boasts a 
good high school. — L. E. Parson, Parson's 
Hall, Marcellus, N. Y. — General patronage. 

SLIDE, KELLY. SUDE: William Haines— 43%. 
December 1. Pleased those who came, but rain kept 
them away. A good picture. — ^H. B. Grice, Aiken 
Mills theatre, Bath, S. C. — ^Small town patronage. 

FRISCO SALLY LEVY: Sally O'Neil— 
This was a very good picture. Drew a big 
house. I really think we pulled more laughs 
out of this than the "Callahans." Personally, 
I am better satisfied with it. This more than 
pleased. Tone and print good. No as spe- 
cial. — C. G. Brothers, Grand theatre. Grand 
River, la. — General patronage. 

AFTER MIDNIGHT: Norma Shearer— 40%. Not 
so good as former Shearer pictures, but not punk 
by any means. Pleased all who saw it. Seven 
reels. — T. W. Cannon, Majestic theatre, Greenville, 
Tenn. — Small town patronage. 

CALIFORNIA: Tim McCoy^Good out- 
door picture. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, Elite thea- 
tre, Placerville, Cal. — General patronage. 

TELL IT TO THE MARINES: William Haines— 
25%. December 8. This sure is good but didn't bring 
them out. — T. W. Cannon, Majestic theatre, Green- 
ville, Tenn. — Small town patronage. 

CALIFORNIA: Tim McCoy— McCoy is very 
popular here. Picture well received here. As 
good as any we have played of him. Good 
tone, yes for Sunday, no for special. — C. G. 
Brothers, Grand theatre. Grand River, la. — 
General patronage. 

CALIFORNIA: Tim McCoy— 38%. December 16. 

This proved to be a good picture of the costume 
action type. It's an historical picture. No good for 




AUTOMATIC TICKET REGISTER CORF 



January 14, 1928 



EXfflBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



53 



Western fans. — T. W. Cannon, Majestic theatre, 
Greenfield, Tenn. — Small town patronage. 

THE THIRTEENTH HOUR: Lionel BaiTymore- 
Napoleon — December 10. A very good picture. Spooks 
and everything. One kid yelled in one exciting place 
which sure added to it. I don't see why they didn't 
advertise the dog as be was the whole show and 
people would have come to see him. Seven reels. — 
Virginia Pollard, Auditorium theatre, Nehawka, Neb. 
— Small town patronage. 

THE RED MILL: Marion Davies— A dandy 
comedy, well handled by Miss Davies. Sub- 
titles are very clever. Don't pass this one up. 
It's very entertaining. — Ray P. Murphy, Old 
Trail, Hebron, O. — General patronage. 

THE GARDEN OF ALLAH: Alice Terry— Novem- 
ber 26-27. Had more comments on this than on any 
other, but did not have very good crowd. Considered 
this a good picture, although it didn't have a happy 
ending. Seven reels. — Virginia Pollard, Auditorium 
theatre, Nehawka, Neb. — Small town patronage. 

A LITTLE JOURNEY: Special cast^To 
all exhibitors: You will find in this picture 
an unlimited amount of fan which I think 
will please any audience. — M. H. Haymans, 
Dreamland theatre, Metter, Ga. — General pat- 
ronage. 

TILLIE THE TOILER: Marion Davies— December 
17. Rather good. Disappointed some for some rea- 
son or other. Marion played the part all right, but 
I guess it was the plot that killed it. Seven reels. — 
Virginia Pollard, Auditorium theatre, Nehawka, Neb. 
— Small town patronage. 

THE DEMI-BRIDE: Norma Shearer— Good 
picture but not a feature. Moral tone good, 
suitable for Sunday. Audience appeal fair. — 
Mrs. J. B. Travclle, Elite theatre, Placerville, 
Cal. — General patronage. 

THE ADVENTURER: Tim McCoy— December 3. 
A good Westerner. Tim MoCoy ie all right only some 
think him too old to play this kind of a part. 
Dorothy Sebastian was certainly pretty and wish she 
was still with M-G-M. Five reels. — Virginia Pol- 
lard, Auditorium theatre, Nehawka, Neb. — Small town 
patronage. 

MR. WU: Lon Chancy — Not a small town 
picture. Too draggy. Would not have 
played it if I had a chance to see it before- 
hand. — Ray P. Murphy, Old Trail theatre, 
Hebron, O. — General patronage. 

THE FRONTIERSMAN: Tim McCoy— December 
17. A really good picture. The real story of the 
United States. Good appeal, good scenes and very 
interesting. — George Lodge, Green Lantern theatre, 
Claymont, Del. — General patronage. 

THE UNKNOWN: Lon Chaney— All Lon Chaney's 
go over well here. — A. J. Wallace, Pacific Community 
Association theatre, Columbia, S. C. — General pa- 
tronage. 

Paramount 

TWO FLAMING YOUTHS: Chester Conklin-iW. C. 
Fields — 60%. Very good comedy. Fields extra good 
and, of course, Chester is there with his part, so 
made a fair show. Six reels. — W. U. Shelnutt, City 
theatre, LaFayette, Ala. — General patronage. 

SENORITA: Bebe Daniels — 40%. December 29. 
A fine entertaining program picture. Star great. 
Pep and lots of it. — ^Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

FIREMAN SAVE MY CHILD: Beery- 
Hatton — A picture with plenty of laughs. 
Pleased the patrons. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, 
Elite theatre, Placerville, Cal. — General pat- 
ronage. 

SENORITA: Bebe Daniels.— Look out, Doug, this 
little lady has it on you when it comes to using the 
sword. Thrill after thrill in this one. — A. J. Wallace, 
Pacific Community Association theatre, Columbia, 
S. C. — General patronage. 

WE'RE ALL GAMBLERS: Thomas Meighan— 
40%. Personally thought this good, but Tom seems 
to have lost his pull here lately. Can't make any 
cash with him now. Seven reels. — W. U. Shelnutt, 
City theatre, LaFayette, Ala. — General patronage. 

ONE WOMAN TO ANOTHER: Florence 
Vidor — Good program picture. — Mrs. J. B. 
Travelle, Elite theatre, PlacervUle, Cal.— Gen- 
eral patronage. 

SWIM, GIRL, SWIM: Bebe Daniels— 60%. Decem- 
ber 22. Very good. Bebe Daniels comedy seems to 
please. Seven reels.— W. U. Shelnutt, City theatre, 
LaFayette, Ala.— General patronage. 



J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum 



Introducing "J. C." 

To those readers of Moving Picture World who have not been readers 
of Exhibitors Herald, the editor of "What the Picture Did for Me" wishes to 
take this opportunity of introducing our ranibling columnist, J. C. Jenkins, 
whose weekly comments on pictures, conditions and personalities are read 
with absorbing interest by exhibitors throughout this and foreign countries. 
"J. C." is a byword among readers of the Herald. Notv zve'll let "J. C." do 
the talking. You'll like him, and swear by him. 

TUCSON, ARIZ., January 1, 1928. 

DEAR HERALD-WORLD: 

If you will notice you'll see that we made it "1928" the first time. Betcba you didn't do 
that. 

Our family took us down to Nogales last Thursday. Nogales is where all the boys go 
quite frequently from Tucson to renew their youth. On this side of the line you can't and 
on the other side you can. We went over on the other side. 

We had dinner in the Cavern Cafe, which is a large room blasted out of solid rock, and 
it is said that at one time it was used as a prison. Betcba it held 'em, too. Geneve 
ordered fried oysters and some other things, Ruth ordered just plain roast beef, and our 
wife and Dana and yours forever ordered cabrilla. We didn't know what cabrilla was, 
but it sounded good, so we ordered it. We supposed that cabrilla was some kind of a 
pepper dish, but it isn't. Wc asked the Mex that waited on us if cabrilla was grown there 
in Mexico, and he looked at us like he thought we were going to start another revolution, 
then he said something that sounded like "comastat mannana kinsawy vamous de casa 
hombre buena dias," and we looked at him and said, "Now look here, Pedro, you call us 
that again and we'll call out the border patrol." We learned later that cabrilla is a fish 
that has its habitat about 150 miles off the coast of California or South Dakota, we didn't 
learn which; anyhow, it was good and we ate so much of it that we've been sickern a 
hound pup ever since and our wife has doped us with Epsom salts, Fen-a-mint, Codliver 
oil, smartweed tea, shoe polish, and she now threatens to try us on horseshoe nails and 
railroad spikes. These Mexican dishes are too much for us followers of the Stars and 
Stripes and Will Rogers, and we were prone to shout, "God bless our United States of 
America, she's some country," until our wife busted in and told us to lay off of that 
Mexican beer and stick to Volstead. The next time we go to Mexico we are going to 
leave our wife at home. There is a chance down there to have a regular time. Wish 
Bill and Jay had been with us. If Tiajuana is anything like the other side of Nogales 
it is no wonder that Hollywood spends most of her time down there. 

Tucson has a population of something like 40,000 when they are all up, but they are 
never all up. About 30,000 of 'em are in bed most of the time, and it is said that this 
climate will cure everything from ingrowing toenails to a chronic desire to elope with 
the hired girl. Our wife wants us to locate here. 

Exhibitors Herald and MoTliig Picture World FUl a Want None Others Do 

We drove out the other evening to call on Harold Bell Wright, for we knew Harold 
would be disappointed when he learned we were in town and didn't call on him, but we 
were confronted with a sign at the entrance to his estate printed in very plain United 
States advising us to keep out. We did; we surmised that Harold was taking a bath and 
didn't want to be disturbed. There is one thing peculiar about these people down here, 
when they are taking a bath they don't care to have visitors. 

We recall taking a bath in "the old swimmin' hole" some years back, which swimming 
hole was right beside the public highway, and our father invited us out to the woodshed 
and we haven't taken a bath since. 

It is no wonder that Harold writes such lovely stories. His estate butts right up against 
the Rincon mountains, whose peaks are covered with snow and whose valleys are carpeted 
with perpetual green, and if this won't start the "muse a ramblin' " then nothing will. 

From the standpoint of beauty we can't hand Arizona very much, but when one sits 
out on the front porch in his shirt sleeves and reads in the daily papers of the blizzards 
sweeping down from Medicine Hat and Neillsville, Wis., he is wont to drive over to 
Nogales and get all bet up and shout, "Hurrah for Arizona." 

We don't know whether it is the altitude and dry climate of Arizona or our close prox- 
imity to Mexico that makes us have a continual headache, but we've had it ever since we 
hit this state. Geneve, in diagnosing our case, says we have located the pain in the wrong 

{Continued on following page) 



SWIM, GIRL, SWIM: Bebe Daniels— November 
29. Like extremely well. — A. J. Wallace, Pacific 
Community Association theatre, Columbia, S. C— 
General patronage. 

TIME TO LOVE: Special cast— Goofy, but 
good. Title somewhat of a drawback for the 
action fans, but was very entertaining. — 
Dwight Grist, Theatorium, Columbia Falls, 
Mont. — General patronage. 

A SOCIAL CELEBRITY: Adolphe Menjou— 59%. 
December 12. Another barber picture, but it pleased 
our crowd all right. — H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills thea- 
tre, Bath, S. C. — Small town patronage. 

THAT'S MY BABY: Douglas MacLean— 57%- 
November 28. Didn't see this one. Carnival opiJosi- 
tion.— H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, S. C— 
Small town patronage. 



THE ROUGH RIDERS: Special cast— This 
is a very good picture representing the time 
of the war in Cuba- A little long but was 
worth running. Played two nights to bad 
weather. Good tone, print. Yes for special 
and Sunday. — C G. Brothers, Grand theatre. 
Grand River, la. — General patronage. 

SO'S YOUR OLD MAN: W. C. Fields— 67%. 
November 21. Fair comedy, but story is not to be 
taken seriously. Keep the roving princess at home. 
— H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, S. C- 
Small town patronage. 

THE PALM BEACH GIRL: Babe Daniels— 30%. 
December 18. Dandy picture from Bebe and if they 
would make them all like this and sell them right we 
would appreciate to do business with Paramount but 
one out of every 10 is good and nine are the bunk. 
That is the way I feel and my patronage shows it 



54 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum 



(Continued from preceding page) 

part of our anatomy, that an empty gourd isn't susceptible to pain. Doggone it, we wish 
she would 'tend to her own business; anyhow, our head feels like everybody had moved 
out and had pulled up the pump, and if you can read this column and still retain your 
sanity you will be admitted to full membership in the Hollywood colony without further 
examination. Out there they accept anything. Doug and Murray arc still there. 

When Freedom from her mountain height 

Unfurled her standard to the air, 
She tore the azure robes of night 

And set a cactus there. 

And we sat down on that durn cactus and didn't see it, and our wife has hunted the house 
over for the tweezers and can't find 'em, and if that won't make a man vote the democratic 
ticket then Al Smith won't stand any more show than a rabbit. 

Did yon ever eat any enchiladas? Well, take our advice and don't do it. Our family 
inveigled us into trying one the other evening and we have been loco ever since. An 
enchilada is what started the Chicago fire. It will start a fire anywhere. It is made out 
of a lot of stuff right out of the oven and wrapped up in something that reminds one of 
a horse blanket, and you are supposed to eat it, blanket and all. We took one mouthful 
and then yelled for the fire department as soon as we could catch our breath, which was 
30 minutes later. Geneve and Ruth lapped theirs up like it was custard pie, but we'll 
have a grudge against Mexico the balance of our life. If President Calles would send an 
enchilada over to John Bull he'd order the fleet to sail the next morning at sunrise. The 
girls and our wife tried to persuade us to try some tortilla and frijoles, but we accused 
them of wanting to cash in on our insurance policy. The moral to this is, when you go 
to Mexico take your grub with you. 

Tomorrow morning we are going to head North for Nebraska, and when we get to 
Neligh and find that the fire department didn't save our golf clubs and fishing outfit we 
are going to petition the city council for their removal. We've bought tickets for their 
annual ball for the last 30 years and feel that we are entitled to some little consideration. 
Betcha those boys did their best just the same. 

^EiUbitors Herald and Moving Picture World Fills a Want Nona Others Do 

Looking back over 1927 we can see where we made a helluvalota mistakes. We have 
been making this same survey for the last 40 years and note the increasing number of 
mudholes we have fallen into as the years have come and gone. We have made New 
Year's resolutions that would make Thomas 0. Service and Eagle Eye Joe ashamed of 
themselves, none of which held good until the Chink delivered our next batch of laundry. 

New Year's resolutions are all right for weak-minded people, but we refuse to be cata- 
logued with that class any further. We remember making a solemn resolve on January 1, 
1868, to wash our neck and ears every morning before breakfast, and wc haven't thought 
of it again from that day to this. We recall that when we were in the adolescent stage 
we made a resolve not to "coon" any of Jim Hallack's watermelons, and in three days 
from that time the melon rinds along our back fence were two feet deep. This resolution 
stuff is all the bologna. If Crocket Brown, and Tragsdorf, and "Fishy" Phil, and the 
Rabbi, and that buUhead fisher at Wayne, and Estee and Longaker and a lot more of the 
boys would stop making resolutions and would put forth some tangible reason for asking 
clemency of the court we'd have hopes for their ultimate reformation, but would have 
doubts about it nevertheless. 

Down here when you see something coming down the road that looks like a clothespin 
on a grasshopper, don't think you are in Kansas; it's only a Mexican on a burro. A 
burro, in case you don't know, is an extended edition of a South Dakota jackrabbit with 
a variable speed pulley, only it always runs on low speed. If you are going to visit your 
mother-in-law on the 14th, you will want to start on the 9th, in order to get there before 
the baby cuts its third tooth. 

The burro has been the means of breaking up many a Mexican revolution; the enemy 
starved to death before the army got there. We are going to buy one for company for 
our wife's goat. Geneve says she is getting tired of acting as nurse and playmate for that 
goat and threatens to throw up the job. She never could stick to anything very long 
anyway. 

Should the next issue of the HERALD-WORLD show improvement by the absence of 
this "Colyum," don't get too hilarious and start a celebration, it will only be temporary; 
we will probably be bucking blizzards and snow drifts somewhere in Kansas and Nebraska 
trying to get back to the ruins of the old wigwam. 

J. C. JENKINS, 
The HERALD-WORLD Man. 



too. Seven reels. — Rudolf Duba. Royal theatre, Kim- 
ball, S. D. — General patronage. 

LET IT RAIN: Douglas MacLean— 20%. Decem- 
ber 26. Good little picture. Plenty of fun. Seven 
reels. — Rudolf Duba, Royal theatre, Kimball, S. D.— 
General patronage. 

LET IT RAIN: Douglas MacLean— Very good 
comedy. — A. J. Wallace, Pacific Community Associa- 
tion theatre, Columbia, S. C. — General patronage. 

THE ROUGH RIDERS: Special cast- 
Dandy picture but didn't draw the size of 
your cap. In fact, nothing draws them in as 
most of the people are out of work here and 
don't know when they will have any. — H. L. 
Bouhn, Grande theatre. Port Allegany, Pa. — 
General patronage. 



SENORITA: Bebe Daniels— Regular Doug 
Fairbanks type of picture and pleased every- 
one. Bebe is getting quite a following in my 
town and deservedly so, as she puts every- 
thing she's got in it. — H. L. Bouhn, Grande 
theatre. Port Allegany, Pa. — General pat- 
ronage. 

BLONDE OR BRUNETTE: Adolphe Menjou— 
15%. December 25. Just a big lemon, that's all. If 
it's a Paramount picture it's the worst in Kimball. 
That's the way my books show and this one has 
them all topped off. It's the worst we have had yet 
from Paramount. Have read a few good reports on 
this and I booked it on the best night of the week 
and just hurt my business. We did not see anything 
that's interesting in this one so that's the way it 
stands. Six reels. — ^Rudolf Duba, Royal theatre, 
Kimball, S. D. — General patronage. 



THE QUARTERBACK: Richard Dix— 58%. De- 
cember 5. A very good picture. Wouldn't want a 
better one. Unusually cold weather for the South 
kept many away. — H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, 
Bath, S. C. — Small town patronage. 

NOW WE'RE IN THE AIR: Beery-Hatton— 
December 25. Got over in fair shape. Most too silly 
but when the bull came down the road it got a big 
yell. Seven reels. — E. H. Randall, Liberty theatre, 
Condon, Ore. — Small town patronage. 

SWIM, GIRL. SWIM: Bebe Daniels— Good 
outdoor sport picture. Fair story. Comedy 
situations good. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, Elite 
theatre, Placerville, Cal. — General patronage, 

THE ROUGH RIDERS: Special cast— December 
28-29. Another excellent production to plenty of 
empty seats. I cannot understand why this year's 
Paramount specials fail to draw at the box office. 
They have all been good, but I can gross more busi- 
ness with Esther Ralston or Bebe Daniels or a Zane 
Grey than any of their big ones. Wish someone 
would analyze this situation for me. Ten reels. — 
E. M. Biddle, Strand theatre, Paoli, Ind. — Small town 
patronage. 

EVENING CLOTHES: Adolphe Menjou— 
Complete flop at the box office. Lost money. 
The star fails to please here. — Mrs. J. B. 
Travelle, Elite theatre, Placerville, Cal — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

ONE WOMAN TO ANOTHER: Florence Vidor— 
December 28. Good little program picture with just 
enough comedy to get it over. Five reels. — E. H. 
Randall, Liberty theatre, Condon, Ore. — ^Small town 
patronage. 

THE LAST OUTLAW: Gary Cooper— Liked very 
much. — A. J. Wallace, Pacific Community Association 
theatre, Columbia, S. C. — General patronage. 

CHANG: Special cast— Pictures of this 
type are very rare and should prove a record 
breaker if given the proper publicity as lobby 
display, window cards and heralds. — Stephen 
G. Brenner, New Eagle theatre, Baltimore, 
Md. — General patronage. 

ROUGH HOUSE ROSIE: Clara Bow— November 
15. Very good. Has the punch and the pep that 
goes a long way with our patrons. Good for any 
night in the week except Sunday. — A. J. Wallace, 
Pacific Community Association theatre, Columbia, 
S. C. — ^General patronage. 

THE MYSTERIOUS RIDER: Jack Holt^A very 
good picture that pleased our people. The picture 
deals with the ejection of a settler on a land grant. 
Some years ago many such evictions occurred on a 
Spanish land grant which is located about nine miles 
from Tombstone. A coincidence occurred when the 
picture was shown here. In the audience was a man 
well paet 60 years of age, who about 20 years ago 
was evicted from this Spanish land grant ; and the 
subject held much interest for hira. But the big 
thing was that this was the first time in his life 
that he had ever seen a moving picture and to see 
one that dealt with the subject that had cost him a 
valuable ranch years before got his goat. Six reels. 
— Giacoma Brothrs, Crystal theatre. Tombstone, Ariz. 
— General patronage. 

BARBED WIRE: Pola Negri— Played this 
on Thanksgiving and had a pretty good house, 
the first in a long time. Good picture and 
seemd to please the majority. — H. L. Bouhn, 
Grande theatre. Port Allegany, Pa. — General 
patronage. 

KNOCKOUT RILEY: Richard Dix— December 13. 
It's a knockout here. Went over well. — A. J. Wal- 
lace, Pacific Community Association theatre, Colum- 
bia, S. C. — General patronage. 

KNOCKOUT RILEY: Richard Dix— Here is a 
picture, no matter if it has Richard Dix in it. that 
will draw. The title does not appeal. It's a fairly 
good picture and if you can "bait 'em" and get them 
in they will probably enjoy it. But what good is a 
good picture with a bad title? Just as much as a 
good title for a darn bad picture, you fool them 
either way, but it is more satisfaction to fool 'em 
with a bad title. Seven reels. — Giacoma Brothers, 
Crystal theatre. Tombstone, Ariz. — General patronage. 

THE WAY OF ALL FLESH: Emil Jannings— 
December 26-27. One of the finest pictures I have 
ever seen to very i>oor business. Nine reels. — E. M. 
Biddle, Strand theatre, Paoli, Ind.— Small town 
patronage. 

SERVICE FOR LADIES: Adolphe Menjou 

Very poor box office attraction. Menjou 

fails to draw here. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, Elite 
theatre, Placerville, Cal. — General patronage. 
METROPOLIS: Special cast — December 1. Like 
all other foreign made pictures will not draw or 
please. If you have it bought better leave it in the 
can. Seven reels. — E. H. Randall, Liberty theatre, 
Condon, Ore. — Small town patronage. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



55 



SOFT CUSHIONS: Douglas MacLean— Favorably 
received, good comedy. — A. J. Wallace, Pacific Com- 
munity Association theatre, Columbia, S. C. — General 
patronage. 

IT : Clara Bow — The kind that makes the patrons 
happy after working in the industrial plant all day. 
— ^A. J. Wallace, Pacific Community Association thea- 
tre, Columbia, S. C. — General patronage. 

THE KID BROTHER: Harold Lloyd— I did 
not like this as well as some of Lloyd's and 
as it has been played all around me sometime 
ago, did not do well with it. — H. W. 
Batchelder, Gait theatre, Gait. Cal. — Small 
town patronage. 

TEN MODERN COMMANDMENTS: Esther Ral- 
ston — November 18. Likable. Used on Friday and 
Saturday. — A. J. Wallace, Pacific Community Asso- 
ciatiton theatre, Columbia, S. C. — ^General patronage. 

TEN MODERN COMMANDMENTS: Esther Ral- 
ston — A dandy good comedy drama to good business. 
They thought it great and said so. Seven reels. — 
E. M. Biddle, Strand theatre, Paoli, Ind. — Small town 
patronage. 

THE COVERED WAGON: Special cast— Decem- 
ber 15. Reissue. Very good and well received. — 
A. J. Wallace, Pacific Community Association thea- 
tre, Columbia, S. C. — Genei-al patronage. 



Pathe-P D C 

DON DESPERADO: Leo Maloney— 59%. Average 
Western. Seemed to please Saturday crowd. No 
comments. — T. W. Cannon, Majestic theatre, Green- 
ville, Tenn. — Small town patronage. 

SATAN TOWN: Harry Carey— Very good 
story. Fine acting. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, Elite 
theatre, Placerville, Cal. — General patronage. 

THE COUNTRY DOCTOR: Rudolph Schildkraut— 
70%. December 24. I believe this the most true to 
life picture I ever have presented to my people. 
Would certainly recommend this picture to small 
towns and would advise letting the rural class know 
about it. A few more pictures like this one would 
mean a lot to the small town exhibitor. Eight reels. 
— W. L. Campbell, Alert theatre, Steuben, Wis. — • 
General patronage. 

ALASKAN ADVENTURES: Special cast- 
Here's a real picture built for school tieupa. 
The finest kind of a production. Tiou can't go 
wrong on it. Print was A-1. — Dwight Grist, 
Theatorium, Columbia Falls, Mont. — General 
patronage. 

THE COUNTRY DOCTOR: Special cast— Used 
Christmas. Some said good, other said terrible. 
Acting good. Too sad. Just an old fashioned picture 
for old fashioned people. Entirely different than the 
general run of pictures. Made me money so why 
kick. — A. G. Miller, Lyric theatre, Atkinson, Neb. — 
General patronage. 

PEOPLE VS. NANCY PRESTON: Special 
cast — A picture that failed to draw. Not the 
type of story that pleases here. — Mrs. J. B. 
Travelle, Elite theatre, Placerville, Cal. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

FLAME OF THE YUKON: Special cast— 20%. 
December 17. Just about the same as most of the 
Yukon pictures. A little drink, then a fight, another 
drink and another fight. Plenty of action, but just 
an ordinary program picture. Eight reels. — W. L. 
Campbell, Alert theatre, Steuben, Wis. — General 
patronage. 

STEEL PREFERRED: William Boyd— December 
13. First class entertainment. Has everything in it 
to make a good picture for any town. Some of the 
scenes impossible. Plenty of good comedy in it. — 
George Lodge, Green Lantern theatre, Claymont, Del. 
. — General patronage. 

Tiffany 

LIGHTNING: Lightning— 100%. November 24. 
Without any extra advertising than an ordinary pro- 
gram picture, "Lightning" pulled in the largest 
crowd ever in my theatre to a picture show. Not a 
big picture but Oh Boy! how it does pull, and 
satisfied. This is the first Tiffany picture and cer- 
tainly was pleased. Book it and boost it. Eight 
reels. — W. L. Campbell, Alert theatre, Steuben, Wis. 
— General patronage. 

TIRED BUSINESS MAN: Raymond Hitch- 
cock — ^A laugh special, chuckfuU of chuckles. 
Raymond Hitchcock has yet to appear in a 
picture in which he failed to give a finished 
performance and many laughs. Many had 
seen him on the legitimate stage and came to 
see him in this picture. Ran this on a night 
the receipts of which were given to charity 
and had a nice crowd. — Ben Eskind, New 
Kentucky theatre, Madisonville, Ky. — General 
patronage. 



Truart 

THREE IN EXILE: Art Acord— This is a 
good picture but lacks action and pep. Don't 
advertise Art Acord when you run this to 
avoid disappointments. Print new. — Stephen 
G. Brenner, New Eagle theatre, Baltimore, 
Md. — General patronage. 



United Artists 

ONE EXCITING NIGHT: Special oast— 10%. 
December 31. Eleven reels of wasted film. Altogether 
too long, and very old. Eleven reels. — ^W. L. Camp- 
bell, Alert theatre, Steuben, Wis. — General patronage. 

WILD JUSTICE: Special cast— This wasn't 
such a bad picture after all. Patrons received 
it very well, although there was nothing new 
in it. The print was the nearest thing to a 
piece of junk I've ever handled. Some of the 
subtitles were badly streaked on one side de- 
tracting from the enjoyment, and the light 
penetration was nothing to brag about. A 
good print would have made a better presenta- 
tion. Tone fair, special no. — C. G. Brothers, 
Grand theatre. Grand River, la. — General pat- 
ronage. 

Universal 

A HERO FOR A NIGHT: Special cast— 40%. 
December 30-31. Must back up Mr. Laemrhle's state- 
ment about Glenn Tryon being comedy find. Boys, 
grab him, he's fine. And I think we will make some 
jack with him if business conditions ever get bet- 
ter. This picture is one of Universal's many good 
ones. Six reels. — R. D. Young, Rex theatre, Monte- 
zuma, Ind. — General patronage. 

THE CAT AND THE CANARY: Laura 
LaPlante — Another box office winner plus the 
best in entertainment. Played it on a rainy 
day and night and did fairly well considering 
the weather. Promise plenty of mystery and 
thrills when you advertise this and they'll 
surely get everything and then some. Pleased 
all classes from the sixes to the sixties. Let's 
have some more like this (but a big cut in 
the price). Laura LaPlante has been com- 
ing along by leaps and bounds and with this 
picture she has finally arrived. Admission on 
this picture 10-15-25 cents. — Ben Eskind, New 
Kentucky theatre, Madisonville, Ky. — General 
patronage. 

BEWARE OF WIDOWS: Laura La Plant^lO%. 
December 14. Fair program entertainment and where 
they like Laura real well, should do good business. 
Six reels. — Rudolf Duba, Royal theatre, Kimball, 
S. D. — General patronage. 

HERO ON HORSEBACK: Hoot Gibson— 13%. 
December 16-17. Best Hoot Gibson we have played 
for a long time. Good picture for theatres that 
want Westerns. Oh boy ! how good this was and 
no business. Must be Christmas Eeason and the 
money is spent for gifts. Six reels. — Rudolph Duba, 
Royal theatre, Kimball, S. D. — General patronage. 

SHIELD OF HONOR: Special cast— This 
isn't the big special that Universal tells you 
it is, although it is a fair picture. Print not 
so good, a bit foggy in places. Universal's 
Complete Service plan is a boon to the small 
exhibitor. — Dwight Grist, Theatorium, Colum- 
bia Falls, Mont. — General patronage. 

SENSATION SEEKERS: Huntly Gordon— 9%. 
December 21. Very nice program that did not regis- 
at all. Six reels. — 'Rudolf Duba, Royal theatre, 
Kimball, S. D. — General patronage. 

THE CAT AND THE CANARY: Laura La Plante 
— December 18. Fair mystery drama, slightly bet- 
ter than the program type. Showed to less than 
average Sunday business. Not a special, nor is it 
worth special price. Eight reels. — E. H. Randall, 
Liberty theatre, Condon, Ore. — ^Small town patronage. 

FAST AND FURIOUS: Reginald Denny— Decem- 
ber 26-27. A good clean comedy with many funny 
situations, and good subtitles. A very good picture, 
but hardly a special. — George Lodge, Green Lantern 
theatre, Claymont, Del. — General patronage. 

A MAN'S PAST: Special cast— Very good 
drama. Appeal okey. Print fine. Drew all 
classes here. — Dwight Grist, Theatorium, Co- 
lumbia Falls, Mont. — General patronage. 

THE WRONG MR. WRIGHT: Jean Hersholt— 
December 29-30. This is only fair. Good in spots, 
but seems to drag too much, probably due to its 
length. If they made some of these alleged Jewels 
in five reels instead of seven or eight reels, the pic- 
tures would all be improved, and a lot of postage 
and express would be saved. The first night gave 
the picture and the house to the Legion Boys and 
ran the two reels of the Legionairea last trip to 



Paris. These pictures were taken by Pathe and are 
nice and clear. Seven reels. — Wm. E. Tragsdorf, 
Trags theatre, Neillsville, Wis. — Small town pa- 
tronage. 

THE STOLEN RANCH: Fred Humes— December 
20. An ordinary Western with a fair amount of 
appeal. Just barely an average picture, with fair 
appeal for those who like Westerns. — George Lodge, 
Green Lantern theatre, Claymont, Del. — General 
patronage. 

THE MYSTERY CLUB: Special cast— December 

24. Acting was good, but the picture is absolutely 
spoiled by the lack of any clearly defined plot. As it 
is, it has no appeal at all. — ^George Lodge, Green 
Lantern theatre, Claymont, Del. — General patronage. 

SILK STOCKINGS: Laura LaPlante — December 

25. A fair farce that pleased the majority. Nothing 
to rave over but had fair business so can't kick. 
Seven reels. — John L. Damm, Strand theatre. Wads- 
worth, O. — General patronage. 

THE COHENS AND KELLYS: Special cast- 
December 26-27. A very good comedy drama. I ran 
it two nights and broke my house record, but film 
was in awful poor condition. I had to patch for 
four hours before I could use it. Eight reels. — F. A. 
Reiss, Grand theatre, Orrin, N. D. — General pat- 
ronage. 

Warner Bros. 

THE BLACK DIAMOND EXPRESS: Monte Blue 
— 50%. December 27. This is an extra good pro- 
gram picture. The star always good. Story and 
cast fine. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville, Mich. — ^General patronage. 

ONE ROUND HOGAN: Monte Blue— A 
very good boxing picture with Jamies J. Jef- 
fries. Book it and boost it. Your patrons 
will be pleased. Print brand new. Drew all 
classes. — L. W. Bagwell, Jr., Crystal theatre, 
Oakman, Ala. — General patronage. 

THE BLACK DIAMOND EXPRESS: Monte Blue 
December 24. A pretty good program picture. Seven 
reels. — Wm. E. Tragsdorf, Trags theatre, Neills- 
ville, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

THE FIRST AUTO: Barney Oldficld— The 
biggest flop I've ever had from Warner 
Brothers. The price was extremely high and 
the picture was extremely rotten. Absolutely 
nothing to it. Don't advertise it as a special, 
as the price would indicate it to be, because 
it will disappoint the majority. I hope War- 
ner Brothers don't put out any more like 
this. — Ben Eskind, New Kentucky theatre, 
Madisonville, Ky. — General patronage. 

MATINEE LADIES: May McAvoy— 50%. Decem- 
ber 30. This is a splendid program picture. — Bert 
Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich.— 
General patronage. 

WHAT HAPPENED TO FATHER : Warner 
Oland — The whole picture belongs to Warner 
Oland through his wonderful acting. The 
story of an absent-minded scientist who be- 
came rejuvenated on Broadway with the help 
of oodles of pretty chorus girls. Advertise it 
big, for everyone will certainly enjoy it. Ad- 
mission 10-15 cents. — Ben Eskind, New Ken- 
tucky theatre, Madisonville, Ky. — General 
patronage. 

IRISH HEARTS: May McAvoy— Just a program 
picture. Not much to it. Seven reels. — Dewey L. 
Kisor, Sterling theatre, Fairmont, Neb. — Small town 
patronage. 

THE BLACK DIAMOND EXPRESS: Monte 
Blue — A fine picture. Everybody well pleased 
with this picture. Very funny in places. You 
can't go wrong on this one. — Ray P. Murphy, 
Old Trail theatre, Hebron, O. — General pat- 
ronage. 

LADY WINDEMERE'S FAN: Irene Rich— Decem- 
ber 25-26. This is one of the finest pictures I have 
run for a long time. As a rule one director's work 
is just about like another's so far as I am concerned, 
but Lubitsch's deft touches can certainly be noticed 
throughout this picture. Will please all your better 
class patrons. Eight reels. — Wm. E. Tragsdorf, 
Trags theatre, Neillsville, Wis. — General patronage. 

PRIVATE IZZY MURPHY: Special cist^ 
A fair picture. Poor box office attrac'ion. 
Moral tone good, suitable for Sunday, audience 
appeal fair. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, Elite thea- 
tre, Placerville, Cal. — General patronage. 

IRISH HEARTS: Dolores Costello— Very 
poor box office attraction. — Mrs. J. B. Travelle, 
Elite theatre, Placerville, Cal. — General pat- 
ronage. 

ACROSS THE PACIFIC: Monte Blue- 
Good picture. Plenty of action. Fine story. 
— Mrs. J. B. Travelle, Elite theatre, Placer- 
ville, Cal.— General patronage. 



56 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



SIMPLE SIS: Louise Fazenda — Just a picture 
that will pass for a program. Seven reels. — Dewey 
L. Kisor, Sterling theatre, Fairmont, Neb. — ^Small 
town patronage. 

State Rights 

THE PASSION PLAY: Special cast— 25%. No- 
vember 30. A fine picture and every exhibitor should 
run it. Played one night to a small house and on 
account of heavy competition didn't get much out of 
it. Six reels. — W. C. Snyder, Cozy theatre. Lament, 
Okla. — General patronage. 

CALL OF THE KLONDIKE: Special cast 
— A very good picture, have seen better. Some 
liked it and some did not like it. About 50-50. 
— M. H. Haymans, Dreamland theatre, Met- 
ter, Ga. — General patronage. 

DESERT GREED: Yakima Canutt — Aver- 
age Western. Star goes very well with me. 
Should prove a good bet where they want 
Western and action pictures. Print good. — 
Stephen G. Brenner, New Eagle theatre, Bal- 
timore, Md. — General patronage. 

FALL OF THE ALAMO: Cullen Landis— 
The historical title will draw with extensive 
advertising. Fine for a tieup with schools. 
A picture crammed full of cowboys and "In- 
juns." The burning of the Alamo and Cul- 
len Landis' acting at this point will stir your 
pulses. Admission 10-15 cents. — Ben Eskind, 
New Kentucky theatre, Madisonville, Ky. — 
General patronage. 

ISABEL: Special cast — I think this picture 
has as good appeal as I ever saw. It will 
make any exhibitor money at this time of the 
year. — M. H. HaymJans, Dreamland theatre, 
Mctter, Ga. — General patronage. 

THE PASSION PLAY: Special cast— A 
good picture and should have had a good pat- 
ronage but couldn't get them in. Played one 
night to a small house and made just a little 
above expenses. — W. C. Snyder, Cozy theatre. 
Lament, Okla, — General patronage. 

THE WHITE MAN: Kenneth Harlan— 
This is not just a fair program picture, but 
a good one. Kenneth Harlan always a good 
actor, is better than usual in this one. He is 
very well supported by Alice Joyce and Walter 
Long, one of the best character men in the 
business. Admission 10-15 cents. — Ben Eskind, 
New Kentucky theatre, Madisonville, Ky. — 
General patronage. 

Serials 

PERILS OF THE JUNGLE: (Artclass) Eugenia 
Gilbert — There's a serial that eure gets the kids and 
quite a few older people. Business held up well 
through the 10 weeks. Ten episodes.— T. W. Can- 
non, Majestic theatre, Greenville, TeTin. — Small town 
patronage. 

KING OF THE JUNGLE: (Rayart) Special 
cast — A very good beginning. Chapter 1 of 
this serial looks as if it will be a good boost 
for a sick box office. — Stephen G. Brenner, 
New Eagle theatre, Baltimore, Md. — General 
patronage. 

THE RETURN OF THE RIDDLE RIDER: 
(Universal) William Desmond — On Chapter 6 
and still pleasing. Desmond is well liked 
here. Prints always good. — Stephen G. Bren- 
ner, New Eagle theatre, Baltimore, Md. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

WHISPERING SMITH RIDES: (Universal) Wal- 
lace McDonald — No. 9. Fair serial. Not holding up 
as good as the other serials I have run from Uni- 
versal. Two reels. — W. U. Shelnutt, City theatre, 
LaFayette, Ala. — General patronage. 

Short Subjects 

EDUCATIONAL 
BEAUTY A LA MUD: Jimmie Adams— A beauty 
shop comedy. Good. Two reels. — T. W. Cannon, 
Majestic theatre, Greenville, Tenn. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

BREAK AWAY: Jimmie Adams— Rather good 
comedy. Many good laughs. Two reels. — T. W. 
Cannon, Majestic theatre, Greenville, Tenn. — Small 
town patronage. 

DUMB BELLS: Billy Dooley— A good funny 
comedy. Two reels. — Bert Silver, Silver Family thea- 
tre, Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

JELLY FISH: Franklyn Pangborn — Fair comedy. 
Nothing extra. A few laughs. Two reels. — T. W. 
Cannon. Majestic theatre, Greenville, Tenn. — Small 
town patronage. 



You Analysts, 
Get Busy! 

E. M. Biddle of Paoli, Ind., pre- 
sents a problem to the reporters to 
this department. 

Mr. Biddle has found that, despite 
the merits of special attractions, 
productions which should pack 
'em in, they do not draw at the box 
office. On the other hand, pro- 
gram pictures are making the 
money for him. 

Mr. Biddle asks: "Why?" He 
would like to have comment from 
other reporters to this department. 
In requesting an analysis, Mr. Bid- 
dle neglects to say whether or not 
he raises his admission on specials, 
which might have some bearing 
apon the box office condition 
which he reports. 



LISTEN LENA: Al St. John— A snappy comedy. 
Al is hard to beat and thie one is good. Two reels. 
— T. W. Cannon, Majestic theatre, Greenville, Tenn. 
— ^Small town patronage. 

FBO 

A KICK IN THE DARK: Al Cook-Kit Guard— 
This was the last of the "Wlsecrackers" and it was 
a dandy. Thanks, boys. Off for the Beauty Parlor 
series. Two reels. — Rudolf Duba, Royal theatre, 
Kimball, S. D. — General patronage. 

HARRY FULL BACK: Three Fat Men— 
This is the first comedy I've had that I could 
hear the audience laugh above the grind of 
the projector but this one got them in the 
funny spot. Play it. Two reels. — L. L. Like, 
Dreamland theatre, Drummond, Mont. — Rural 
patronage. 

STOMACH TROUBLES: Krazie Kal>-Just like all 
others, not so good. One reel. — Rudolf Duba, Royal 
theatre, Kimball, S. D. — General patronage. 

THE UNSOCIAL THREE: Personally I thought 
this a very poor comedy, but I heard a few laughs, 
so I suppose it pleased a few. Two reels. — W. C. 
Snyder, Cozy theatre, Lamont, Okla. — ^General pat- 
tronage. 

WANDERERS OF THE WAISTUNE: Three Fat 
Men — CJood comedy of the Western type with the 
Fattys. Plenty of fun. Two reels. — Rudolf Duba, 
Royal theatre, Kimball, S. D. — General patronage. 

YOUR NEXT: Three Fat Men— Couldn't be worse. 
Two reels. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville, Mich. — General patronage. 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 

THE OLD WALLOP: Our Gang— This com- 
edy would carry any weak picture. Our audi- 
ence stood up in their scats. Played with 
"Rookies" and believe comedy got as many 
laughs as the picture. — Ray P. Murphy, Old 
Trail theatre, Hebron, O. — (Jeneral patronage. 

PARAMOUNT 

MOONEY MARINER: Billy Dooley— Very good. 
Gets the laughs as nearly all Paramount comedies do 
for me. Two reels. W. U. Shelnutt, City theatre, 
LaFayette, Ala. — General patronage. 

NEWS: No. 40. Very good news. Get a good 
deal of local happenings. My patrons seem to enjoy 
it very much. — 'W. U. Shelnutt, City theatre, LaFay- 
ette, Ala. — ^General patronage. 

ROW, SAILOR. ROW: Billy Dooley— Extra good 
two reels of laughs. — ^W. U. Shelnutt, City theatre, 
LaFayette, Ala. — ^General patronage. 



PATHE 

SMALL TOWN PRINCESS: A real funny com- 
edy. Two reels. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. — (Jeneral patronage. 

HOBOKEN TO HOLLYWOOD: This one 
was a real scream. — C. G. Brothers, Grand 
theatre, Grand River, la. — General patronage. 

PATHE COMEDIES: The best all around 
comedies for small towns. Prints and paper 
fine. — Dwight Grist, Theatorium, Colombia 
Falls, Mont. — General patronage. 

SMITH'S NEW HOME: A laugh in every 
foot. — C. G. Brothers, Grand theatre. Grand 
River, la. — General patronage. 

UKULELE SHEIKS: Glenn Tryon— Good 
comedy. When better comedies are made Hal 
Roach will make them. — Stephen G. Brenner, 
New Eagle theatre, Baltimore, Md. — (general 
patronage. 

WISE GUYS PREFER BRUNETTES: Only 
fair for a two reeler. — C. G. Brothers, Grand 
theatre. Grand River, la. — ^General patronage. 

SMITH'S PETS: A comedy. Two reels.— Bert 
Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — 
General patronage. 

SODA WATER COWBOY: Wally Wales— 83%. 
A little different from most Westerns, and class it as 
a good Western. Five reels. — T. W. Cannon, Majes- 
tic theatre, Greenville, Tenn. — Small town patronage. 

UNIVERSAL 

A CLOSE CALL: Andy Gump — Good Gump com- 
edy. Severa good heary laughs. Two reels. — W. U. 
Shelnutt, Ciy theatre, LaFayette, Ala. — General pat- 
ronage. 

DOUBLE TROUBLE: Fred Gillman— A good short 
Western that went over fine with those who like this 
type of picture. Two reels. — W. C. Snyder, Cozy 
theatre, Lamont, Okla. — General patronage. 

BACHiWARD GEORGE: "Let (Jeorge Do 
It" series. Good comedy. Fair print. — 
Stephen G. Brenner, New Eagle theatre, Bal- 
timore, Md. — General patronage. 

HIS DAY OF DAYS: Neely Edwards— Just a fair 
filler. Neely doesn't mean a thing on the screen. 
One reel.— Rudolf Duba, Royal theatre, Kimball, 
S. D. — ^General patronage. 

LOOK OUT BUSTER: Buster Brown— Not much 
without Tige. The comedy very slow. Two reels.— 
W. U. Shelnutt, Ciy theatre, LaFayette, Ala.— Gen- 
eral patronage. 

OLGA'S BOATMAN: Charles Puffy— Just a fair 
filler. One reel.— Rudolf Duba, Royal theatre, Kim- 
ball, S. D. — General patronage. 

SLEEPY TIME GALL: Arthur Lake— Not much 
to this comedy. Just one thousand feet of film 
wasted. One reel.— Rudolf Duba, Royal theatre. 
Kimball, S. D. — General patronage. 

SNOOKUMS ASLEEP: Snookum— Not much com- 
edy. Snookum comedies seem to be getting old with 
my patrons. Two reels. — W. U. Shelnutt, City thea- 
tre, LaFayette, Ala. — ^General patronage. 

SON OF ANANIAS: George K. Arthur— Once 
this was substituted to me and played and now they 
have booked it in again. Having no record of book- 
ings we did not know until the scenes started to 
show up. We knew right away we had played it. 
Well, we will get rebate anyhow. It is a good one 
reeler. One reel. — Rudolf Duba, Royal theatre, Kim- 
ball, S. D. — ^General patronage. 

TALE OF A SHIRT: Neely Edwards— These 
Bluebird comedies used to be pretty good in its first 
beginning but they are slipping very fast. Won't be 
worth running pretty soon. One reel. — Rudolf Duba, 
Royal theatre, Kimball, S. D. — General patronage. 

TRAIL OF TRICKERY: Edmund Cobb— A good 
two reel Western in a story of the Northwest 
Mounted Police. Gave very good satisfaction. Two 
reels. — ^W. C. Snyder, C!ozy theatre. Lamont. Okla. — 
General patronage. 

UNDER THE BED: Charles Puffy— Rotten, is the 
only comment. One reel. — Rudolf Duba, Royal thea- 
tre, Kimball. S. D. — General patronage. 

ANIMAL CATCHERS: A very poor imita- 
tion of Roach "Our Gang" comedies. Suitable 
for a backwoods show where they don't know 
any better. Print good. — Stephen G. Brenner, 
New Eagle theatre, Baltimore, Md. — General 
patronage. 



January 14, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



57 



THE BOX OFFICE TICKER 



A System for Determining the Definite Attraction Values of Motion Pictures 



Exhibitors reporting to "What the Picture Did For Me" 
supply a percentage rating obtained by dividing average 
daily gross of house record attraction into average daily 
gross of picture being reported on. When 10 of these 
percentage ratings on a picture have been received, the 



average of these 10 percentage ratings is entered in "The 
Ticker." Each additional percentage-rating report re- 
ceived on pictures entered is combined with those pre- 
viously received and the new average thus created is 
entered. 



Ben Hur (MCM) „ 95.83% 

The Lost World (FN) -80.70% 

Ao Man's Gold (Fox) 80.57% 

The Mysterious Rider (Par) _ 78.94% 

The Iron Horse (Fox) „ 78.61% 

Laddie (FBO) - -76.80% 

Irene (FN) 76.75% 

Chip of the Flying U (U) —75.60% 

The Great K. & A. Train Robbery (Fox) -74.80% 

The Cohens and Kellys (U) 74.75% 

Rookies (MGM) 74.55% 

Keeper of the Bees (FBO) -74.33% 

The Vanishing American (Par) _ -73.95% 

The Winning of Barbara Worth (UA) _ 72.60% 

The Calgary Stampede (U) 72.54% 

Hills of Kentucky (WB) 72.46% 

The Last Trail (Fox) _ _ 72.40% 

Tell It to the Marines (MCM) _ -72.30% 

The Phantom of the Opera (U) 71.90% 

Naughty but Nice (FN) - 71.73% 

Arizona Sweepstakes (U) - 71.42% 

The Magic Garden (FBO) _ 71.34% 

TiUie the Toiler (MGM) 71.14% 

The Volga Boatman (PDC). - - -70.68% 

The Gorilla Hunt (FBO) -70.64% 

The Bat (UA) 70.40% 

Johnny Get Your Hair Cut (MCM) 69.64% 

The Gentle Cyclone (U) - -68.81% 

It (Par) - 68.52% 

Ella Cinders (FN) 68.46% 

The Sea Beast (WB) 68.45% 

Slide, Kelly, Slide (MCM). _ 68.22% 

The Son of the Sheik (UA) 68.09% 

Children of Divorce (Par) 68.00% 

Don Mike (FBO) 67.95% 

Tarzan and the Golden Lion (FBO) „.67.80% 

The Man on the Box (WB) 67.70% 

Mr. Wu (MGM) 67.70% 

The Tough Guy (FBO) 67.68% 

The Scarlet West (FN) 67.407o 

The Last Frontier (PDC)... 66.7a''/o 

The Midnight Kiss (Fox) „ 66.70% 

The Four Horsemen (MGM) 66.50% 

The Campus Flirt (Par) ^ -66.41% 

Flesh and the Devil (MGM) 66.25% 

The Phantom Bullet (U) -66.23% 

The Black Pirate (UA) 66.04% 

The Quarterback (Par) - -65.85% 

Casey at the Bat (Par) 65.81% 

Babe Comes Home (FN) , - _.65.72% 

The Unknown Cavalier (FN) 65.66% 

Three Bad Men (Fox) _ 65.60% 

Man of the Forest (Par) 65.53% 

Senor Daredevil (FN) 65.48% 

The Kid Brother (Par) 65.33% 

Let's Get Married (Par) _ 65.00% 

The Devil Horse (P) .64.82% 

Desert Cold (Par) _ 64.81% 

The Limited Mail (WB) 64.70% 

Sea Horses (Par) „ - 64.63% 

His Secretary (MCM) 64.50% 

Across the Pacific (WB) 64.06% 

For Heaven's Sake (Par) _ 64.00% 

The Night Cry (WB) 63.90% 

Corporal Kate (PDC) 63.83% 

Up in Mabel's Room (PDC) 63.81% 

We're in the Navy Now (Par) 63.70% 

McFadden's Flats (FN) 63.58% 

Frisco Sally Levy (MGM) 63.45% 

Skinner's Dress Suit (U) 63.42% 

Hands Across the Border (FBO) 63.40% 

Canyon of Light (Fox) 63.16% 

The Overland Stage (FN) 63.08% 

Land Beyond the Law (FN) 63.00% 

While London Sleeps (WB).... 63.00% 

TTie Man in the Saddle (U) 62.85% 

Tin Hats (MGM) 62.82% 

Lone Hand Saunders (FBO).... 62.71% 

Brown of Harvard (MGM) 61.96% 

The Scarlet Letter (MGM) 61.94% 

Heaven on Earth (MGM) 61.91% 

Little Annie Rooney (UA) 61.84% 

A Regular Scout (FBO) 61.36% 

War Paint (MGM) 61.17% 

Tony Runs Wild (Fox) 60.94% 

The Two Gun Man (FBO) 60.85% 

His People (U) 60.70% 

California Straight Ahead (U) 60.63% 

Sweet Daddies (FN) 60.55% 

Twinkletoes (FN) 60.50% 

The Bnckaroo Kid (U) 60.45% 

Behind the Front (Par) 60.35% 

Moulders of Men (FBO) 60.30% 



Tramp, Tramp, Tramp (FN) 60.06% 

The Fire Brigade (MGM) „ 60.00% 

Clash of the Wolves (WB) „ 59.93% 

The Understanding Heart (MGM) 59.88% 

The Flaming Forest (MGM) - 59.78% 

The Masquerade Bandit (FBO). _.59.72% 

The Waning Sex (MGM) 59.51% 

The Teaser (U) _ 59.50% 

Orchids and Ermine (FN) 59.46% 

Son of His Father (Par) ...-59.40% 

The Flaming Frontier (U) 58.96% 

Thai's My Baby (Par) SS.SS'/o 

Under Western Skies (U) - 58.83% 

Desert Valley (Fox)...- 58.66% 

The Wilderness Woman (FN) 58.64% 

The Denver Dude (U) _ 58.43% 

Wild to Go (FBO) -58.33% 

Sally, Irene and Mary (MCM) 58.09% 

The Texas Streak (U)..._ 58.07% 

The Goose Woman (U) - - 57.80% 

Rolling Home (U) 57.75% 

Paradise (FN) _ 57.50% 

The Red Mill (MGM) 57.35% 

The Dark Angel (FN)... „ 57.14% 

Private Izzy Murphy (WB) - 57.00% 

The Eagle (UA) 56.90% 

The Flying Horseman (Fox) 56.85% 

Knockout Riley (Par) - 56.80% 

The Temptress (MGM) - 56.73% 

Old Clothes (MGM) 56.69% 

Mike (MGM) — 56.4Syo 

Sally of the Sawdust (UA) -.56.45% 

Men of Steel (FN) - 56.367o 

Blind Alleys (Par) _ 56.30% 

Kid Boots (Par) _ 56.29% 

Man Power (Par) „ 56.00% 

Wild Justice (UA) 55.86% 

The Rainmaker (Par)....^ - 55.72% 

Born to the West (Par) 55.63% 

Valley of Hell (MGM) 55.60% 

Forlorn River (Par)...- 55.57% 

For Alimony Only (PDC) 55.40% 

Senorita (Par) _. _ 55.30% 

Forever After (FN) 55.27% 

Mantrap (Par) —.55.20% 

It Must Be Love (FN) _.„55.18% 

Winners of the Wilderness (MGM) 55.10% 

The Johnstown Flood (Fox) _ _ 55.08% 

The Unknown Soldier (PDC) - 55.00% 

What Happened to Jones (U) 54.88% 

The Cowboy Cop (FBO) 54.76% 

Let It Rain (Par) 54.65% 

Upstage (MGM) _ _ 54.56% 

Hero of the Big Snows (WB) 53.90% 

The Road to Mandalay (MGM) 53.90% 

The Silent Rider (U) _ 53.75% 

The Barrier (MGM) 53.70% 

Red Hot Leather (U) 53.70% 

Stella Dallas (UA) 53.54% 

Her Father Said No (FBO) 53.50% 

Beverly of Graustark (MCM) 53.40% 

The Runaway (Par) 53.40% 

After Midnight (MGM) 53.36% 

The Family Upstairs (Fox) - 53.36% 

Breed of the Sea (FBO) 53.23% 

Subway Sadie (FN) 53.04% 

Padlocked (Par) _ 52.82% 

The Midnight Sun (U) 52.77% 

Mother (FBO) 52.72% 

Sweet Rosie O'Grady (Col) 52.72% 

Poker Faces (U) 52.68% 

Miss Nobody (FN) 52.66% 

Stepping Along (FN) 52.66% 

The Return of Peter Grimm (Fox) 52.66% 

Tom and His Pals (FBO) 52.40% 

CaUfomla (MGM) 52.33% 

The Country Beyond (Fox) 52.00% 

The Blue Eagle (Fox) 51.70% 

Her Big Night (U) 51.65% 

Prince of Pilsen (PDC) 51.60% 

The Strong Man (FN) 51.46% 

The Palm Beach Girl (Par) „ 51.41% 

The Greater Glory (FN) 51.36% 

Say It Again (Par) 51.15% 

Variety (Par) 51.11% 

Aloma of the South Seas (Par) 51.10°^ 

Kosher Kitty Kelly (FBO) 51 01% 

Tumbleweeds (UA) 51.07% 

Spangles (UA) 51.00% 

Sparrows (UA) .';0.95% 

Stranded in Paris (Par) 50.95% 

Combat (U) 50.80% 

Eagle of the Sea (Par) 50.69% 



Outside the Law (U) JO.60% 

The Arizona Streak (FBO) _ 50.53% 

The Still Alarm (U) 50.38% 

The Wanderer (Par) „ 50.36% 

Whispering Wires (Fox) 50.33% 

Hogan's Alley (WB) - 50.25% 

Mare Nostrum (MGM) _ SO.22% 

Somewhere in Sonora (FN) _ „ 50.18% 

Prisoners of the Slorm (U) SO.13% 

Bred in Old Kentucky (FBO) 50.00% 

You Never Know Women (Par) .50.00% 

The Brown Derby (FN) 49.90% 

The Sea Tiger (FN) _...49.90% 

Pals In Paradise (PDC) - 49.83% 

The MiUion Dollar Handicap (PDC) 49.82% 

Tin Gods (Par) 49.767o 

The Show Off (Par) 49.73% 

One Minute to Play (FBO) 49.66% 

The Seventh Bandit (P) 49.54% 

The Ancient Highway (Par) .49.40% 

Love 'Em and Leave 'Em (Par) .49.31% 

The Runaway Express (U) .49.25% 

The Ice Flood (U) .48.66% 

The Adorable Deceiver (FBO) -48.63% 

Faust (MGM) -48.60% 

The Music Master (Fox) 48.60% 

Whispering Smith (PDC) - 48.45% 

The Potters (Par) 48.30% 

Battling Butler (MGM) 48.16% 

Her Honor the Governor (FBO) 48.11% 

The New Commandment (FN) 48.08% 

So's Your Old Man (Par) 48.00% 

The General (UA) - 47.90% 

New York (Par) .47.81% 

The Taxi Dancer (MGM) 47.40% 

Wedding Bills (Par) _ 47.36% 

Desert's Toll (MCM)_ 47.33% 

Hair Trigger Baxter (FBO) - 47.18% 

The Waltz Dream (MGM) 47.15% 

Dancing Mothers (Par) 46.90% 

Wet Paint (Par) 46.81% 

There You Are (MGM) 46.77% 

Take It From Me (U) 46.75% 

Paradise for Two (Par) 46.72% 

The Silent Lover (FN) 46.63% 

Out of the West (FBO) 46.09% 

Syncopating Sue (FN) 46.07% 

Altars of Desire (MGM) 45.69% 

The Border Sheriff (U) 45.00% 

The Cat's Pajamas (Par) 44.93% 

Just Another Blonde (FN) 44.91% 

Fine Manners (Par) 44.40% 

The Marriage Clause (U) 44.35% 

Thirty Below Zero (Fox) 44.30% 

The Blind Goddess (Par) 43.88% 

The Mystery Club (U) 43.83% 

Mismates (FN) 43.72% 

The Duchess of Buffalo (FN) - 43.46% 

A Little Journey (MGM) -43.46% 

Fascinating Youth (Par) .43.85% 

The New Klondike (Par) 43.27% 

Partners Again (UA) 42.87% 

Bardelys the Magnificent (MGM) 42.73% 

Special Delivery (Par) 42.18% 

Miss Brewster's Millions (Par) 42.12% 

Hanson's Folly (FN) .42.00% 

La Boheme (MGM) 41.95% 

Midnight Lovers (FN) 41.85% 

The Love Thief (U) 41.72% 

Ladies at Play (FN) 41.61% 

The Canadian (Par) 41.58% 

Hold That Lion (Par) 41.54% 

Blarney (MGM) 41.38% 

Blonde or Brunette (Par) 41.30% 

The Old Soak (U) 41.06% 

The Wise Guy (FN) 40.92% 

Kiki (FN) .. -40.70% 

Fig Leaves (Fox) _ 40.23% 

The Boy Friend (MGM) 40.20% 

A Kiss in a Taxi (Par) 40.00% 

Held by the Law (U) - 39.64% 

Bigger Than Bamums (FBO) 39.53% 

Lovers (MGM) 39.20% 

Evervbody's Acting (Par) 88.70% 

The Ace of Cads (Par) 38.66% 

Steel Preferred (PDC) 38.36% 

Nell Gwyn (Par) 37.54% 

Into Her Kingdom (FN) 36.33% 

Perch of the Devil (U) 35.87% 

The Amateur Gentleman (FN) 35.50% 

The Great Gatsby (Par) 35.33% 

The Magician (MGM) - 34.42% 

You'd Be Surprised (Par) 84.23% 



58 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 14, 1928 



CHICAGO PERSONALITIES 

By Whit 

"1 have no idea what the outcome of the latest Union demands will be," says 
Jack Miller. "The exhibitors have offered the operators' union a two and half 
per cent increase in wages, but that has been refused." Several meetings have 
already been held between the exhibitors and operators, but nothing has been 
done in the way of agreement. Another meeting is to be held Monday after- 
noon, but this goes to press before the results will be known. 



Marie Pearson has just returned from a 
trip to Denver where she has been demon- 
strating the Orchestraphone to Colorado 
exhibitors. On her way home she spent 
the holidays with friends in Kansas City. 

* * * 

John Flinn, vice president of Pathe, was 
in town Friday on his way to California. 

* * * 

The Chicago Universal exchange has chal- 
lenged the New York exchange to a race 
during Universal's Twenty-second Anni- 
versary drive, lasting from January 22 to 
May 5. Last year the New York exchange 
challenged Chicago and won. Herbel says 
that his boys are enthusiastic over the race 
and that they are all set for victory. The 
national winner of the drive gets a Cadillac 
car. 

^ ^ 

American Legion officials of Chicago 
were given a private screening of F B O's 
"Legionnaires in Paris" last Wednesday at 
12:30. 



George Christian is now manager of the 
People's theatre on West 47th street. N. A. 
Packwood, who resigned as manager, will 
announce his new connection shortly. 

* * * 

Joe Lyon is recuperating from a bad 
shock received last week. An exhibitor 
made a special trip to the F B O exchange 
to thank him for selling him a certain series 
of short subjects. The exhibitor was John 
Remijos who operates the Gaelic theatre. 

* * * 

I surely did pop into Cecil Maberry's of- 
fice last week at the wrong time. Milton 
Stern, who sells insurance, was there, and 
now I've booked some of Milton's product 
on a life time contract. The only way I 
can cancel the booking is to die. Milt sure 
knows his rates, and why shouldn't he. He 
had 15 years of good experience in the film 
business before he took up insurance. 
=K * * 

If I had a bunch of rockets, I'd shoot 'em 
all ofif together. I have just run across a 



TEMPTATIONS 
OfASnOPGIRt 

^/..^ BETTY COMPSON 

lAUUNEGARON AftMAND KALIZ 
R^rMOKD GLENN 



FIBST DIVISION 
PICTURE . 




For Illinois 

GREIVER PRODUCTIONS 

83 1 SOUTH WABASH AVE., 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



For Indiana 

MIDWEST FILM CO. 

OF INDIANA 

218 Wluiniar BIdg., Indianupolii 



"Can't Turn Churches 
To Theatres," She Says 

"Churches are using large signs 
and motion picture ads to draw peo- 
ple into their doors," said Ruth Cald- 
well, assistant dean of women at the 
University of Illinois, in a talk 
before the Church Workers of Col- 
leges and Universities of the United 
States, meeting in Chicago recently 
at the Edgewater Beach hotel. "This 
sort of thing merely draws the 
marginal fringe of students. We can't 
turn our churches into theatres," con- 
cluded Miss Caldwell. 



woman who knows what she wants when 
she wants it. Last week Tess Heraty de- 
cided she wanted a new fur coat. Thirty 
minutes later she had bought one. Now, 
doggonit, I believe that's a record. And 
the coat she bought is a knockout. Tess 
says it's a Baronduki, whatever that is. 

* * * 

This being leap year, all the newspapers 
over the country have been printing lists of 
available and desirable bachelors in their 
towns. Checking over the boys along the 
row, I find there is a whole gob of bache- 
lors running loose. Whether or not bache- 
lors in the film business are considered de- 
sirable, I'm not in a position to say, but 
any young lady will be furnished with an 
imposing list if she writes this department, 
free of charge. 

Roy Deitrich's first week at the Avalon as 
band leader met with the approval of the 
Avalon patrons. He succeeded Buddy Fischer 
on the first of the year. 

Armin Hand is now band leader at the 
new Shore theatre on the South Side, and 
his brother, Arthur, is serving in a like 
capacity at the Piccadilly. Both are well 
known in Chicago. 

* * * 

Five shows a day were necessary to afford 
all the Mark Fisher fans: an opportunity to 
see him last week on his return to the Senate. 



A sales conference of the Midwest ex- 
changes of Fox Films was held at the Stev- 
ens hotel last Friday. Managers from Min- 
neapolis, Omaha, Des Moines, Kansas City, 
St. Louis and Chicago were present. Men 
from the home office were Peck Gomersoll, 
Edward Grainger, McAvoy and Daley. 

* * * 

According to officials at the United 
Artists theatre, "the picture palace for pic- 
ture patrons," has been well received dur- 
ing its first weeks. The program changes 
Friday to Douglas Fairbanks in "The 
Gaucho." 

* * * 

It is understood that last week's warm 
weather had a beneficial effect on the box 
offices of Chicago theatres. 



LET US MAKE 
YOUR SPECIAL 

TRAILERS 



We Specialize in Making 
Trailers from Your Copy 

ALL ORDERS 
SHIPPED SAME 
DAY RECEIVED 

Send Us Your Next Order 




OUR COPY 
WRITING 
DEPART- 
MENT 
WILL 
WRITE 
YOUR 
TRAILER 
COPY ABSO- 
LUTELY 
FREE — 
NO OBLIGA- 
TION 



FILMACK Co.^izrf 



specify Prints 
on Eastman Film 

The commanding position 
which Eastman film occupies to- 
day has been won by years of 
consistently high quality, backed 
by years of cooperation with 
the industry. 

To get the highest possible 
photographic quality on your 
screen, always specify prints on 
Eastman Positive. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 





in any FoxTbeatres 




My. Fox, one of the founders 
of as well as one of the leaders 
in the motion picture industry, 
has long been noted for his 
penetrating foresight. When 
the Sentry Safety Control was 
brought to his attention, he 
quickly decided to utilize now 
what some day everyone will 
have. His decision was made 
as soon as he was convinced 
that the device provided 100% 
safety from film fires for his 
patrons and employes. 



William Fox has agreed to install 
SENTRY SAFETY CONTROL 
[the positive fire -preventer] in each 
of the FOX CIRCUIT THEATRES; 
also in all his laboratories and studios. 

Such an endorsement of SENTRY 
SAFETY CONTROL by such a man 
tells its own story. 




canpanATl□^ 



13th and Cherry Sts., PHILADELPHIA 1560 Browlway, NEW YORK 

And All Branches of 
NATIONAL THEATRE SUPPLY COMPANY 

X The positive lire preventer )^ 



C an be attached to any projec tor. Costs only a few cents a day; 



EXHI 



TOM 



1 i 


' 1 








^1 














A 




J ^ 


L ) 




L ) 










IN 




ORLD 



WE CAN AFFORD TO GET GOOD 
AND BOILED. BUSINESS IS GREAT! 



Metro-QoWwyn-Mayer 
e^doitors get fun out 
of life! 

Every week another happy hit: "BEN HUR," 
"BIG PARADE," "MAN, WOMAN AND SIN" 
{Gilbert), "FAIR CO-ED" (Davies), "LONDON 
AFTER MIDNIGHT" (Chaney) are just a few. 
Now comes "WEST POINT" (Haines), "BABY 
MINE'^ (Dane-Arthur), "DIVINE WOMAN" 
{Garbo) and remember that while Broadway pays 
$2 your folks get simultaneously; 





■ the student r 


THE 


1 PRINCE 1 


ENEM V 



THE rage of LUBITSCH triumph CAPACITY at $2 

BROADWAY at $2. COMES to you ASTOR, N. Y. 

BREAKING records FROM 4 months YOU get it 

EVERYWHERE now\ ON B'way at $2 SIMULTANEOUSLY 




-G- 




kI. V^l an XT « /ir i ki «\ Entered as tecond-class matter, Augmt 20, 1917, at tht Pott Office at Chicago, 111., under the act of March 3, . ». 4a«« 

m VM. VU, no, 3 (VoL OZ, no. f ) m9. PubUthed weekly at 407 South Demrhom St.. Chicago. Subtcription $3.00 a year. Single copies, 25 cents. Januvy 21, IKES 




^ \\\\\ ^ \ 



iri 



I. 



I 



i^^^>!i^^«v^^N «s^>J 



m 



fi . JACK 



The -fRazEffm 



One of the 24 

CEM/* PROM 
TIPFflNy-yTflHL 



By ALBERT 
TMELBV LEVINO 



Qhc'Bcttcr t^ntertttinment 



TIFFANY- STAHL P R O D U C T I O N S,/^c. 

M.H.HOFFMAN, VICE PRES. 

1540 BROADWAY NEW YORK CITY 



January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



intimate box-office glimpses of ParAMOUNT'S 

Gentlemen prefer blondes 




THE BOOK THAT STARTED IT. 
Over a million copies sold to date. 
Translated into every language, includ- 
ing the Scandinavian. 



4 



EXfflBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 21, 1928 




GUS EISMAN. The Button 
King who^educa ted" Lorelei. 
Played by Ford Sterling. 




MALCOLM ST. CLAIR. Di- 

rector of '^'Gentlemen Prefer 
Blondes" with Anita Loo8 
and Ruth Taylor. 




"NOBODY WILL WANT TO 
MARRY ME!" sobs Lorelei. 
And another sucker bites the 
dust 





MEN, BEWARE! Lorelei and 
Dorothy stalking males on 
the deck of an ocean liner. 



MR. SPOFFORD. The mil- 
lionaire reformer hooked 
by Lorelei. On the screen 
Holmes Herbert. 



GENTLEMEN 
PREFER BLONDES 

A Paramount Picture 

From the famous story by Anita Loos and the 
play by Anita Loos and John Emerson. Hector 
TurnbuU Production, directed by Malcolm St. Clair. 




DIMPLED DYNAMITE. The gimme girls of "Gentlemen Preler Blondes" 
Warm lips but hearts of ice. 



January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



5 




"NICE BUT UNREFINED". So 
says Lorelei of her girl friend 
Dorothy (Alice White), brunette 
in "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes". 




OLD BUT OH, MY! An 
eighteen year old mind in a 
sixty year old chassis — Mrs. 
Spoifard (Trixie Friganza). 




''I WANT TO GO TO 
PARIS". Mr. Eisman, her 
"educator," says "No". So she 
goes to Paris — and how! 



book it the 


same month with 


"BEAU 


SABREUR 


LAST 




PARAMOUNT'S 


New Era Specials! 





SIR FRANCIS BEEKMAN. 
Loosening him from a dia- 
mond tiara was Lorelei's 
greatest single feat (Mack 
Swain). 




500 LETTERS A DAY. So great is popular interest in "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" 
that Ruth Taylor (Lorelei), previously an unknown, has to wheel her daily mail. 



LUCKY AUTHORS. Anita Loos 
and John Emerson made so much 
money from "Gentlemen Prefer 
Blondes" that they've retired. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 21, 1928 



STAGE 



BROADWAY 



SCREEN 




VOL. LXXXIX. No. 12 



NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 4, 1928 



180 PAGES 



LEADING FILM STARS OF '11 



LAUGHED WISE 
MEN AWAY FROM 
, FREAK 



First Night Etiquette 



The fashlonahJe dictum on 
opening nights se«£as to be de- 
pendent upon location ot seats. 
If In front of "T^" tuxedo or. 
evening dress. Behind 



REllTlfiim 
N ALL COMPilES 



'Igh 'Ats in GAUery 



High-hat trade In the gallery 
and baloonj' of the Maxlne El- 
liott Is n^w the order o£ things 
for "Coquette," where the car- 
riage trade porks its bodies aa 
t he onlSL_alteraaiUvB..i;<tt_J»fiJs_ef. 



TALKING FILMS 



Tom Gorman at \ 
tected H. M. I 



'.-.^ l .iinson at it 
;. by Eeltk- 
- attheAlbd 
week. Th 
'b'lowed" an 
'.i^?e»v at %i 

.■•c Lin, the Hi 
'i < nsiderabl6 i\ 
lon a reprei 
!!or Fottndat 
ing Sing at 
ne Americai 
;i Co., with \ 
■.islted the 
r». With s 
' they want 

s. 1 lb about. W 

u{ile out of turn| 
^u... '13 emild teach Ruth 
Jl'-fu-y Judd Gray how j 
c'octric chair. Gorman! 
old showmanship and 
*ommittee out of it. 

Gorman's simple &tai 
AJter all It was a theati 
tion was graciously acc4 
Visitors. j 
Emdo's Dikcov 
John.^on is said to 
up aa a. brand new fr< 
H. M. Emde, manager { 
Newark, N. J., a K-A b( 
film house. Bmrie in sj 
fXTsi.'ited. despite dlsc| 
nr.1t played the tun; 
th(;ntro. ! 

John.son was then sonl 
,&a a -tcBt and vindica 
judgment. 1 
Emde ia also said toj 
the NeT^^irk man,: 
put over the beat 
the show bu.>ilnoN8 had 
inonths, and at a total 
theatre of but $30, 



Cf 



FOR 16 M. HOME 
•pORS 



K'<er v* 
?at stra 



100 Years 



Provldonoe ",Ioumal" 
t>rlntcrl an article on No 
aires from the "IVlanuffi 
Farm'-j-y',.,)c,.tirnal," whii 
fcec. ►183'?o iOT). ycar« 
The, "tiiry,. in part, »a 
"No^ York, at the 5 
jlap^o^l'!i;»^ou^ thoatraa 
Ssaduth ■"■ij-'ai-votrd tott 
■ran,; , . The nuir 



^^Top Notch honors with 
Paramount, of course, 
having the edge " 

^ ^^As in 1926, Harold 
Lloyd is still the leader 
of all stars in all companies." 

^ ^^Then, again, coming 
after Lloyd, Paramount 
has a great bet in Clara 
Bow " 



istol. Wealthy 
jwUl Finance 
k Device 

pictures on 1< tnn*. 
« and schools is th* 
un H. Bristol, mll- 
r and manntsicturer 
Conn. Bristol ha» 
kins picture devic* 
lapted to the small 

L 

«iulred the non-the- 
) James A. Fitipat- 
Maater" serlea.. \ At 
made only one In- 
Waterbury theatr«^ 
[phone ■w&a demon- 
reeka a^o before th» 
ute of Philadelphia 
1 th«i Inventor with 

10 Adjustment 
es he can get th» 
cheap as the cost 
:ad© radios. In this 
[ctures for the home 
cal possibility, 
.one is said to con- 
,ot possessed by any 
md devices, namely, 
tistment in case the 
at out of syucluronl- 
>t necessary to stop 
id on page 



Pictures 
ust Have Help 

woman's organiza- 
regular Wednesday 
ig at the Hotel As- 
fel (Ro-ty) made th« 
motion pictur<?8- 
ntatlon -by acta or 
re doomed; that a 
annot hold its o-im 
nding .«cas:e bilU 
borated on tlio radio 
al Blgniflcance and 
I..' ■ ■ . ■ 

among a list o* 
ossing the club that 
ling Madge HJ>'an«, 
1 GIlda.Grarf.,.- . , 
laid pressed.' ' ' • 



January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



V « K I E T y 



Wednesday, January 1, 1928 



1 



LEADING FILM STARS OF 1927 



(.CoutiDuetl l'n>m p^ige 3) 
tricts tailing in line imiiiofliately 
sfterward. 

Estatlishraeiit oi the vnliie of 
these new peoi>lo in tlio foreign ter- 
ritory Is rather slow, espeoially in 
the Alrican ana Asiatic ter ritor y. 
Tliere the people seem 
loyal to their old favorf 
- quite reluctant to tral| 
new ones until they h; 
considerable number ot i 
efforts. Then. even, tliej 
a -warm spot for the olj 
keep on. patronixiiij? \ 
whei-e their prorttiot i* 

Pieliing- up ot the old i 
tlie forte of the indepc 
ducers, with the main d 
by then so far as these 
concerned from the fore 
as well as the Amerlenij 
distrieta. There are mnn 
player-? who have pa.ssed 
big parade to trudge aloi 
minors with still an uinji 
following". That ma4<es , 
for tliem to eommand j 
payment for their service 
producer, as well as str, 
tieing and expk*itatJon \ 
tiires they woric in, j 
Why Uloyd Leai 

As in 1926, Harold IA\ 
the leader of all stars xi 
pariies. This despite he i 
<»tit only one picture for | 



While, on the other hand, Metro- 
{ Ooldwyn-Mayer slipped by the way- 
side, trailing these companies, other 
tlian M-G-M's huge gross returns 
since Labor Day. That has been 
caused by "Bis Parade" and "Ben- 
riur." 



the leader In sales by a wide mar- 
gin. Of eotirfie, his plottires are not 
getting as wide a circulation as they 
had two or three years ago. The 
Mix brand ia used by the company 
in many Instances to "bait" ths ex- 
hibitors into buying other program 



tumping- right into the lead. He 
will be in 1928 listed among the star 
group «nd probably give those In 
that column a ran. Also strong In 
this class are Chester ConMIn, Noah 
Beery (now off the payroll), Olive 
Brook and Ford Sterling. 

Of the featured women Para- 
mount had little to boast of, with 
Mary Brian the leader. Added is 
EvebTi Brent, who hopped into the 
big league from tlie F. B. O. rank.s 
and eorraled a following quiclily 
through her work In "Underworld." 



and 



'Paramount, with its road shows 
and super-specials, such as ^Wings' 
'Underworld' and 'The Way of All 
Flesh' is rather a proud and aggressive 



one picture each ai-e the leaders, 
however. With n^oro circulation 
during- the coming j-e.ar the drawing 
power of the stars with U. A. may 
see a change. Corinno Griiflth 
though listed with U. A. can li.^rdly 
be cliLSsiried a-'> she as yet has not 
had a release. Butter Keaton had 
a few but they got nowli'-n-. -with 
the Gllda. Gray pii-ture just getting 
Bt.wted on the ll^t and ha-ving 
played little to warrant any .sort of 
grading as to her valine -witJi this 
company. 

~"teature clo:.-.-^ r><.h);-t-s Bel 
Id LaRoquc iS a ■ .>'iibina- 
[ in the vane:iiar'l, Lt3. 
really to bo x-lassiiiod ad 
[ was starred in "F.esur- 
Irith Mis.i r).3l Klo. Th<t 
not bo given as substan.- 
|g as she deseives. as she 
forking in tile product ot 
ipanlcs, such as making 

their heels oome another 
ouis WoUieim and Wm; 
'^y 3ust made one picture) 
from- start and looks !lkd 
maker. Boyd, again doe^ 
illy belong In this group 
loaned from De Mill* for 
Ot the v. A. single fea- 
9 Gilbert Rowland Is the 



organization. 



9? 



M Lon Chaney Is stlB 
fder, Chaney Is the best 
et that company, has had 
Dduct drawing bigger rc». 



STARS 



''Of the male stars, Richard Dix 
has been the most substantial 



HAROLD LLO 
CLARA BOW| 
RICHARD Dt)< 
POLA NEGRll 
BEERY- HATTOj 
BEBE DANIEL 
EMIL JANNING 
ADOLPHE MENJ 
GLORIA SWANSi 
THOMAS MEIGH 
FRED THOMSO 
ESTHER RALSTi 
FLORENCE VID( 
RAYMOND GRIFF 
DOUGLAS MACLt 
W. C. FIELDS 
EDDIE CANTO 
JACK HOLT 
ED. WYNN 



money 
Hatton 
heels. 



earner. 



with 
combination 



the Beery 
right on 



and 
his 



9? 



Featured 

George Bancroft 
Chester Conklin 
Noah Beery 
Clive Brook 
Ford Sterling 
Mary Brian 
William Powell 
Betty Bronson 
Evelyn Brent 



New Taient, 

James Hall 
Louise Brooks 
Charles Rogers, - 
Fay Wray 
Gary Cooper 
Lane Chandler 
Jack Luden 
Thebna Todd 
Rich"rd Arlen . 



'Bebe Daniels and Adolphe 
Menjou, with nominal-priced pro- 
ductions, proved themselves Valuable' 
money -getters for the organization." 



arff et y. 

ills year. His old produ(^|/botl 



this 

with Para: 
manai 



_ both 

ount and Pathe, Btill 
make the rot#d3i_ In 




gauged for this resume, as but few 
of their product got a chance to cir- 
culate during the last six months 
of 1927.' For the 1938 rating, the 
standing of -tlieee nlayers will un 
doubtedly be much Higher, as their 
t -m^ nijmtitum 
rl 



few 100 per cent, sellers among th^ 
stars, but I.,loyd gets over 
cou nt of consj;.*ent repeating of hi 



that Ch; 
per 
as releai 
last se\i 







Vrh th'; nrodueers have beer 
hat their 'SC-'ST p-.od- 
best ever, the puMiC has 
the-guiK>^ t^^as.ht4:)l 
tmt»aniS B^w ckli 
'ar as fll'HlKT^ fffcrSlit 
id yeai', with Far-amount 
nning about 'neck .and 



err^^Wa'rket 

The Western fteld, on the other 
hand, was all shot to pieces duri 
the past year. With big key 

u.see 

'Saturd3W"d W<^d: 

smaller quantity of production was 
done in this field during the year, 
^-iber of Western 
have 
as a result, 
t the pa.^ 
Holt, I 
re no 1^ 
fnite, 
'aracter 
odtictioi) 
tried 



they decide" 
liirow their entire selling organiza- 
tion behind the pred Thomson prod- 
|ict. Par got off to a g.oo9 start 
••ItlaSrhi 



bit by bit. 

Though Gloria Swanson has been 
away from Par for over a year, her 
old product Is Btlll making the 
rounds and mhowing good retiims. 
Douglas Macljean. another 
ster, 

elflrHls ItandS^'ot thi 

■for. 

Bebe. S&niels^hd Adolphe Mcn- 
Jou, -with nomfluLl priced produc- 
tions, proved TJemaelves "valuable" 
ey getMfS ■oLth^^crganizal 
red oflthB^rvpiwe of 

pr< 

against tha^ of eome of the atai-s 
who needed the expensive and lav- 
ishly mounted etories to get 




bear watching during 192S. It looks 
as though she will click heavily and 
land In the Btar gi*oup. Another 
youngster in this class who will 
;ogres3 fast In the new year is 
ce WTiite. ~ 



any of the Individual 
;i>ut. This, too, is due 
/ to the Mralted cost" of. 
production, while much 
■more IB spfent on products ot other 
stars. 

Norma Shearer and Johii Gilbert - 
are close to each other in dra-w 
value, -with LUUiin Gish now away 
from the company, cashin^ln on 
several of her previou* enRavors 
■h'Srteti]C~k>m'SlSd "Wf-ii' 



one Into tlie . key 
houses,- -where Thoniion 



it begi 
also th' 

case -with W. C. Fields, who prob- 
ably will shine during 192S -wlien 
Christie releases through 
nnlmtion 



b02£ office fgogle. New to the screen 
and amdunttng^ to nothing in the 
check--ap, Ba Wynn etands-iat tho 




mtion "Mlie's PuncturB Ho- _1 
lljKU .nool^a^ead 




OCA 



Features &f 



VOCAFILM 

of Interest to YOU 



TON£— The quality of tone of the music and sound 
effects is as near perfect as the highest development 
of the best modern methods of recording and am- 
plification can make it. In music, the tones are rich, 
full and true. In effects, the utmost realism is 
achieved. 

SYNCHRONIZATION— VictuTcs and sound are 
perfectly synchronized and protected against the 
slightest deviation from pcrfea harmony. 

5/M PL/C/TY—Vocafilm is so simple that no 
technical help or extra help of any kind is required 
for its operation. Any motion piaure operator can 
handle it easily with one day's instruaion and 
operation. 

COST— The cost is surprisingly low, by far the 
lowest of any pictures-and -sound device on the 
market. No service fees, seat tax or extra fees of 
any kind are charged. Upkeep cost is negligible. 

TERMS— The terms of payment are within the 
reach of practically every theatre, the smallest as 
well as the largest. 




cAnnouncement 
ubixut 

VOCAFILM will soon be available to every theatre through the 
Educational Exchanges in the United States and Canada. 

The introduction of VOCAFILM to the American exhibitor marks the 
beginning of a new era in theatre music and entertainment in sound 
generally. This simple device for the synchronization of motion pic- 
tures and sound achieves a beauty of tone and a perfection of synchronization that are a revcla- 
■ tion. Its ease and simplicity of operation and economy in original cost and maintenance make it 

I practical for any house, anywhere. Thus there is brought to the smallest town the highest type of 

^ "acts" and of musical entertainment synchronized with pictures that is possible to the greatest 

theatre on New York's Broadway. 

Announcement will be made soon of the details of Educational's release schedule of VOCAFILM 
' "acts" and pictures synchronized with music through VOCAFILM. 



Ask your Educational Exchange for information as to the cost of VOCAFILM to your theatre. You 
will be amazed at the low initial cost, the easy terms of payment, and the practically negligible 
cost of maintenance. 





EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 21, 1928 




"Exquisite in its natural coloring . . . a fine 
short subject"- MOTION PICTURE NEWS 



"Beautifully done" — 

MOTION PICTURES TODAY 



PRES ENTS 



Hope Hampton 

A strange and fascinating legend of the South Seas i . . as luring as the 
relentless urge of the mermaid-infested emerald seas which it depicts 
. . . beautifully done in all the natural colors of its tropical setting. 

A feature classic in two reels, with feature press sheet, feature ads and 
accessories and musical synopsis. 





EDUCATIONAL FILM EXCHANGES. Inc. E. W. Mammons, President 

Member. Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America. Inc.. Will H. Hayt. President. 



January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



11 



Here It Is! 



The first 
of the new 




COMEDIES 



It Is 



It 



It-y 



What 

Motion picture News 

Says: 

Charley Bowers' first 
comedy for Educational 
is a corker for ingenuity 
and unexpected surprises. 
Charley's active brain 
has worked overtime 
thinking up all the many 
little things that relate 
to the "h" which plays 
so important a part in the 
comedy. . . This Bowers 
comedy is as different 
from the average slapstick 
affair as an apple is from 
a pineapple. It is a differ- 
ent sort of comedy and 
one which is enhanced in 
effectiveness by means of 
Bowers' process of fooling 
you with camera tricks. 



And, Boy I 
It's 

There! 



Ay 



Vs 



fitst 



IS 



does 



Vvav^^ 



What 

MOTION Pictures Today 

Says : 

The first of a new series, this Charley 
Bowers novelty comedy is a droll and 
vastly amusing one. . . . For downright 
insanity, whimsically, charmingly and sur- 
prisingly contrived, this release is in a 
class by itself. Solemn reviewers went so 
far as to laugh aloud at it. 



atv 

Vt 

s' 



Vvave 



to 



see 



to 



Seldom, if ever, has a new 
comedy series been offered 
that has met with such a 
prompt and enthusiastic 
welcome from the critics 



YouVe just got 
to step out and 
get these^ 



atVve 



ate 



jOO*' 



Vau#^ 
^uVVet^ 



Vvas 



Vxave 



tVve -Wttots 



eat 



EDUCATIONAL 
FILM EXCHANGES, Inc. 



,\tVv- 



/rfen( 



"THE SPICE OFTHE PROGRAM" 



Member, Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America. Inc., Will H. Hays, President 



12 EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD January 21, 1928 

WARNER BROS. 

Supreme Triumph 



£1^ 




January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



13 



Playing to 

A Million People a WeeK 
BreaKin^ All Records In 



FROM 

HAROLD B. FRANKLIN 




FROM 



GBORGE W.TRENDLE 



Warner Theatre, New York 
Grand Central, St. Louis 
Globe, Kansas City 
Madison, Detroit 
Grand, Columbus 
Imperial, Jacksonville 
Strand, Schenectady 
Metropolitan, Washington 
New Broadway, Charlotte 
Grand, Hazleton 
Arcade, West Pahn Beach 



Fox Locust, Philadelphia 
Blue Mouse, Seattle 
Blue Mouse, Portland 
Blue Mouse, Tacoma 
Liberty, Spokane 
Arcadia, Reading 
Metropolitan, Baltimore 
Savoy, Wilkes-Barre 
Phiel, St. Petersburg, Fla. 



Garrick, Chicago 
Criterion, Los Angeles 
Strand, Scranton 
Vita Temple, Toledo 
Garden, Milwaukee 
Capitol, Richmond 



And One Hundred Other Cities Day and Date 

Jhrittini the World/ 



14 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



One of the finest and 
stion^est pictuies that 
have come to us' 




" Easily lanhed as one of 
die best . Most absorbing 

achievement in screen 

realism " — - 




January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



15 



AFFIDAVIT 



^!£SlA. Miller of» t 

" "^0^ ^ -^-=.a. 

all Pooerds of i,u«ir.«„ , ' m possession of 

said theatre sincsa i + » 
Tliat the Willi«„ r- ^ opening, 

by F w u " P-oductlon Of -Sunrise" 

^- Mzmau. has for the fi^^^t n ' 
-^Pasae. .ii ^^^^^ ^ of its e,a.e.ent. 

^ore establisted since the ^^^'t- 

t.e produo °: ^^^^^ ^^-^^ — • 
--re .0... ^..:z^':r ^-^"^ 

5th week of its run. ' completed the 

That its receiTH-o 
or a like p^.j^ n» 
Heaven... ve.,. ,„.,^„„ ""^X". "n. 



day 0 



Affiant . 

^:***<-*«xt<v Tooo — =2-:::: 




1938. 



»otary Public l„ and ^;n;;7X;r— 




geles. 




THE ONE GREAT INDEPENDEMl 




RICHARD 



BARTHELMESS 



BREAKS RECORD 
BY $2,000.00 

at the TantheonSToiedo. 

First National's Great 
Road-show Hit 
Released Direct to YOU ! 



STAND OUT 
WEDNESDi 



MORE ON 
MONDAY 



SELL-OUT 
SUNDAY 



WESTE 



TELt 




RECORD 
TUESDAY 




WEST^m UNION 



Toledo, Ohio, Jan. 1 

Ned E. Depinet, N.Y. 
Opening day receipts on Patent 
Leather Kid most money in his- 
tory of theatre in a single day. 

JOHN F. KUMLER 

Pantheon Theatre 



Toledo, Ohio) Jan. 2 
Ned E. Depinet, N.Y. 
Am doing much larger business 
and getting higher admission 
prices than widely advertised 
feature which opened at the prin- 
cipal opposition house yesterday. 

JOHN F. KUMLER 

Pantheon Theatre 



Toledo, Ohio, Jan. 3 
Ned E. Depinet, N.Y. 
Have taken in more money with 
Patent Leather Kid on First Two 
Days than on any picture ever 
played in the Pantheon. 

JOHN P. KUMLER 



Were compelled to refund admis- 
sion money to standout line and 
stop sale of tickets several times 
today. 



JOHN F. KUMLER 

Pantheon Theatre 





RICHARD A.ROWUND 



ROWUND RUPERT HUGHE J 

ciiALFRED SAHTELLt>^9^^ 



THE 



PATENT LEATHER KID 



HELD OVER 
SATURDAY 
FOR INDEFINITI 



FIGHTING 
FRI DAY 



TURNAWAY 
THURSDAY. 



WESTE; 
TEL 





UNION 



RAM 







WESTER UNION 
















TEL^-'ilAM 





Toledo, Ohio, Jan. 5 
A Ned E. Depinet, N.Y. 

Theatre open seventeen hours 
and compelled to run overtime 
until after midnight. 

JOHN F. KUMLER 

PantKeon Theatre 



Toledo, Ohio, Jan. 6 
Ned E. Depinet, N.Y. 

Patrons fighting to get inside and 
fighting for seats. They can't get 
enough of it even with seven 
shows a day. j^^^ p KUMLER 

Pantheon Theatre 



Toledo, Ohio, Jan. 7 
Ned E. Depinet, N.Y. 

Patent Leather Kid's first week 
has broken Pantheon's record by 
Two Thousand Dollars. Am hold- 
ing it over indefinitely. 

JOHN F. KUMLER 




|6 WEEKS <^/iBROADWAY/r/2'-'T0P 

7 WEEKS Ik CHICAGO atim TOP 
6 WEEKS ^ DETROIT 

And every day of its first first-run at 
popular prices piles up the proof that 

has one of the big money-hits of all time 
in "THE PATENT LEATHER KID" 



ALFRED sImTEU 

TITLES BY GERALD C.DUFFY 



Prockdimmmaqmodr 

AL^ROCKETT 

SCENARIO BY WINIFRED DUNN 



18 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 21, 1928 




"-SO WE PUT IN STAN 
LAUREL AND OLIVER HARDY 
AND PANICKED THE HOUSE-" 




**I predict that Stan Laurel 
and Oliver Hardy will be 
the most popular comedy 
pair in pictures. 





COMEDY PRODUCER FOR 



WHEREVER film men meet 
today they talk of Metro* 
Goldwyn-Mayer^s achievements 
in the short subject field. 

The marvelous reception of Stan 
Laurel and Oliver Hardy again 
proves the unquestioned superi- 
ority of Hal Roach comedies* 

WITH M'G'M News amazing 
its competitors — with 
M-G'M*s Great Events and Ufa 
Oddities playing in thousands of 
theatres, M-G-M*s Shorts are truly 
the talk of the industry. 

METRO-GO 





STAN LAUREL ana OLIVER 

HARDY in "The Battle of the 
Century," and "Leave 'Em 
La-ughing" are even funnier than 
in "The Second Hundred Years." 



-MAYER 





Universal's Twenty- 
second Anniversary 
Celebration in honor 
of its chief and found- 
er, Carl Laemmle — 
the most impressive 
event of the coming 
season for exhibitors 
throughout the 
world. 

Y 



in its importance to exhibitors through- 
out the country is this 22nd Anniversary 
Celebration because it brings to the Trade 
the greatest individual block of box office 
pictures at the most important season of 
the year. 

In this 22nd Anniversary Celebration 
we present the biggest single group of 
money makers ever offered by any one 
company, in any one season, in the en- 
tire history of the motion picture business. 

We've tipped the balance scales over 
backwards to give you the break. 

Heretofore there have been drives — 
drives for this and drives for that — but 
never before have vou ever heard of a 
drive put on for YOU the Exhibitor — 
a drive that benefits the exhibitor first. 

To prove this 22 nd Anniversary Cele- 
bration is for you — here, on the next 
page, is a partial list of the product 
available to you during this Celebration. 



We could talk for hours, but all 
arguments fall flat along-side of this 
remarkable line-up of pictures, which tops 
by miles, anything this entire industry has 
ever seen in one period in the high spot of 
the season. 



Universal' s 
Amazing Four 

The Cat and the Canary 
Les Miserables 

The Cohens and Kellys in Paris 
We Americans 

— and its Resplendent Fifth 
Love Me and theWorld is Mine 

Glenn Tryon Pictures 

Painting the Town 
A Hero for a Night 
Hot Heels 

Back to God's Country 
The Lone Eagle 
The Shield of Honor 
Cheating Cheaters 
The Chinese Parrot 
The Small Bachelor 
Surrender! 
The 13th Juror 
Wild Beauty 
The Irresistible Lover 
A Man's Past 
The Fourflusher 
Alias the Deacon 
Midnight Rose 
13 Washington Sq. 



Reginald Denny Pictures 

That's My Daddy 
Out All Night 
On Your Toes 

Laura La Plante Pictures 

Silk Stockings 

Finders Keepers 

Thanks for the Buggy Ride 

Hoot Gibson Pictures 
Painted Ponies 
Galloping Fury 
The Rawhide Kid 
A Trick of Hearts 

Universal Super Shorts 

Snookums,The box office baby 
Universal Junior Jewels 
Carl Laemmle, Jr's. 

The Collegians 

Universal Junior Jewels 

Oswald the lucky Rabbit— 

1 reel cartoons 
Snappy 1 Reel Comedies 
The Gumps 

Stern Brothers 2 Reelers 
including Mike and Ike 
Keeping Up with the Joneses 
Let George Do it and 

Buster Brown 
Octavus Roy Cohen 
Charlie Puffy — 2 Reelers 

2 Reel Western Dramas 
tiniversal Super Serials 



Universal Salesman will call on you 
soon. Give him your undivided attention. 



WATCH 

UNIVERSAL 




Carl Laemmle's 22nd Anniversary Celebration 
January 22nd to May 5th, 1928 




EXHIBITORS' Hallelujah Chorus! 

Sweeping The Countrsr With 

Its Contagious 
Harmony! 





The Kennedy- 
F ebr uar y - Jubi- 
lee is tiie Siiow- 
mens' Event of 
the Season! The 
Whole Trade is 
Dancing to the 
Rhafisody 
in Gold! 



Three Mighty Notes 
in the Jubilee Serenade! 

JOSEPH P. KENNEDY presents 

CHICAGO AFTER 
MIDNIGHT 

with Ralph Ince 

[ just in from the coast and a wallop ] 

LEGIONAIRES IN 
PARIS 

with Cooke and Guard 

[ jazzing up box-offices everywhere ] 

CONEY ISLAND 

with Lois Wilson 

carnival show flush in the market ] 



24 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 21, 1928 




EXHIBITORS 



HERMD 

an* MOVING PICTURE 

WORLD 

Is the only Audit 
Bureau of Circulations 
paper in the motion 
picture Held 



YANKEE enterprise has accomplished a 
great deal in the past hundred years. There 
are substitutes for almost everything — false 
teeth, silk hair, wooden legs, metal skulls, wax 
noses, synthetic gin, paper leather, etc., ad 
infinitum. ... 

But a hundred years in the publishing industry 
has failed to discover a substitute for BONA 
FIDE, PAID CIRCULATION. The only one on 
the market today is the first one ever used. 
CONVERSATION is the polite term for it, but 
more accurate terms for it are — "hooey", 
bunk , baloney and applesauce . 

Any business concern that refuses to make a 
statement to Dunn or Bradstreet has a reason. 

And any publication that declines to make a 
statement to the Audit Bureau of Circulations 
also has a reason. 



IT is hardly good business to have auditors 
check up on carbon paper, lead pencils, 
paper clips, and every other supply purchased 
to be sure of getting full count, and then fail to 
insist upon something besides CONVERSA- 
TION from publications soliciting advertising. 



I %ewisnosubstituteMraihiion/ 



The 
Independent 
Film Trade 
Paper 



EXHIBITORS 

HERALD 



i MOVING PICTURE 



WORLD 



Home 
Office: 
407 So. Dearborn St. 
Chicago 



IN THIS ISSUE 



Exhibitors tell what changes they would make if starting over today — Lines form for finish fight on 
Brookhart bill to prohibit block booking — Church club plans shows on Sundays only, leasing exhib- 
itors' theatres, in battle with bluenoses at Emporia, Kan. ; attendance will be limited to membership 
in novel organization. 



COMPLETE INDEX TO CONTENTS 



NEWS 



Newspaper champions presentation at New Orleans; Says public 
has recorded its judgment by flocking to theatres showing stage 
acts. 

Livewire Texas exhibitors build box-office by helping com- 
munities; Successful houses have outstanding citizens as owners. 
Film, stage and concert combine in Greenwich Village theatre 
opening February 12 — Lou Kramer dies — Theatre is bombed. 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

FILM AND EQUIPMENT— Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Tiffany-Stahl, 
Paramount, Educational, Warner Brothers, United Artists, Fox, 
First National, Universal, F B O, Al Cohn, Al Martin, John Stone, 
Mark Sandrich, Jules White, United Studios, Philip Bartholomae, 
Mole-Richardson, Rufus McCosh and Dwinnelle Benthall, Madge 
Bellamy, Eastman Kodak, Lumas. 

PRESENTATION— Maxwell and Lee, Billy Snyder, Milton 
Slosser, Harold Daniels, McNeil Smith, Jerome H. Remick & Co., 
Baby Dot Johnson, Heller and Riley, Ray Turner, Ed Meikel, 
Ulderico MarceUi, Villa Moret, Brooks Costumes, Dave Gould, 
Ransley Studios, Verne Buck, Edward House, Don Pedro 
Espinosa, Bill Bennett, Eddie Hanson, Lou Kosloff, Jimmy Bell, 
Bob Billings, Ken Anderson. 



FEATURES 

Service Talks by T. 0. Service 61 

Los Angeles by Ray Murray 46 

Re-Takes 34 

Pictorial Section 37 

Letters from Readers 69 

Broadway 30 

New York by John S. Spargo 40 

DEPARTMENTS 

The Studio 45 

Live News from Coast to Coast 65 

Short Features 59 

Presentation Acts 51 

The Theatre 62 

New Pictures 66 

Press Sheets ...... 67 

Quick Reference Picture Chart. 78 

Classified Advertising 70 

What the Picture Did for Me. 71 

The Box Office Ticker 68 



CHICAGO 

407 Sooth Dearborn St. Telephones Harrison 0036-37-38 
Cablo Address: Qnigpnbco 
EDWIN S. CLIFFORD, Cenerol Meautger 

JAY M. SHRKCK, Managing Editor 
GEOBCE CLIFFORD, Business Manager 
ERNEST A. ROVELSTAD, News Editor 

LOS ANGELES 

5617 Hollywood Blvd. Telephone Gladstone S7S4 

RAY MURRAY, Manager 
DOUCLAS HODGES, Advertising Manager 



EDITORIAL 
AND 
ADVERTISING 
OFFICES 



NEW YORK 

565 Fifth Avenue Telephones 'Vanderblll 3613-3613 

JAMES BEECROFT, Manager 
JOHN S. SPARGO, Nete York New Editor 

LONDON 
THE BIOSCOPE 
(J. Caboum, Editor) 
Faraday House 
8-10 Charing Cross Rd., W. C. 2 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: United States and possessions — $3.00 por year. Canada — $4.50 per year. Other points ef the world — S6.00 par year. 

Advertising rate cards and Audit Bureau of Circulations statements furnished upon application. 



Single copies, 25 eoBta. 



26 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS 

HERALD 

asi MOVING PICTURE 

WORLD 

Martin J. Quigley, Publisher ^Editor 

Incorporating Exhibitoks Herald, founded in 191S; Moving Pic- 
ture World, founded in 1907; Motography, founded in 1909; and 
The Film Index, founded in 1909 

Published Erery Wednesday by 
QuiGLEY Publishing Company 
Publication Office: 407 So. Dearborn St., CHICAGO, U. S. A. 
Martin J. Quigley, Presidetit 
Edwin S. Clifford, Secretary George Clifford, Asst. Treasurer 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
Copyright, 1928, by Quigley Publishing Company 
All editorial and business correspondence 
should be addressed to the Chicago oSSce 
Other Publications: The Chicagoan and Polo, class journals; and the follow- 
ing motion picture trade publications published as supplements to Exhibitors 
HnALD and Moving Picture World: Better Theatres, every fourth week, and 
Ts» Box Office Record & Equipment Index, semi-annual. 

Whole Vol. 90, No. 3 . (Vol. 32, No. 6) January 21, 1928 

Again — The Alarmists 

EVERY trade has its alarmists and the motion picture 
trade is not without its full share of those persons 
who delight to sound a note of approaching calamity. 

Right now motion picture trade alarmists are speaking 
loudly and vacantly about the injury which they say will 
be done to the show business through the introduction 
of motion pictures via the radio. The fact that all the 
leading scientists agree that the day is at least far distant 
when motion pictures can be practicably transferred by 
radio does not slacken the ardor of the alarmists. 

When radio itself became practical this same type of 
person became obsessed with the fear that with the widen- 
ing popularity of radio entertainment the theatre would 
drop into an insignificant position in the amusement 
world. But it may now be seen that radio, despite its vast 
development, has not undermined the position of the 
theatre in the amusement world but, instead, has created 
a niche of its own. Radio has not hurt the theatre and 
will not hurt the theatre, for the very plain reason that it 
is not a competitor of theatrical entertainment. 

Regardless of when and how a development may come 
which will make possible and practicable the transmission 
of motion pictures by radio — and enable the public to see 
motion pictures in their own homes — the theatre will 
never be compelled to yield its premier position in the 
amusement world. 

Private viewing of pictures can never supplant the 
natural himian desire of mankind to assemble in numbers 
for a common enjoyment of entertainment. The psychol- 
ogy of crowds is an all-important factor in the enjoyment 
of entertainment and just so long as humanity lasts there 
will be public places in which men and women may gather 
for the purpose of being entertained. 

The radio, because it is an attraction for the public, has 
had an eflfect upon theatrical amusements. Anything that 
serves the leisure moments of the public has a certain 
effect upon the theatrical business. Particularly at certain 
seasons of the year the automobile keeps vast numbers of 
the public away from theatres. However, the automobile 
in affording easy and convenient transportation to theatres 
is again a definite stimulant to theatre business. 

It is the same with the radio. While this form of domes- 



tic entertaimnent makes a certain demand upon the time 
of the public it also affords a valuable publicity medium 
for the motion picture industry. It broadens the mental 
horizon of the public and helps in qualifying them for a 
better appreciation of meritorious theatrical entertainment. 

The position of the motion picture theatre is supreme 
in the theatrical world. If the motion picture theatre is 
able to maintain reasonable progress in offering better and 
still better entertainment at low cost its position will 
remain supreme. 

No harm will come to the motion picture theatre from 
without. Its only danger is from within — from careless, 
indifferent and unintelligent management. 

• « « 

Upside Down 

WHEN a picture like "The Cat and the Canary" gets 
out into general distribution and becomes the bill 
for picture houses with a grind policy the abstu-dity of the 
policy which prevents patrons from seeing a picture from 
the beginning becomes plainly apparent. 

Here is an excellent picture, capably directed and cap- 
ably portrayed. It contains a thoroughly interesting story 
and should have a broadcast appeal. But the story hap- 
pens to be one which must be seen from the beginning if 
the patron is to realize that he is seeing a fine picture and 
not a meaningless jtunble. 

Exhibitors continue highly indifferent toward this very 
vital question affecting their business. Every theatreman 
knows that if he is to build business, or even maintain 
such business as he may now be enjoying, he must give 
satisfaction to his patrons. When he plays such a pictture 
as "The Cat and the Canary" under a grind policy, with 
no effort whatsoever made to enable his patrons to under- 
stand and follow the picture by seeing it from the start, 
he is pursuing a course that cannot but lead to disastrous 
results. 

To come in on such a picture at the second or third reel 
is an experience that cannot help but discourage and dis- 
gust theatre patrons. 

We are well aware of the problem involved but simply 
because there is a problem there certainly is no good rea- 
son why theatremen should sit back supinely and allow 
the evil to continue. Exhibitors who will exert every pos- 
sible effort to keep a poor pictiure off their screens will 
show such a picture as "The Cat and the Canary," which 
is a very good picture if seen from the beginning but a 
very poor one if not, without giving the matter a second 
thought. 

We entertain the theory that the industry in the ordi- 
nary course suffers far greater than is realized from this 
upside-down way of exhibiting pictures. But in the case 
of a mystery story the evil becomes so plain that no one 
can deny it. 

» « « 

"Better Theatres'' 

WE wish to commend to the attention of subscribers 
to Moving Picture World the publication, "Better 
Theatres," which appears as Section II of this issue of 
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World. 

"Better Theatres" is the publication of acknowledged 
leadership in the extremely important interests of con- 
struction, decoration, equipment and operation of theatres. 
In fact, it is the one publication which devotes appropriate 
and authoritative attention to these interests. "Better 
Theatres" covers the entire field with which it is con- 
cerned and within its pages are found advertisements of 
practically every item of equipment used in theatres. 

Moving Picture World subscribers will be pleased to 
note that Mr. F. H. Richardson, the leading authority on 
projection and allied matters, will continue in "Better 
Theatres" the department he made famous in the World. 

—MARTIN J. QUIGLEY. 



January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



27 



Exhibitors Tell Changes They'd 
Make If They Started Over Today 

Pick Best Location, Study 
Patrons' Wants, Is Advice 



Lou Kramer Dead; 
Handled Publicity 
For Many Concerns 

Lou Kramer, publicity representative knovm 
from Coast to Coast and particularly in Chi- 
cago, died Monday in Los Angeles, according 
to word received 
from the Coast. His 
death followed short- 
ly after that of his 
father recently in 
Chicago. 

At the time of his 
death, Kramer was 
president of West 
Coast Amusement 
News and was pre- 
paring to publish a 
fan magazine. 

He was with the 
organization of the 
late Thomas Ince, 
and later toured the 
country for Mrs. 
Wallace Reid productions. He was also at 
one time with F B O. He handled local 
publicity for Universal and was also at Uni- 
versal's home office for a time. He had 
charge of publicity for the Lubliner & Trinz 
theatre circuit in Chicago before going to the 
Coast. 




Lou Kramer 



Ohio M, P, T, O. Appoints 
Committee for Work on 
Uniform Contract Meet 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

COLUMBUS, O., Jan. 17.— The Ohio M. P. 
T. O. last week appointed a committee of three 
exhibitors to work with other exhibitor or- 
ganizations in connection with the uniform 
contract committee meeting which starts in 
Chicago January 31. Martin G. Smith, chair- 
man, Toledo; John A. Schwalm, Hamilton, 
and Sam E. Lind, Zanesville, were the men 
appointed on the committee. 



Suspect Arson in Fire 
Damaging the Orpheum 
Theatre, Eldorado, III, 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HARRISBURG, 111., Jan. 17. — The new 
Orpheum theatre at Eldorado was damaged 
today by fire of suspected incendiary origin. 
The Harrisburg fire department helped fight 
the flames. 



Sunday Shows Issue at 
Special Nevada, la., Vote 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

DES MOINES, Jan. 17.— The question of 
Sunday shows which seems to be worrying the 
minds of numerous religious bodies in the 
state of Iowa, will be decided in Nevada 
when citizens of that town put the matter to 
a vote at a special election January 20. 

A group of four hundred voters recently 
signed a petition asking for an election on the 
question of repealing the present ordinance 
forbidding Sunday shows. 



Other Suggestions Include Increasing Newspaper Space, 
Not Booking Pictures Over Eight Reels 

Mr. Theatre Owner! If you were to start over today as an exhibitor what 
changes would you make in your theatre and in its operation? That question 
was put to several representative exhibitors by Exhibitors Herald and Moving 
Picture World and the replies have brought out a number of interesting bits of 
advice to colleagues in the exhibition field, some of their observations being open 
to debate. 

Get Best Location 

Outstanding among the suggestions are these : Be sure you have the best 
location ; Learn your prospective patrons' wishes and fulfill them ; Operate only 
as many nights as you are confident of getting good attendance ; Do not book 
pictures of more than eight reels; Don't buy in blocks unless you control more 
than one theatre; Don't try to start with only one machine; Hire an experi- 
enced operator; Increase your newspaper advertising. 



Following are several representative letters 
in full: 

C. L. TIVENAN, American Legion theatre, 
Nevada, Ohio: 

"If I were to start over today as an exhibi- 
tor I would never attempt to start with one 
machine no matter how small the place. I 
would also have watched the salesman and not 
let him sting me on some of the pictures. I 
would also hire an experienced operator or do 
it myself. I would do a little more adver- 
tising." 

FRANK W. BALDWIN, Town Rail, Pittsburg, 
N. H.: 

"If I were to start over today as an ex- 
hibitor I would probably do just about the 
same as I am now doing, providing I started 
in at the same place I am now running pic- 
tures, as I have in the past few years made 
all the changes which I believe I can make for 
the benefit of my business at this place. 
First Get Best Location 

"However, I will mention that I have been 
an exhibitor in several different towns in the 
past twenty years, but at the present time in 
my home town only, the town of Pittsburg, 
N. H., the most northerly town in the state. 

"To make up a little story of my experience 
in the picture business, or I mean to say to 
speak from the experience I have received 
during these years, I will go on and state: 

"// / were to start in as an exhibitor in 
some town at the present time, I would 
first be sure I had the best location. 
Second, I would ascertain as soon as pos- 
sible the class of pictures the majority of 
my prospective patrons would like best. 
Thirdly, I would start in running the 
number of nights each week which I felt 
sure I would be able to get a good attend- 



Takes Look at Band; 
Gives It Benefit Shows 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ALBANY. Jan. 17.— There will be 
new instruments and new music for 
the village band in Warrensburgh, 
N. Y., because of a two-night benefit 
that was staged last week by Jerry 
LaRock, at his Fairyland theatre. 
The band will reciprocate next sum- 
mer by giving free concerts. 



ance on (I mean a paying crowd) and in 
the meantime I would see at all times 
that my theatre was kept nice and clean 
and well ventilated and well heated at all 
times. 

"I would also have the proper amount 
of advertising 'see that it was put up in 
nice shape at the best locations' for every 
show. 

"After I had tried matters out for a few 
weeks, providing my business was increasing 
and I decided the town would stand another 
night each week I would add on an extra 
night, but this I would not do unless I was 
positive that I would get a good paying busi- 
ness for this extra night, as it is much more 
profitable to run two nights per week and 
make something each night than to run three 
nights and split up the business too much. 

Favors Special Nights 

"As often as I could do so without inter- 
fering too much with the regular nights I 
would put on a big special picture, something 
I was sure would go over big, and I would 
advertise this special big. I mean by that I 
would use a twenty-four sheet, window cards, 
heralds, etc., which would mean twice as much 
advertising as I would use for my regular 
shows, as in this way my patrons would 
understand I had something bigger and better 
for the specials, and I would get advanced 
prices for these specials. 

"I would not care to book my feature pic- 
tures with more than eight reels if I could 
help it, as I would wish to run a news reel 
and a good two-reel comedy with each feature 
picture, and eleven reels makes as much show 
as anyone cares to see; usually seven, eight or 
nine reels is plenty enough to suit any patron, 
especially if you have a show with plenty of 
action. 

"I would be sure at all times to not run 
shows often enough to cut down the atten- 
dance so but what I would have what one 
would call a good crowd, as all patrons enjoy 
the pictures much more with a full house and 
any show will go over much better and bigger 

when there is a large attendance." 

* * * 

J. C. McCarthy, Belle and Regent, Belleville, 
Can. : 

"If I were to start over today as an exhibi- 
tor I would first subscribe for P. Harrison's 
Reports. Would not buy groups of pictures 
unless I controlled more than one theatre in a 
town. 

"Would subscribe for Herald and World." 



28 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 21, 1928 



It*s Still Biggest Trade Paper Event 

"Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World" has settled into its forward stride, but the many well wishes 
being received attest the fact that the merger continues to be regarded as still the greatest single event in the 
annals of journalism in the motion picture field. Of particular interest in this the third issue of the merged pub- 
lication is the fact that the variety of branches represented in these congratulatory expressions points to recog- 
nition of the event as marking an advancement of vital significsmce to all. Subsequent issues will contain 
additional messages received. 



From H. M. ADDISON 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

It would be my pleasure to have you accept congratula- 
tions on the merger of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving 
Picture World." While I am sorry to hear of tl\e passing 
of the "World," I am certain the combined publications wrill 
be of great importance to theatre managers and operators. 
The "Moving Picture World" has long been a great stand-by 
of mine. Some of my very best friends have been con- 
nected therewith, and the many courtesies shown me by 
the "World" and its associates have been and are appre- 
ciated. However, I feel sure that the same pleasant rela- 
tionship which has existed in the past will continue to 
exist between the new combination and myself. Mergers 
make greatness. I have perused your issue of January 7 
from cover to cover. There are many new features which 
are indeed interesting. Your makeup is great. The merger 
naturally gives you a broader scope. The associates with 
whom you have surrounded yourself will no doubt fill all 
the requirements of the trade. 

H. M. Addison, 
Great Lakes theatre, Buffalo, N. Y. 



From J. B. GIACHETTO 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Please accept my congratulations on the merger and my 
very best wishes for your continued success and prosperity. 

J. B. Giachetto, 
Jacksonville Theatre Co., Jacksonville, 111. 



From GEORGE KLEINE 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Just a line to congratulate you on the acquisition of the 
ancient institution that was called "Moving Picture World." 
I trust that the new combination will prove prosperous and 
a source of joy to yourself. 

George Kleine. 



From NAT NEALON 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Permit me to congratulate you on the merger of "Exhibi- 
tors Herald and Moving Picture World." This expansion of 
forces will be a step in the right direction and under your 
dominant leadership will be an asset to the entire industry 
in giving a publication of greatly increased service to the 
exhibitor and producer alike. 

Nat Nealon, 
Arcade theatre, Ann Arbor, Mich. 



From DALE HAN SHAW 

Martin J. Quigley, 

Editor and Publisher, • 

Exhibitors Herald \ 

and Moving Picture World. ' 

Have just received the notice of your combining "Moving 
Picture World" with your paper, "Exhibitors Herald," and 
desire to congratulate you upon this move which I believe 
is beneficial to the industry at large and only a fitting 
tribute of the splendid progress you have made with your 
valued paper. 

Dale Hanshaw, 
Sierra Pictures, Inc. 



From EDWARD L. KLEIN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I have just heard the news of your acquisition of "Moving 
Picture World" and wish to express my congratulations and 
best wishes for the success of "Exhibitors Herald and Mov- 
ing Picture World." 

Edward L. Klein. 

* * * 

From DAVE BADER 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I want to take this opportunity of wishing you a wealth 
of luck and success in the new consolidation of the two 
famous motion picture trade papers — "Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World." I hope that if I can be of any 
assistance at any time in contributing information or assist- 
ing in any direction pertaining to articles on advertising 
accessories, that your sterling organization will call on us. 

Dave Bader, 
Universal. 



From ROY E. CHURCHILL 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I want to offer you my congratulations on the consolidation 
of the "Herald" and the "Moving Picture World." I am 
sure that you will make a great success of the consolidation. 

Roy E. Churchill, 
Branch Manager, F B O. 



From EARL GULICK 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Best wishes for the continued success of "Exhibitors Her- 
ald" and its combination. 

Earl Gulick, 
General Outdoor Advertising Co. 



January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



29 



From HENRY LUSTGARTEN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Just read with keen interest the announcement of the amal^ 
gamation of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." 
As a reader of "Exhibitors Herald" since its inception and 
a devout follower of its presentations column accept my con- 
gratulations and sincere best wishes for a continuation of 
your success. 

Henry Lustgarten, 
Manager, L. & T. Harding theatre. 

* * * 

From BENNIE KRUEGER 

Martin J. Quigley, I;; 

Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

Just read about the merger of "Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World." Please accept my heartiest con- 
gratulations and best wishes for greater success. 

Bennie Krueger, 
Band Leader, Balaban & Katz. 

* * * 

From BEN SHLYEN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Permit me to congratulate you on the forward step you 
have taken in consolidating "Exhibitors Herald" with "Mov- 
ing Picture World." I have always admired the policies and 
the editorial makeup and contents of the "Herald" and I can 
see a future for the new combination in the national field 
under your direction. 

Ben Shlyen, 

President and Publisher, Associated Publications. 

* * * 

From FELIX MENDELSSOHN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I was very much interested to receive your announcement 
of the consolidation of "Exhibitors Herald and Moving Pic- 
ture World" and wish to offer my sincere congratulations and 
best wishes for the success of the combined publications, 
s^^:^. Felix Mendelssohn, 

' ' Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 

* * * 

From BILLY LEYSER 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I have just received the announcement of what I know to 
be the very best amalgamation this industry has yet achieved. 
I want to congratulate you: 

First, because "Exhibitors Herald" has always stood 
for that which was fair and just and has never lowered 
its colors for any individual or group of individuals. 
Second, because you are to hold the editorial reins 
; which will guide the destinies of both magcizines. 
[ Third, because of the utmost faith the exhibitors have 
' in your ability and judgment. 

Fourth, because Mr. Chalmers has recognized in you 
the above powers as well as knowing full well that any 
other affiliation could not work out equitably as regards 
all concerned. 

Fifth, because it assures the producer, exhibitor and 
equipment organizations a publication which now domi- 
nates the field. 

May this new enterprise continue to merit the confidence 
inspired by "Exhibitors Herald," from its very first issue until 
finis is written on the last page of the last issue — which will 
happen long after we have become a mere shadow of 
memory. 

Billy Leyser, 
Cecil B. DeMille Pictures Corporation. 



From DAVE DU BIN 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

I take this means of congratulating you upon the merger 
of "Exhibitors Herald" with "Moving Picture World." 

Dave Dubin, 
Educational Exchange, Chicago. 

* * * 

From HARRY WEISS 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

More power to you. I remember the first number of "Ex- 
hibitors Herald." You have grown and how! Here's hoping 
the growing pains never cease. 

Harry Weiss, 
First National, St. Louis. 

* * * 

From HENRY REEVE 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Congratulations on the new and combined "Herald- 
World" that will serve us this year and many more to come. 

Henry Reeve, 
Mission theatre, Menard, Tex. 

* * * 

From SOL LESSER 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 

Exhibitors Herald 

and Moving Picture World. 

I have your card announcing the consolidation of "Ex- 
hibitors Herald and Moving Picture World." Accept my 
congratulations. I feel sure the merger will be of great 
benefit to all. 

Sol Lesser. 

* * * 

From HARRY D. WILSON 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Well, you nearly floored me this morning with that an- 
nouncement card about the combining of "Exhibitors Her- 
ald and Moving Picture World." What a combine! All the 
movie barons out here will be jealous because you scooped 
everybody with a big combine — the first for 1928. 

Harry D. Wilson, 
Inspiration Pictures, Inc. 

* * * 

From S. CHARLES EINFELD 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Please accept my congratulations on your merging "Ex- 
hibitors Herald" with "Moving Picture World." I believe 
this to be one of the most important and constructive steps 
ever taken in the field of our trade press. 

S. Charles Einfeld, 
Advertising Department, First National. 

* * * 

From GEORGE LANDY 

Martin J. Quigley, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Exhibitors Herald 
and Moving Picture World. 

Sincere congratulations on your acquisition of "Moving 
Picture World" as another step for the leader of the trade 
papers. 

George Landy, 
Publicity Director, First National Studio. 



30 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 21, 1928 




NEW YORK;— Paul Gulick, just to show 
his contempt or something, played thir- 
teen holes of golf on Friday the Thirteenth, 
and took thirteen strokes to make the thir- 
teenth hole. . . Harry Thaw with his stable 
of baby stars, after a cold reception on the 
Coast, is coming back to New York to make a 
picture. . . Harry Rapf, accompanied by Mrs. 
Rapf, arrived in New York last week for a 
vacation. . . Dick Anderson, of International 
Newsreel, has moved his headquarters from 
1600 to the Universal offices. . . Jack Keegan 
has his chest out; baby boy born Tuesday, 
January 10; father and mother doing well. . . 
Tim McCoy, Western star, is taking a three 
weeks vacation in New York. . . Randy White, 
editor, and Jim Cron, advertising manager, 
have resigned from the Daily Review. . . Dave 
Barrist, editor of Brevities, came up from 
Philadelphia to attend last week's session of 
the A. M. P. A. . . /. /. McCarthy is ill in a 
sanitarium, suffering from stomach trouble. . . 
Chester DeVonde, oldtime legitimate and mo- 
tion picture actor, died last week. . . Warren 
Doane, general manager of the Hal Roach 
studios, is in New York to confer with 
M-G-M executives on next year's product. . . 
Hal Burrows, art director for M-G-M, is re- 
ceiving congratulations on the success of an 
exhibition of his original paintings in a Fifth 
Avenue art gallery. . . Tod Browning, eminent 
director of many successes, sailed last week 
for a rest in Europe. . . Will Hays is making 
his semiannual visit to the Coast and will be 
gone about a month. . . Roscoe Arbuckle 
stated last week in New York he would re- 
turn to the Coast in May and begin pictures 
again, but Will Hays hasn't said anything so 
there's still a guess coming. . . Arthur Loew, 
after a month at home, has gone back to 
Europe to see how things are going over 
there. . . John McGuirk is the busy denyer, 
the last being the rumor that he plans to 
resign as manager of the Stanley Company 
of America. . . Eddie Smith, getting to be 
one of the travelingist of salesmanagers, is 
off on another long trip around the Tiflany- 
Stahl exchanges. . . Harold Franklin says 
there is no chance of Wesco merging with any 
other company, but wait and see what a bad 
gruessor Harold has come to be since he went 
West. . . Irving Lesser has given up one of 
his string Long Island theatres, the Strand at 
Rockville Center. . . Monta Bell returned 
from abroad last week and after a few days 
in New York, went on to the Coast. . . Pat 
Dowling, general Handy Andy of Christie 
Brothers, is in New York and hobnobbing 
with Charlie McCarthy and Russell Holman. . . 
Al Aaronson, Central European supervisor of 
M-G-M, returned to New York last week for 
a series of conferences with his company ex- 
ecutives. . . Sol Lesser is in New York and 
expects to remain a couple of weeks. . . Eddie 
Eschmann, who recently resigned from Pathe, 
will join up with the fast coming Columbia 
Pictures. . . Dave Brill, manager of Tiffany- 
Stahl New York exchange, is the proud pos- 
sessor of the handsome silver loving cup of- 
fered fcy his company for the most contracts 
during Christmas week. 

SPARGO. 



Buys "Cardboard Lover" 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 17.— M-G-M has 
acquired the motion picture rights to the play, 
"Her Cardboard Lover," produced by Charles 
Frohman at the Empire last season, with 
Jeanne Eagels. 



Tillie Classic Romance Retold 



<<'yiLLIE'S PUNCTURED ROMANCE," which laughter long ago raucously 
voted a classic, is told again, this time by Christie, with another Louise, 
Miss Fazenda, in the title role created by Louise Dressier. Edward Souther- 
land directed the Christie revival, while W. C. Fields and Chester Conklin 
arc starred. It is a Paramount release. 




Mr. Fields, Miss Fazenda, and Mr. Conklin 




Miss Fazenda Up In the Trenches 



January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



31 



Lines Form for Senate Battle 
Over Bill to Bar Block Booking 

WoodhuU Warns Against 
Stampeding into Action 

Favors Support of Brookhart Measure If Danger 
Through Federal Regulation Is Obviated 




FOR i iilL m 

PLEASE WRITE NOW 

TO 

Senatoi-s FRANK B. WILLIS and SIMON D. FESS 
Congressnu-n Theo. Burton, RobL Grosser and 
Charles H. Mooney 



A'l 



III 



HOUSE OFFICE BUILDING 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

To Vote for the Brookhart ANTI-BLOCK 
BOOKING BILL 
For Further Information Inquire of 

THE MANAGER 

Or 6E0R6E W. ERDMANN, Cleveland Motion Picture Exhibitors' 
Association, Film Building, Cleveland, Ohio 



This block one-sheet will be displayed in 
the lobbies and foyers of theatres affili- 
ated with the Cleveland Motion Picture 
Exhibitors Association. 

Filmless Glencoe Will 
Soon Have Theatre, 
Shows on Sunday, Too 

Sunday showings of motion pictures have 
been authorized by the Glencoe village board, 
although at present there are no theatres in 
Chicago suburbs community. Theatres will 
be allowed to remain open daily until mid- 
night. 

David Nelson, North Shore business man, 
announced recently he is contemplating build- 
ing a theatre in the wealthy and exclusive 
little village. 

Exhibitor Arrested in 
Quiz on Plot to Burn 
Theatre of Competitor 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

GURDON, ARK., Jan. 17.— Earl Powell, 
proprietor of a theatre here, was arrested 
and placed under $10,000 bonds in investiga- 
tion of a charge of the hiring of Marcus 
Faulkner to burn the Wright theatre, operated 
by a competitor. Faulkner, according to the 
police, confessed to having been hired to 
burn the theatre. 



N. A, O, B. L, Opens Office 

(Special t» Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 17.^Campaign head- 
quarters for the Washington Citizens' com- 
mittee opposed to blue laws have been opened 
in the Carlton hotel, within a couple of blocks 
from the White House, and Linn A. E. Gale, 
secretary-treasurer of the national organiza- 
tion, is in charge of the headquarters. 



[By Special Correspondent of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World] 
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17.— Introduction in the House of Representa- 
tives last week of the anti-block booking bill introduced in the Senate 
December 13 by Senator Brookhart of Iowa brought directly before that 
body the question of the legality of blocks, with which the Federal Trade 
Commission has been struggling for a number of years. The bill was 
introduced by Representative Cannon of Missouri. 

Proponents and opponents of the Brookhart anti-block booking bill are lin- 
ing up for a war to the hilt when the measure introduced by the Iowa senator 
comes up in hearings before the Senate committee. 

Woodhull Warns Against Stampede 

R. F. Woodhull, president of the M. P. T. O. A., warned against being 
stampeded into action on either side, and added that the bill should be sup- 
ported "if we can obviate any danger to our business which may come through 
federal regulation." 



Other outstanding developments of the week 
were as follows : 

The T. O. C. C. in New York called 
a meeting for January 26 to plan to help 
pass the measure. 

The board of trustees of the M. P. T. 
O. of Ohio pledged support of the hill. 

A trailer and a block one-sheet endors- 
ing the measure to be used in theatres 
affiliated with the Cleveland Exhibitors 
Association. 
Woodhull in his' statement said Secretary 
M. J. O'Toole had discussed the bill with 
Brookhart and that the latter had expressed 
belief that the danger of political control of 
the industry could be obviated. 

T. O. C. C. Calls Independents 
Independents not members of the T. O. C. 
C. are being urged to attend the meeting of 
that organization at the Astor Hotel. The 
slogan of the call is "The War Is On." The 
T. O. C. C. some time ago endorsed the bill 
which, the organization says in spreading its 
campaign to New Jersey, New York state and 
Connecticut, will "save our investments and 
get us a square deal." 

Some divergent views were expressed at 
the Columbus meeting of the trustees of the 
state organization but a resolution pledging 
the support of the Ohio boy finally was 
adopted. 

Trailer Appeal to Patrons 

A trailer to be used in Cleveland theatres 
reads : 

"Senator Smith W. Brookhart has intro- 
duced an Anti-Film:-Trust Bill in the United 
States Senate. 

"The passage of this bill will permit this 
and all other Independently Owned Theatres 



to choose from a greater list, the kind of pic- 
tures best suited for our audiences. 

"Under existing conditions we are compelled 
to buy the entire block of pictures and are 
forced to show some pictures that are not 
adaptaible to our clientele. 

"We appeal to our patrons to kindly write 
to your Senator and Representative and ask 
them to support the Brookhart Anti-Film- 
Trust Block Booking Bill. 

"The Management." 

The block one-sheet is reproduced elsewhere 
on this page. 



Weber Joins Lumas as 

Head of Foreign Trade 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 17.— John Norbert 
Weber will be associated with Lumas to head 
the newly formed export and import depart- 
ment. The formation of this new department 
is in line with an increased production and ex- 
pansion poHcy, according to President Sam 
Sax. 



Falls Off Elephant, Sues 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 17.— Lila McComas, 
screen actress, has filed suit against Al G. 
Barnes, circus owner, and Fox Films for 
$82,000 damages for alleged injuries received 
when she was shaken off the back of an 
elephant while scenes for a picture were being 
made. 



Bomb Wrecks Rear of Palace Hippodrome, 
Seattle; Theatre Has Non-Union Policy 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 
SEATTLE, Jan. 17. — A bomb wrecked the rear of the Palace Hippodrome 
theatre, here', after midnight last Friday. Windows were shattered in buildings 
for blocks in every direction from the theatre. It is believed that a black powder 
bomb was used and planted in the rear of the building. The theatre, one of the 
Sterling theatres chain, operated under a non-union policy and had been annoyed 
numerous times during the last year by stench bombs. 



32 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



January 21, 1928 



1 



British Film Inferior ^ hut American 
Fordizedf Say English Authors 

Patriotism Carried to Insanity by Exhibitors in Britain, Declares Edgar 
Wallace — Gilbert Frankau Hits Conference System 

' * I RITISH films have not held a candle to the films which have come 
to us from America and from other countries." — "American films have 
-■— ^ fallen into a rut, have become stereotyped, Fordized." These two ver- 
dicts by world-known authors (the first by Edgar Wallace, the second by Gil- 
bert Frankau) are interesting excerpts from articles in the special New Year 
edition of the Film Renter, copies of which have just been received from 
London. 



TEN YEARS AGO 

PITTSBURGH, Jan. 17. 

THE Universal force is crippled when 
C. A. Zipf, bookkeeper, and Wil- 
liam Welsh, his assistant, are both 
stricken with pneumonia. 

* 

Joseph Klein resigns as sales man- 
ager of the Paramount Artcraft ex- 
change to become sales manager for 
Metro in New York City, Albany and 
Buffalo. 

* 

A. J. Coyle, manager of the Arsenal 
theatre, and George Voo'enberger en- 
list in the United States Army for duty 
in the World War. 

The Sauer building, 804 Penn avenue, 
is entirely converted into a film build- 
ing. 

* 

Myrtle Stedman, Paramount star, 
makes personal appearances all week at 
the Garden theatre, northside, and plays 
to big business. 



PRNEST W. FREDMAN, editor and pub- 
■t-' lisher, introducing the issue with the ad- 
vice that capital for production must come 
from _ Central Europe, the Dominions and 
America, adds that "better and more ambi- 
tious pictures are being embarked upon." 

"God knows' it is not my job to boost Amer- 
ican films," says Edgar Wallace, "but, not be- 
ing a congenital idiot or hopelessly insincere, 
I cannot pretend that the films we have pro- 
duced in this country would be regarded as 
worthy even if they had been turned out by 
Lithuania or some other spot of microscopic 
industrial importance, or that they are in any 
way comparable with the pictures which 
Hollywood has sent us. 

"So far, even the worst American films 
have had more exhibition than some of 
those English films which have been 
acclaimed as the best." 

"The only thing mysterious about a 
scenario," he says, "is the choice of the people 
who write them. Good camera work, good 
direction and good story are the three essen- 
tials for successful exhibition. When people 
stand up in the House of Commons and spout 
about the disloyalty and the greed of the 
renters and exhibitors', I marvel at their nerve. 
Carry Patriotism Too Far 

"Exhibitors have carried patriotism to a 
point of insanity. Because a film has been 
British, and because they felt they were doing 
the right thing by their country, they have 
again and again put pictures into their pro- 
grams which have been an ins'ult to the intelli- 
gence of their audiences." 

Wallace has a cheery optimism, neverthe- 
less, predicting that "in the next few years we 
are going to see a demand for British pic- 



tures', not because they are British but because 
they are pictures." 

Frankau charges that the stereotyped 
nature of the American production is evi- 
denced by "the sex stuff, which is the 
same in every film, whether it is 'Ben 
Hur' or an ordinary picture." The author 
blames this condition to the conference 
system, so that the picture is "made to 
appeal to a mass psychology, and as a 
result it is slick and has 'pep,' but it is 
very stereotyped." 
"When we make British pictures in real 
earnest," says Frankau, "and in a larger 
quantity, we must make them to represent our 
national life. I do not believe in the interna- 
tional picture, and I think it is wrong to 
assume that American pictures are interna- 
tional. American pictures are American pic- 
tures." 

Would Express British Spirit 

"It will be by expressing the British spirit 
in our pictures that we shall sell our pictures 
throughout the British Empire, and in the 
United States," the writer advises, adding that 
he has refused to allow one of his novels to 
be filmed in America, one reason being that he 
does not want his characters distorted, as has 
happened before. 

Maurice McElvey, with a number of British 
successes, says that he "did not need a Quota 
Bill," adding that "my experience has proved 
that whenever a good British film was made, 
exhibitors showed it." 

Publix Makes Changes in 
Personnel in Southeast 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ATLANTA, Jan. 17.— As a result of a gen- 
eral promotion plan inaugurated by Publix 
Theatre Corporation, important changes in 
personnel became effective last week. Jesse 
L. Clark becomes district manager for Florida. 
Charles S. Morrison becomes city manager in 
Jacksonville. Walter Lloyd has been named 
assistant to Clark and James Stelling has been 
placed in charge of Daytona Beach. Newton 
L. Treece is now manager at Gainesville, Fla., 
where a new theatre is being built. 



Mexico Likes "Chang" 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

MEXICO CITY, Jan. 17. — "Chang," the 
Paramount picture, has struck the fancy of 
people here. Police were called upon to re- 
strain the crowds which stormed the Olympia, 
Paramount's premiere theatre in the city, the 
entire seating capacity of the theatre selling 
out the first hour, it is said, and at the same 
time the picture was being shown in a first- 
run circuit of 12 theatres throughout the city. 



Howard Stays with DeMille 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 17. — William K. 
Howard has signed with Cecil B. DeMille 
again and will direct 'The Last Cab" as his 
next picture for Pathe. 



Holding Firm to Take 
Over Realty of Skouras 
and Missouri Theatre 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ST. LOUIS, Jan. 17. — A holding company 
to be known as the St. Louis Properties Cor- 
poration has been formed to take over the 
real estate interests of Skouras Brothers En- 
terprises, Inc., including the Ambassador thea- 
tre and office buildings and the Grand Central 
Theatre building. The new concern will also 
acquire the Missouri theatre and office build- 
ing now held by the Famous Players Missouri 
Corporation, controlled by Paramount. 

The Skouras Brothers Enterprises will re- 
ceive $500,000 in cash and $1,000,000 in de- 
benture bonds for its equity in the theatres, 
and in addition will own a one-third interest 
in the St. Louis Properties Corporation. 

N ew Keith and Skouras 

Theatres for St, Louis? 

( special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ST. LOUIS, Jan. 17. — There are persistent 
rumors that the Keith-Albee-Orpheum-Pathe 
combination will erect a 5,000 or 6,000-seat 
theatre in downtown St. Louis. 

Curbstone gossip also has it that the 
Skouras interests have under consideration 
the erection of a large theatre and hotel. 

In the meantime the construction of the 
William Fox theatre at Grand and Washing- 
ton boulevard has been temporarily retarded 
by a strike of structural steel workers. 



Finis Fox to London 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 17.— Finis Fox, well- 
known scenarist, has signed a contract to di- 
rect a big feature production in England. He 
will leave for London immediately after he 
prepares a new screen play for Dolores Del 
Rio's next United Artists production. 



Will Rebuild Theatre 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

ALBANY, Jan. 17.— The Grand theatre at 
Johnstown, N. Y., which was burned to the 
ground two weeks ago, will be rebuilt, accord- 
ing to Frank A. Empsall, of Watertown, one 
of the owners. 



Censors Cut Only Truth 
of Vice, Educator Says 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

PORTLAND, ORE., Jan. 17.— 
"Usually any play gets by which 
pretti£es vice, or merely indulges in 
coquetry with sin, and as long as it 
is amusing and comforting, nobody 
protests much. But let an author 
treat of vice, sin, or the tragedies in- 
cident to the life of the senses, seri- 
ously and realistically, and the vice 
crusaders pounce on him." 

So declared S. Stephenson Smith, 
professor of English at the Univer- 
sity of Oregon, in his address here 
on "Censorship — a Safeguard or a 
Danger.^" The speaker contended 
that ideas, like men, should have a 
chance to be born free and equal, 
"fo try to interfere with the natural 
sifting," Smith said, "is to cramp 
genius, to discourage art, and to do 
far more damage than good. Censor- 
ship is rather more a boomerang than 
a means of defense; it recoils on the 
censor and is not a weapon that can 
be accurately aimed." 



January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



33 



Church Club Plans Sunday Show 
In Finish Fight with Bluenoses 

Operate on Sabbath Only; 
Lease Exhibitors' Houses 

Attendance Will Be Limited to Membership — Emporia 
Move Expected to Bring Election 



Paper Consolidation 
Called Salient Event 

(Printed in Paramount Studio News) 

By far the most important event in 
the field of motion picture trade press 
activities in the closing days of 1927 
was the merging of the Exhibitors 
Herald and Moving Picture World 
two of the outstanding publications 
devoted to the film industry. 

The Moving Picture World, which 
made its bow in 1907, was the 
first actual motion picture trade 
paper in America, and in 1911 ac- 
quired "Film Index," the first paper 
devoted to the films. The Exhibitors 
Herald came into being in 1915, 
under the leadership of Martin J. 
Quigley and has progressed steadily 
as a power in its field ever since. 

Mr. Quigley will continue as edi- 
tor and publisher of the consolidated 
publication to be known as The Ex- 
hibitors Herald and Moving Picture 
World. Mr. Quigley is an able 
leader, a fearless spokesman and a 
determined champion of what he con- 
ceives to be the right as he has 
proved many times. 

Paramount wishes him unceasing 
progress and success in the enlarged 
duties he has assumed. 



17 Managers Are Out 
in West Coast House 
Cleaning, Says Rumor 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 17.— Seventeen man- 
agers have lost their jobs as a result of a 
house cleaning in Southern Cahfornia theatres 
of the West Coast Chain brought about by 
H. H. Franklin, it is being rumored here. A 
number of the young assistant managers from 
the Northern houses were given the berths 
after the old managers were given their 
notice, it is said. 



Film Offices Flooded as 

Sprinkler Pipes Burst 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

PITTSBURGH, Jan. 17.— Several tenants 
in the film building at 1030 Forbes street suf- 
fered much damage to equipment last_ Wednes- 
day morning, when the automatic water 
sprinkler on the second floor ceiling burst 
and showered the rooms. 

Loss of $1,000 was suifered by W. B. Jones, 
who manufactures commercial films and is 
local representative for Pathe News. Film 
exchanges sul¥ering damage were Film Dis- 
tributing Company, Independent Photoplay 
Company, and the A. & S. Steinberg office. 



Zukor Visits Chicago 

Adolph Zukor, president of Paramount, 
came to Chicago from New York to be 
present Saturday night at the celebration 
in honor of the 75th birthday anniversary 
of his mother-in-law, Mrs. E. Kaufman. 



[By Special Correspondent of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World] 

KANSAS. CITY, Jan. 17. — "Church versus Church" is the main bout on 
the program of the Sunday closing battle this week at Emporia, Kan., the 
result of which probably will be accepted as a precedent in other cities through- 
out the state, insofar as the Sunday labor law is concerned. 

Club Will Show Sundays Only 

The Sunday closing fight, which has been in newspaper headlines for three 
weeks, no longer is a case of exhibitors versus ministers. With William Allen 
White, nationally known writer, as chairman of the committee which will 
select the films, the men's club of the St. Andrews Episcopal church in Emporia 
has organized what is to be known as the Emporia Screen Club. 



The club will show Sunday pictures only, 
leasing theatres from exhibitors, and the at- 
tendance will be by membership. Member- 
ship may be obtained by anyone who desires 
to belong. 

Plan Ruled Legal 

The billiard halls of many Kansas towns 
for years have thwarted blue laws advocators 
through the membership plan, which has been 
ruled legal in Kansas, so when Emporia mini- 
sters decided to close up all motion pictures 
theatres on Sunday the exhibitors found a 
ready friend in the Episcopal club. The profits 
of the shows will be used in improvement in 
church work. 

Following the announcement of the 
plan, a wail which echoed around the 
state of Kansas came from the bluenoses, 
who saw themselves outwitted at their 
own game and satv a rival church reap- 
ing benefits from the folly of other 
churches. 

Such a condition, of course, is not expected 
by exhibitors to be permanent but it undoubt- 
edly will last long enough to show the citizens 
of Kansas the ridiculous side of the stand 
taken by radical ministers who fear the op- 
position of Sunday shows. All of which 
eventually will lead to an election on Sun- 
day shows, it is believed. 

Frederick W. Lewis, president of the Col- 
lege of Emporia, branded the club plan as an 
attempt to evade the law and denounced the 
movement. 

Bank Cashier Heads Club 

W. R. Coulson, president of the screen club 
and cashier of one of Emporia's largest banks, 
replied that the members of the club viewed 
the move as an honorable means of obtaining 
funds through the presentation of high class 



feature pictures on Sunday afternoons to "a 
limited number of good friends." Listed 
among those supporting the club plan are some 
of the most widely known Kansans. 

The move is considered a signal victory for 
the exhibitors of Emporia, a town of about 
20,000 population, who now are enjoying a 
hearty laugh at the ministers who led the 
fight against them and who probably will re- 
pent of their folly ere the battle ends. 



Arch Selwyn Plans 
Chain of Theatres 
in 12 British Cities 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

LONDON, Jan. 17.— It has been an- 
nounced by Arch Selwyn that he has con- 
summated plans in association with George 
B. McClellan and Amery Parkes whereby 
he will erect motion picture theatres in 12 
key cities in Great Britain, and one in Paris. 

The new corporation, directed by Sel- 
wyn, has already purchased theatres in 12 
British cities. These are now being used 
as music halls and, according to plans, will 
be torn down to make way for the new 
theatres to be constructed. The cities 
chosen are Leeds, Liverpool, Newcastle, 
Brighton, Southampton, Dublin, Glasgow, 
Manchester, Golders Green, Dover and 
Blackpool. Selwyn, in association with 
Charles B. Cochran, also plans to build in 
London what will be one of the largest 
theatres in the world, it is said. 



Sensational Merger Unites 2 German 

Circuits, One First National's Emelka 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World) 

BERLIN, Jan. 17. — Consolidation of the nationally important motion picture 
theatre chains of Phoebus and Emelka, the latter controlled by First National, has 
been effected, giving the combined circuit over SO ffrst-run houses in all key cities 
with a total seating capacity of over 50,000. The new chain is second in size only 
to the UFA circuit. 

Besides the Capitol, most prominent picture house in Berlin, Phoebus operates 
the Phoebus Palast and Marmorhaus in the capital and leading theatres in Dres- 
den, Munich, Dusseldorf, Hamburg, Kiel, and Nuremberg. Announcement of the 
merger proved a sensation in the German film industry. 

Charles Chaplin's new United Artists production, "The Circus," will have its 
German premiere in a few Weeks at the Capitol. 



34 EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD January 21, 1928 

Livewire Texas Exhibitors Build ~ 
B. O. by Helping Communities \ \ 



Successful Houses Have Outstanding Citizens As Owners or Managers — 
Must Be Good Mixers and Purveyors of Goodwill 
[By Special Correspondent of Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World] 

SAN ANTONIO, Jan. 17. — Fellowship and goodwill are prime requisites to 
success in any line of business, but especially in the motion picture field. 
The exhibitor, if he is to obtain any degree of success must be a good 
mixer, a livewire and a purveyor of goodwill, in Texas, at least. No matter 
what the class of his house may be — "grind," picture or de luxe, he must be 
one who is respected in his community, admired by fellow citizens and looked 
to for authority when community problems arise. In other words, he must be 
a good citizen. 



TEXAS, as a whole, can be considered lucky 
in its choice of theatre managers. In Dal- 
las, Ft. Worth, Houston, Galveston, San An- 
tonio and Waco there are managers who have 
proved themselves real assets to their com- 
munities, who are alive to every opportunity 
to be of service to the public, who delight in 
having a hand in things. 

J. P. Harrison, for many years manager 
of the Hippodrome in Waco, is respected 
by every citizen of that city as one of 
the leaders in its affairs. He is always on 
his toes ready to grasp the slightest possi- 
bility of putting his theatre deeper into 
the good graces of Waco citizens. He is 
noted for his matinees for orphanges, 
Christmas tree parties, free school mati- 
nees, his help to the Community Chest 
and for many other activities whereby the 
only tangible return to the theatre is 
goodwill. Harrison has put the Hippo- 
drome on a paying basis not excelled by 
any other theatre in the state, no matter 
how large or small. He has a proved 
percentage of profits steadily throughout 
the year that is far greater than that of 
any of the larger houses. 
William Horowitz, Jr., owner of the Horo- 
witz theatres in Houston, is another livewire 
Texas manager. He interests himself in all 
civic activities in Houston and capitalizes on 
every community event through various hook- 
ups. Horowitz is noted for his ability to diag- 
nose the effect a new project is going to have 
upon his houses ; hence he is enabled to offset 
any negative influences which might arise. 
Horowitz is also enthusiastic in taking a part 
in charitable affairs and staging benefits. Now 
he has climaxed his long career as a com- 
munity figure by organizing the first major 
athletic club in Houston, sponsoring all popu- 
lar sports, and his popularity is shown by the 
large number of memberships in his new or- 
ganization. 

Hoblitzelle a Community Man 
Karl Hoblitzelle, owner of Interstate Thea- 
tres in Texas, instructs his various managers 
to go into community projects and charitable 
affairs with a zest. Nothing pleases Hobht- 
zelle so much as to see his theatre operators 
engage in an undertaking with the city or 
county such as christening of boats, opening 
of bridges and roads. The results are that 
the Majestic theatres are standing in good 
with city officials wherever they are located. 
Raymond Wille, manager of the San Antonio 
Majestic, and Eddie Breamer of Hous'ton are 
probably two of the most alive and energetic 
managers on the Interstate Circuit when it 
comes to building goodwill. 

Bob Blair, manager of the Texas, San 
Antonio, is a stickler for fellowship and com- 
munity respect. Blair interests himself and 
the theatre in club affairs in San Antonio, 
stages all the major benefit shows in that city 
and donates use of the theatre to any char- 
itable organization or school for the presenta- 
tion of plays and programs. His most recent 
goodwill builder was among the Spanish- 
speaking people of San Antonio, when he 
staged a midnight matinee benefit show for 



them, all the proceeds going to their Christ- 
mas Tree Fund for poor Spanish children. 

Raymond B. Jones Another 

Raymond B. Jones, manager of the new 
W^orth theatre in Ft. Worth, has a personality 
that puts him into community limelight im- 
mediately upon his entering any project. He 
has worked in such great ventures as the Old 
Trail Drivers Convention in Texas and the 
promotion of Community Chests in various 
Texas cities. He is a great mixer and has 
put many losing houses on a paying basis. 

Other examples too numerous to mention 
might be cited throughout the state, among 
them J. R. Collins, Publix theatre manager 
in Galveston, a leading figure in social and 
civic affairs of the city. 

Trackless Train of 
M-G-MEnds Tour 
of South America 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 17.— Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer's trackless train and famous ballyhoo 
is finishing its South American _ tour by voy- 
aging through Chile after having spent the 
late summer, fall and winter in Brazil, Ura- 
guay and Argentina. Arduous roads were 
encountered during the entire South Ameri- 
can tour, and at one time it became necessary 
to change the motor. 

The trackless train has already toured the 
United States, Canada, Great Britain and Eu- 
rope, and if arrangements can be made it is 
planned to send the train on tours through 
Australia, Japan, and possibly even through 
China and India. If this is done the M-G-M 
train will have made a world tour in the 
interests of the company and the American 
film industry in general. 

Bind Porter, Take $2,000 
From Theatre Safe; Film 
News of the Southwest 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan. 17.— Two band- 
its induced the porter of the Bison theatre, 
Shawnee, Okla., to open the door, then bound 
him and took $2,000 from the safe. The 
Austin at Nacogdoches, Tex., was robbed re- 
cently, but the amount taken was not learned. 

Ross Dorbandt will build a theatre at Jasksonville, 
Tex. Fire started in the Crazy theatre, Mineral 
Wells, Tex., but was put out with little damage done. 
The: Liberty at Hugo, Okla., has been destroyed by 
fire. The Pastime, Tuscola, Tex., has been bought 
by the H & H circuit, and the Lyric, Texico, Tex., 
by the Civic Theatres Company. The Star, Denison, 
Tex., has reopened after remodeling. Tracy Flanna- 
gan is the new manager of the Martin, Mt. Pleasant, 
Tex. 

Ham's Majesftic, Ringling, Okla., has been 
sold, and Ham's Capitol opened. 



HOLLYWOOD,— Well, it looks like a pros- 
perous new year for the railroads and 
the steamboat companies. Everybody you 
talk to hereabouts is arranging a trip to 
Europe. 

* * * 

But then there's nothing that broadens one 
(and flattens one) like a Continental tour. 
The big butter-and-egg man goes abroad to 
"study the situation" and consult the cows and 
chickens ; the automobile manufacturer goes 
over there to avoid getting hit by his own 
machines, and the picture producers go abroad 
to look at films and come back and enjoy their 
own. 

* * * 
Sweet Atmosphere ! 

And speaking of foreign countries, I see 
Germany is going to make sugar out of air. 
Kansas ought to get hold of a few of those 
scientists and make some use of its cyclones. 

* * * 
Want the Money 

And did you note that the Vitaphone artists 
are up in arms and are going to ask pay for 
three shows a day wherever the films are 
playing deluxe houses. 

* * * 
Who's to Judge? 

They've started something in Chicago. The 
other night they threw a man out of a movie 
theatre because he laughed at a subtitle that 
was not intended to be funny. It's going to 
be hard on those with a sense of humor. 
They'll have to gag themselves whenever they 
attend the theatre for fear of landing on the 
sidewalk. 

Good Schooling 

I've discovered the real purpose of Lindy's 
flying trips. He wants everyone to brush up 
on his geography. 

* * « 
Nice Check 

Well, Charles Spencer Chaplin is all square 
with Uncle Sam again. He handed over $1,- 
670,630.38 and got a receipt in full for income 
taxes. And the government wouldn't even 
knock off the 38 cents. 

* * 

Leap Year Too 

In Chicago they're teaching the girls court- 
ship in 10 easy lessons. It looks like a tough 
year for the young men of the Windy City. 

* * * 

These courtship experts will tell the ladies 
how to be happy on $1500 a year. The $1500 
is spent thus : One Ford $700, gas and repairs 
$800. 

* * * 

Famous Last Words 

"Kiss me, dearie, I just spent our $1500 for 
a fur coat." 

— R. M. 

Man Dies After Injury 
in War Scene Explosion 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

TRUCKEE, CAL., Jan. 17.— While filming 
a "Russian battle" scene for "The Red 
Dancer of Moscow" at this mountain winter 
resort, Daniel Silverwood, aged 30, of Reno, 
Nev., received injuries from which he died at 
a Reno hospital. The accident occurred dur- 
ing the filming of a Cossack battle. Silver- 
wood got too close to a dynamite explosion 
during the fighting. Charles Farrell and 
Dolores del Rio are playing the leads in the 
Fox picture. 



January 21, 1928 



EXHIBITORS HERALD and MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



35 



Exhibitors Blame Sales System 
As Bar to Care in Buying Films 

Fewer Screenings Than 

Say Exchange Men 



Lesson in How NOT 
To Write Publicity 

An example of how NOT to write 
publicity is evidenced in a piece of 
copy presumably written by National 
Industries News Service, Inc., of 
Washington, D. C, in calling atten- 
tion to "the growing consumption of 
glycerine." 

The motion picture industry bap- 
pens to be the unfortunate subject of 
this bit of socalled information, con- 
taining such supposedly humorous as- 
sertions as this: "In the midst of 
stark tragedies the glycerine pro- 
ducer smiles joyfully up from the pit 
at the despairing heroine and counts 
each tear." 

The industry is scarcely likely to 
take kindly to such far-fetched efforts 
to dignify a myth formerly conSned 
to humorous papers. 



300,000 Shares of 
Consolidated Film 
Are Put on Market 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 17.— Offerings were 
made last week of 300,000 shares of $2 cumu- 
lative participating preferred stock of Con- 
solidated Film Industries, Inc., by Hornblower 
& Weeks, Cassatt & Co., Dominick & Dominick 
and Paul H. Davis & Co. 

The stock was priced at $26.50 per share 
and two shares of common stock were offered 
with every 10 shares of preferred. The par- 
ticipating preferred is entitled to $2 fixed 
cumulative dividends and will participate share 
for share with the common in all dividends 
in any year after the common stock shall have 
received $2 per share. 



Puhlix Takes Over Loew's 
Melba Theatre in Dallas 

(Special to Exhibitors Herald and 
Moving Picture World) 

DALLAS, Jan. 17.--Publix has taken over 
Loew's Melba here and plans to operate it 
under a picture and prologue policy. Loew 
has operated the house for about three years, 
having taken it over when it discontinued^ a 
straight picture policy, shortly after its 
opening. Publix holds the lease on the build- 
ing. James Owen (Skipper) Cherry, formerly 
manager of the Metropolitan in Houston, is 
to be the manager, with the house falling 
under the head of C. B. Stiff's department, as 
a class B Publix house. Maurice Lawrence,